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HARDWARE / LAPTOP / COMPUTER for use in Unity development? Ask here! (and only here)

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by scorp2007, May 15, 2021.

  1. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    It's primarily custom systems. That said a decade out of an AIO is fairly unusual from what I understand with the average lifespan being 3 - 5 years. I've never tried them though as air cooling has always been sufficient for me even with my 5950X (and I'm in a silent case rather than an airflow case).
     
  2. crazBullet

    crazBullet

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    I use a 2060GTX and seems ideal for most things
     
  3. gorik2001procsharp

    gorik2001procsharp

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    Ready to move from i7-12700h laptop, to i9-13900k desktop, the processor affects performance.
    Also will buy Samsung 990pro and 7200mhz 32 gb ddr5, thats has a big impact on speed.


    Switched from i5-9300h to i7-12700h, difference is anourmous, from 9-13 scripts compilation, to 5-8 sec.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2023
  4. Ryiah

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    The 14900K is due out sometime in the next couple of months. It's a refresh with slightly higher performance.
     
  5. HonoraryBob

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    It looks like the GPU market is better than it was in 2021 when I last asked about upgrading; is that the case? My current machine is now probably nearing its end, so I need to upgrade soon if possible.
     
  6. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    Kinda. NVIDIA came out of the pandemic and last mining craze with a better understanding of just how much their customers (>90% marketshare at this point) are willing to pay for their cards. AMD is slowly being edged out of the market and so their cards are more competitively priced.

    AMD's 7800 XT 16GB card will be releasing in a few days for $499. It has higher performance, higher memory bandwidth, and higher total memory than the RTX 4070 which costs $599.
     
  7. Antypodish

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    Now GPU demand will increase toward AI processing. So I wouldn't be so sure about sensible prices in longer terms.
     
  8. Ryiah

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    Agreed. I've seen estimates that it costs $3,000 to make an NVIDIA H100 and they're selling them for $30,000 which is far higher profit margins than they have to getting from consumer cards. At some point I expect them to take away from consumer card production just because they're selling them as fast as they make them.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2023
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  9. SwingWren

    SwingWren

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    Hello, I'm switching from my Arc770 to another from nvidia or amd (too unstable for unity editor, at this point I don't know If a editor crash is caused by me or a the graphics card). I'm looking into a 4070 or an 7800 XT. Purely from your subjective experience which one (nvidia or amd) is more stable for working in unity?
     
  10. Antypodish

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    From my experience, generally you will find NVidia higher compatibility with Unity and other applications.

    On the side note, I had one workstation with AMD GPU, as I wanted to try this family of GPUs, but had problems on one of Unreal application. After replacing with Geforce, all issues has gone.
     
    SwingWren likes this.
  11. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    NVIDIA -> AMD -> Intel integrated -> Intel dedicated.
     
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  12. biebelbrott

    biebelbrott

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    IMO, people love to spend thousands of euros on hardware thats unnesecary. You can make any game you want using Unity on a second hand system that will run you less than 500$, build times will be good, so will script compilation, if you want to spend 5k-10k more just for slightly better performance, I will never understand that..
     
  13. Ryiah

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    Sounds like the reasoning of a person who has never made anything more complex than Flappy Bird. Let me assure you that having worked on high end games targeting the latest consoles that a $500 system is basically trash for development at that level and only good for verifying if your game will run on that level of hardware.

    So if you're not developing high end games cool but let's not pretend that everyone only makes simple games.

    My previous system (Ryzen 5 3600 w/ 32GB RAM) took around 2.5 hours to make a build of my at the time most complex work project. My current system (Ryzen 9 5950X w/ 64GB RAM) dropped that down to around 30 mins.

    At the time the pandemic and cryptocurrency were in full swing so I ended up paying $1,250 for a 5950X bundle that came with a budget gaming monitor, but the MSRP difference was supposed to have been around $500. I'm not even going to compare memory prices with how stupidly inexpensive it is right now.

    If you're a professional you should always build to maximize your workflow as anything else is stepping over dollars to pick up pennies. A $500 computer will just cripple your ability to get work done in the future and who wants to hire someone that can't do their job.

    I wouldn't understand it either but then if you're spending that kind of money you've done something very wrong or you have very specific requirements (eg an artist). You can achieve a massive leap in performance going from $500 to $1,000 and yet another massive leap jumping from $1,000 to $2,000.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2023
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  14. biebelbrott

    biebelbrott

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    Actually im working on a 3D MMO atm, but seeing as you resort to insults in your first sentence I feel like i hurt your feelings, and you got mad. Therefore I will refrain from discussing this further with yourself.

    You may rest assured though that my i7 16gb ram, 2x 256gb ssd and high end nvidia card only cost me 400$, had to buy a network card separately though ;)

    The moment you take your new hardaware out of the box it drops in value by 50%, just like a new car the moment you get it. Last generation is maybe 10% less performant AT BEST, these last generations you get maybe 5-6% increase over last gen.
    So IMO buying the latest gen is just dumb, just like people who buy a new iPhone the moment it comes out, LMAO, talking about sheep ....
     
  15. Ryiah

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    I'm annoyed when people provide bad advice because then I'm left picking up the pieces while the person who gave it is long gone.

    Right, what you were talking about was a system that no one can reasonably buy for $500 outside of a very lucky transaction. So now you're not just giving bad advice. You're giving deceptive advice. That's even more annoying.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2023
  16. biebelbrott

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    It wasnt a fire sale at all, go on ebay or whatever your country has locally and you will find these prices everywhere.
     
  17. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    No. You won't find these prices everywhere.
     
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  18. biebelbrott

    biebelbrott

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    1660Ti.png
    Im sure you looked in those 10 secs it took you to reply lmao
    Maybe ill post some ebay screens for you since your too lazy EDIT: Thats a 1660Ti
     
  19. biebelbrott

    biebelbrott

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    WatsThis.png literally whole pages of them

    But I guess im just "talking about was a system that no one can reasonably buy for $500 outside of a very lucky transaction" - Ryiah 2023
     
  20. Antypodish

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    Sure there are FEW of these, not like many. But these are typical hardware sold in the shopping malls, from leftovers. Or second hand, often assembled from mining hardware. Besides some lucky cases.
    Which usually they put one, or two wow parameters, but saving and cheaping on other components.
    Usually not providing information's about type and speed of drives. Frequency of memory. Radiators,
    Expansion capacity of desktop tower. Etc.

    And if to read reviews, these are not great. Surely not classified as HIGH END PCs. Maybe MID END at best.
    For sure not for high capacity professional game development as it is suppose to be, per discussion.
    Unless not caring about development time.
     
  21. biebelbrott

    biebelbrott

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    Yeah im sure its all used mining hardware, my bad, ill go spend 10K on a system next time instead of 500$ for a system that gives me comparable results.
     
  22. Randolass

    Randolass

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    Hi everybody, my question is: which processor is better for unity? One with more cores or one with less number of cores but more clock speed; do Unity use all the processor's cores? And the graphic card? How about Rtx 4070? 12GB is enough memory? Talking about HDRP, which is the minimum processor? I have seen the amd 7900 due to its price and low TDP. My last question is: how much RAM is needed to make Unity fly? Thank you so much.
     
  23. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    Here's a modern budget system with a processor that is a little slower at single-threaded but thanks to the presence of SMT quite a bit faster in multi-threaded. An upgrade path is available to as new as a 5950X (16-core/32-thread) CPU whereas that 9700K has to be thrown away for another $500 junker.

    But what do I know I'm apparently just some schmuck that spends $10K on a computer.

    CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($97.00 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte B550M K Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($89.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: TEAMGROUP Vulcan Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 CL18 Memory ($32.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Intel 670p 1 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 3.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive ($39.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Asus Phoenix GeForce RTX 3050 8GB 8 GB Video Card ($209.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Phanteks Eclipse G300A (1 Fan) ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: EVGA 500 W1 500 W 80+ Certified ATX Power Supply ($53.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $568.94
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2023-10-10 16:20 EDT-0400

    For anyone on a tighter budget that can't afford $500 here's one with integrated graphics. Fun fact by the way: the 5600G is about 20% faster than the 3600. It's actually on par with a 9900K. So if you can afford another $30 in the above system you can have a fair bit more performance.

    Here's a benchmark video for the integrated graphics. It's a very solidly performing one too if you can't justify a new card, or if you just want something temporary until you've saved up for one. Just don't expect to be able to play Starfield.


    CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 5600G 3.9 GHz 6-Core Processor ($125.36 @ Amazon)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte B550M K Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($89.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: TEAMGROUP Vulcan Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 CL18 Memory ($32.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Intel 670p 1 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 3.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive ($39.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: Phanteks Eclipse G300A (1 Fan) ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: EVGA 500 W1 500 W 80+ Certified ATX Power Supply ($53.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $387.31
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2023-10-10 16:27 EDT-0400


    Sarcasm aside let's sum up what we've learned: at best used hardware just ties new budget hardware, you have no upgrade path with used, used hardware was likely mined on, and since you have no warranty if it fails you will have lost that $500.

    Outside of extreme examples (eg an old Dell Precision workstation) a used computer is just a sucker's purchase.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2023
  24. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    Unity benefits from both and generally speaking the more expensive a processor the better it is at both single and multi-threaded work. Unless you choose older models or server grade processors it's hard to get one that favors one over the other these days.

    AMD and Intel are roughly identical in performance. Intel's CPUs technically have more cores but a large number of them are efficiency cores as they're using a Big-Little architecture similar to how mobile phones have been for the past decade. You basically have to look at benchmarks to know actual performance.

    My RTX 3070 8GB card was solid for my last major HDRP project which was a stylized fighting game, but it's very much a case by case basis depending on your game. An RTX 4070 or an AMD 7900 should be fine. One important thing to be aware of though: the best third party lightmapper available only supports NVIDIA.

    https://assetstore.unity.com/packages/tools/level-design/bakery-gpu-lightmapper-122218

    For my fighting game I saw roughly 80% usage of 32GB. I'm currently on a 64GB DDR4-3600 kit because the cost is usually low enough that it's just not worth worrying about. Here's the closest one that matches mine to give you an idea of the price of these things.

    https://www.newegg.com/g-skill-64gb-288-pin-ddr4-sdram/p/N82E16820232999
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2023
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  25. Antypodish

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    You will probably get CPU with at least 6 cores anyway.

    Depending on your development plan, I would focus personally on higher clock.
    It is not only that Unity may benefit more, even tho some processes are multithreaded, but also any other applications or games, they benefit from higher clock. Lesser of many cores.
    Your OS also may reserve some core for it's own processes. For example web browser, or video recording, while running intensive application.
     
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  26. Randolass

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    Do you think that buying a threadripper not worth it?
     
  27. Antypodish

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    I didn't say that.
    But most likely you won't see advantage of 32 cores, unless you use applications, which utilise multithreaded CPUs.

    However there is higher clock version with 12 cores. So I would consider that. Also depending on your budget.
     
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  28. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    Threadripper's main advantage is the PCIe lanes. It's high core count is somewhat secondary. If you don't need a ton of slots available you don't really need a Threadripper. Cost is very high too as you can't really build your own as the best models are locked to OEMs and unavailable for individuals to purchase.

    Technically you can buy previous generation models but they're going to perform worse than a modern consumer processor like the 7950X3D or 13900K thanks to having an out of date architecture.
     
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  29. Randolass

    Randolass

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    How many cores support Unity? Ryzen 9 7900 is a very balanced CPU: low price, lw TDP; but if more cores will give me best performance, maybe i could spend much money in 7950X3D. Other programs that i use are blender 3D, photoshop, illustrator, premiere and Daz Studio.
    Thank you for your repplys
     
  30. Randolass

    Randolass

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    Thank you, i like Ryzen. Another question, I compare the CPU's performance in a web that uses the passmark benchmark to test CPUs. Is a valid test for making an idea of Unity's performance?
     
  31. Ryiah

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    You can make rough guesses with it. It's what I use for apps like Unity that don't have actual benchmarks.
     
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  32. SundownStudio

    SundownStudio

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    How do you secure your project from being stolen while you are developing it?
    Is this a valid concern considering we know some motherboards contain backdoors and preinstalled malware?

    Is there an actual way to build and/or secure a laptop where one doesn't need to worry about losing all their work after years of development? Especially considering we now need to keep Unity online every 30 days, meaning you'll no longer be able to develop on an offline-only machine.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2023
  33. Ryiah

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    I'm not aware of any motherboard manufacturers that do this granted I live in the US. It might be different in places like China. I know there's bloat on a fair number of laptops but that's not malware that's just useless software. You can and probably should wipe your laptop after you get it.

    Windows has volume encryption. With that and a strong password you should be fine. I can't imagine many thieves are interested in your game as much as they're interested in your credit card number and other personal info.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitLocker
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2023
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  34. Antypodish

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    If anything is going to happen to your project, is either you make it public, you allow harmful software on your PC, you provide credentials to your system, or cloud, or your hardware get stolen. Hacking into any online cloud service is only concern, if your password is weak and default, like 1234. You got higher probability to forget your credentials to your email and loosing access to services, before anything above.

    I have never heard about motherboard related hacking issue, which would affect Unity. Unless it is hardware malfunction.

    And if anything accessing your drive somehow, it is most likely it will not be any Unity developer, or anyone, who can make anything of your in-progress project. What may happen, is either blocking your files and asking you to pay hafty for unlock them. Or being after your bank details credentials, which is more likely be you tricked into some malicious website, usually via email scam, before anyone try to get into you PC.

    And of course, there is no help for user's stupidity, or naivety, or lack of knowledge, if opening attachments and links, without validating source, when they coming from.
     
  35. Ukounu

    Ukounu

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    Wrapping your computer in tinfoil is a cheap and secure method of preventing motherboard manufacturers from stealing your Unity projects via preinstalled backdoors.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2023
  36. SundownStudio

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    Thanks for your response. Just this year it came out that Gigabyte motherboards were sold with backdoors affecting millions of users: https://www.reddit.com/r/hardware/comments/13wnqju/millions_of_pc_motherboards_were_sold_with_a/
    Then you had Operation Shadowhammer with Asus motherboards back in 2019: https://www.forbes.com/sites/kateof...users-find-out-whos-affected/?sh=209d4828132d
    Moreover, anytime you buy a gaming PC or motherboard, check where it is being warehoused - chances are it's not in the US.

    Let's say you wake up tomorrow and your game is a big hit in China, and you haven't even released it yet. What recourse do you have? Assuming you have minimal online presence (which many of us basement developers lack), where would you even post about it? The fact that this concept of security is so quickly swept under the rug is kinda disturbing, considering anything that can happen eventually will, and the only question is how many people will it affect until something is done about it.

    People with value seek to protect it. Details at 11.

    Besides your tinfoil solution wouldn't work anyway considering Unity requires 30-day internet access, so you can no longer develop on a closed-intranet. They could've just tied the certification to publishing, why do they need to reauth every 30 days?

    Maybe I'm just being paranoid, but I also don't want to be the test case. And unfortunately I need a new computer.
     
  37. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    After skimming through the Wired article (linked by that reddit thread) I don't consider this a problem at all. It's just an automatic update tool for the motherboard that runs when you restart Windows. GIGABYTE commented that they've cryptographically signed the firmware and the site that it comes from and that's good enough for me.

    https://www.gigabyte.com/Press/News/2091

    Again I don't consider this a problem as the people most likely to steal from you are after your identity data not the games you've created. Plus the companies most known for selling clones of other peoples games are known to create them from scratch in extremely short time periods. You should worry about them not an update app.

    https://www.engadget.com/2018-07-11-mobile-clones-app-store-google-play-indie-voodoo.html
    https://www.reddit.com/r/apple/comments/7m0ura/ketchapp_copy_my_last_game_what_can_i_do/

    If you must have the guarantee that nothing will happen the best answer is to choose a different OS since as far as I'm aware the update app that executes only does so on Windows. MacOS is a solid choice as you already need the hardware to target iOS (and they have insane battery life) but Linux would be fine too.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2023
  38. Antypodish

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    Yes you are.
    Since no one will be bother stealing buggy unfinished product.
    Past 30 years I haven't heard about a game product being stolen by some backdoor in a hardware.
    And if anything, there would be plenty opportunities past decades.
    And it was by at least magnitude easier back in years.

    Once you release, anyone can copy and decompile at easy. So anyone wanting to steal your game, time effort drops to nearly 0.
    Instead you suggesting on someone trying wasting time to hunt for hardware with Unity projects, via some arbitrary backdoor (big waste of time and energy), then spending weeks and months trying to fix bugs and features, on untested yet product.

    If anything, it is more likely you will post your game to some scam reviewer, praying on game keys.
    Source simply ask for keys, pretending source is a big YT or Santa, then you give them away keys happily, hoping for free game promotion. In exchange you get 0, and given away keys / product with 0 resistance.
    Then yes, 0 effort getting access to your unreleased game.
     
  39. SundownStudio

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    Thanks to both of you for your help.

    Never thought of that, I'll be careful. Thanks
     
  40. CodeSmile

    CodeSmile

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    I could use a little input regarding a possible upgrade.

    Current: Ryzen 9 3900X, 32 GB DDR4-4000, 2TB Samsung Pro Evo 990
    Upgrade: Intel i9-14900KF, 64 GB DDR5-6000, 2TB Crucial T500

    I suppose this would be an upgrade from high-end to higher-end. I'm mostly interested in "can I feel it?". And in that it's 90% about script compile / assembly reload for me. The usual: type in some code, tab over to editor. Rinse repeat. But also running a lot of tests, which are single-threaded. Less frequent but a lot slower: code coverage, with dotCover. Rider is my tool of choice, and that also has some nagging delays at time. So does compiling code docs (doxygen, docfx).

    Overall I can work just fine with the current system but I still feel kind of handbraked when it comes to doing a lot of small code changes and testing in the editor. It's maybe 2-4 seconds of reloading every time. Not much, possibly not much to improve on, but frequent enough that it can throw me off, annoy me.

    Problem is: this upgrade would cost me €/$ 2,000 give or take. The only alternative I have is swapping just my current CPU with the 5950X for about €450 but I tend to think that's negligible, may even hurt performance due to the lower clocks, but I could more easily ebay just the old CPU to offset the cost.

    What are your thoughts on this?

    I take it CPU speed is still by far the most important aspect of cutting down assembly reload times?


    And does anyone have experience in how far a SSD Raid0 (PCIe 4) can speed up Unity workflows, if at all?
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2023
  41. Antypodish

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    @CodeSmile
    I doubt you will notice any much of difference between DDR4-4000, and DDR5-6000. The clocks on DDR5 are much slower, so gain is lees perceived. Seems to me at current point of time still just pure marketing. Unless you can get clocks around 20-20-30 for DDR5.
    Only advantage is, you will have have an opportunity in the future, to upgrade to faster DDR5s if they will come to fruition.
    Question is, will you be upgrading just DDR5 in next 2-3 years, to be even worth it.
    If pricing is along the same DDR4-DDR5 and Motherboard, then perhaps DDR5 can be way to go. I personally opted for DDR4.

    2TB Crucial T500, that is around 7k read/write which is good for apps and assets loading.

    CPU wise, if you go for i9, bear in mind, you can get advantage of it, if you overclock it.
    You can set even AI based overclocking on good motherboards.
    Mind, if you overclock and want to run CPU on full capacity for longer than few min, you want good cooling.
    I am skeptical on capacity of fan based coolers, like Noctua for example, as on the internet conducted tests never show long time performance. Just short running tests.
    May be controversial, but when I did research while ago, I found, that Noctua will throttle your i9 CPU on full capacity, as it reaches limits of thermal conductivity. That may be due to fact, heat need to travel distance on the radiator, before can be dissipated. Gamers will prize it, but mind, most games do not utilize CPU at full capacity. And i9 for most is overkill. So for many even stock fans would do enough.

    Mind, big fans takes a lot of casing space. And I am sure you are aware of that.

    However, don't take me for a word, and I encourage you to do own research.

    I personally have two PCs on closed loop liquid cooling.
    One near decade old and still runs fine 0 maintenance.
    One less than a year. I don't remember the test scoring, but comparing with my colleague's PC setup, which was at that time on comparative Ryzen with DDR5, my CPU setup beat it by some margine. Don;t know if that because of CPU, DDR4, cooling, or motherboard.
    On overclock and full CPU run, I am able to keep CPU significantly below 70 deg C. So that may play significant role into it.
     
  42. CodeSmile

    CodeSmile

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    Thanks for your input! I'm actually opting for the i7-14700K now because it's practically the same as the i9 when it comes to single threaded speed. And yes, likely AIO.

    Btw, the new 14xxx have boards ignore their thermal limits. That's why they're faster, and why they're running so hot. If you set their thermal limits to the same as the 13xxx line, which is what Intel recommends, they barely run any faster and also run slightly cooler. I'm also interested in this AI overclocking thing ... but I guess I'll have to find out myself if I want to know how it affects Unity iteration speed. This is just not being benchmarked, unfortunately.
     
  43. Antypodish

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    Unfortunately it is hard to compare and give any meaningful results, since it was quite a jump for me, from older hardware. Specially now there are Efficiency and Performance cores.

    I think that even may be more than sufficient for you for most applications. I was hesitating between i9 and i7 last year. Eventually went for i9 (I could :) ). However, I would be good with i7 as well in my case.
    You get fewer cores. But I think, unless you write some app that need multithreading a lot, or compiling shaders a lot, or perhaps baking, you may not need as many cores in general.
     
  44. CodeSmile

    CodeSmile

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2014
    Posts:
    5,129
    Yes, some single thread benchmarks even put the 14700 in front. But the margin is totally negligible.

    Right now I'm thinking: it's not worth a 1,500 upgrade for me. Essentially I only get PCIe 4 for the SSD (Samsung Pro 990 NVME) and the faster CPU which at most provides 30% better single thread performance - rough guess.


    As to "AI Overclocking": it's a sh...load of AI hype-crap! Worse than I've ever seen so far!

    Basically it's the same as the BIOS does with "automatic" overclocking, except you have this in software now and a shiny "AI" label. I bet my life there is nothing in this piece of software that warrants calling it an "AI". It simply checks the hardware, possibly by identifying it and looking it up in a database, or by measuring some standardized sensors eg voltages and so on. In the end, it makes an educated guess as to what the CPU is capable of overclocking. The results I've seen: bumps the multiplier by 1, 2 or 3 steps for the top-tier cores (the first two) and 1-2 notches up for the efficiency cores. This is almost exactly what the BIOS already does!

    So don't fall into the trap thinking it might be something like DLSS. It's definitely NOT considering your actual workload and shuffling instructions of applications around to magically make them more efficient - what I would have expected.

    This is marketing bullcrap that just aggravates me. :mad:
     
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  45. Ryiah

    Ryiah

    Joined:
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    Posts:
    20,774
    You're unlikely to ever see CAS latencies that low but then you don't need to as it's not the sole factor in memory performance. CAS latency is simply the time it takes for the memory to go from a READ command to starting the flow of data. Once that flow starts though you no longer care about CAS and now care about the speed rating.

    Instead of worrying about the lowest latency you should try for a reasonable mix of the two. For example DDR5-8000 is a 33% speed increase and can be found with latencies that are less than 33% higher than DDR5-6000 while having an almost identical cost.

    You could also just upgrade the CPU and RAM. AMD's 5000 series is about 25% faster than the 3000s. A 5950X is $450 and a 5900X is $300. A 64GB (2x 32GB) DDR4-4000 memory kit is about $180. An i7-14700K would be 65% faster than the 3900X but this is one-third the cost for most of that (25% single and 40% multi) with a 5950X.

    https://pcpartpicker.com/product/Qk2bt6/amd-ryzen-9-5950x-34-ghz-16-core-processor-100-100000059wof
    https://pcpartpicker.com/product/KwLwrH/amd-ryzen-9-5900x-37-ghz-12-core-processor-100-100000061wof
    https://pcpartpicker.com/products/memory/#b=ddr4&S=4000&sort=price&Z=65536002
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2023
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  46. Antypodish

    Antypodish

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2014
    Posts:
    10,735
    Yeah, it is more than likely.
    Fortunately this was nearly 0 factor for me, when did a purchase. I was wondering, how it "learns" and applies that. Besides, it does overclocking balance for you. AI feature was just bonus. But I don't have comparison data, how good or bad it is.

    For me most important was silence when nearing idle and at low wok load. I practically don't hear it in quite room. But it is OK for me, where at higher load, fans noise is increasing.
     
  47. kahpehavuc

    kahpehavuc

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2024
    Posts:
    1
    Hey guys. I'm using Macbook Pro 2019 version for unity right now. Is it good for it? And one question that I want to ask.What do you think about Ryzen 5 5600G for game development. Is it good enough for Unity?
     
  48. Ryiah

    Ryiah

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2012
    Posts:
    20,774
    We'd need to know what you're aiming for. Unity's system requirements scale with the project. You can load the editor on just about anything but as soon as you start working with it the requirements change drastically. Can a 5600G load the editor? Yes. Can it make mobile games? Yes. Can it make high-end raytraced games? No.

    For hardware you already have try running the sample projects and see what happens. For best results use the exact version specified for the sample project.

    https://assetstore.unity.com/packages/essentials/tutorial-projects/viking-village-urp-29140
    https://assetstore.unity.com/packag...ects/book-of-the-dead-environment-hdrp-121175
     
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  49. Theta_

    Theta_

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2019
    Posts:
    12
    Hello,

    My 2015 gaming laptop I used to develop in Unity just died. I planned to replace it anyway as the performances weren't good (especially domain reloads) and as I am slowly transitionning from hobbyist to fulltime unity dev.

    So I want to buy a desktop, mostly for Unity devellopment.

    My current project is a URP one with relativelly simple 3D graphics. But I will probably make more demanding projects in the future and I plan to keep this desktop a long time.

    I have a budget of 2k€. Maybe up to 3k but only if the performance gain is worth it.

    What should I pay attention to? Obviously a high end CPU is needed, with a good SSD and 32 Go RAM (or 64?). But how important is the GPU? Is a decent gaming GPU ok or should I aim to a high end one?

    Can someone suggest me an hardware configuration?
     
  50. Antypodish

    Antypodish

    Joined:
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    Posts:
    10,735
    Look for vme 2 drives. The one which are directly attachable to sockets next to CPU. Not via other interfaces. This will be most demanding part, based on how files are managed by Unity.

    I would focus personally in higher CPU frequency per core. Then depending on budget, consider for example i5 then i7 and i9. Consider also cache. I have no experience with AMD as much, but I see tendency of better performance on Intel. Also I tried AMD GPU cards, but they start crashing Unreal applications. So had to replace it for Nvidia.

    Solid motherboard of course.

    I would advise at least 64 GB me sticks for dev. Should last you for years in type of work you are doing. Unless start messing with media files editing.

    What to consider here is, DDR4 or 5.
    I would go with 5, if the pricing is similar
    But at the time I was buying, DD5 wasn't any better than DDR4 in terms of performance, for higher cost. He difference would be noticeable most of the time. So yes keep in mind, which architecture you are going.

    And GPU. Here is big consideration. But look and benchmarks. Selectt GPU as last depending on budget.

    And importantly do not neglect PSU. Make sure you got plenty power in reserve. Specially if thinking of higher end GPU. And other peripherals. I.e. external drives. Or even wanting charge phone from PC.

    Make sure casing has good cabling management, and has plenty space for airflow. Personally I focus on Silencium cases, as I need quiet build as possible.

    Personally for decade I go with liquid cooling. Including most recent build. On i9 12 gen I am unable to reach CPU temp above 60-70 deg celcious on highest demanding tasks. It saves space in casing. Good fans based cooling can take lot of space inside casing. So keep that in mind for future hardware expansions. I.e. Blocking ports. I haven't seen good benchmarks of fan based cooling for development, which requires a lot of cores running for a prologue time. Usually benchmarks test some games, which rarely use all available cores. So I take all such test and fan based cooling with a big pinch of salt.

    Consider lower noise components. But usually comes with premium price.

    Consider size of casing. Can your current choice and future gpu card that may go into?
    Can mobo support it?
    Or do you need large tower at all?
    You want keep external drives inside casing? Does it have slots and space for these.
    Etc.

    Some thoughts of top of my head.