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Why I Think The OUYA Will Succeed (And Get Better)

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by PhobicGunner, Dec 22, 2012.

  1. PhobicGunner

    PhobicGunner

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    [I'm fairly certain this is the correct place to post this, please correct me if I am wrong]

    As an Indie developer working on a Unity game with the hopes of releasing for OUYA in the near future, I am needless to say quite excited about the little rubiks-cube-sized console. But I tend to see a lot of negativity surrounding the console, despite the

    For starters, the technical specs are usually the first point of contention. In a nutshell, the OUYA will have about the same processing power as the Nexus 7 (and the same storage capacity as the cheapest model, as well). It's Tegra3 will be overclocked, as well as optimized to run on constant power instead of a battery source, but otherwise it's the same chip.
    And people generally say "But the OUYA doesn't have nearly enough power to compete with the Xbox 360 or Playstation 3, let alone whatever's coming next".
    And they would be correct. The OUYA cannot compete with the Xbox 360 or the PS3. It's a good thing the OUYA was never meant to compete.
    The OUYA does not provide an alternative to the three console giants. It provides something entirely different, in the same way that the Xbox isn't nearly powerful enough to compete with gaming PCs but doesn't need to as it provides something else.
    The OUYA stands to be far more innovative to make up for the lack of power, both in design of it's marketplace (including a free playable component will be a requirement for all games in the market, so players can easily judge whether to buy a game or not by playing a free trial) and in the openness of development (no big licensing contracts or expensive developer kits).

    Another point people bring up is that OUYA is built on Android. "Why not just plug my phone into my TV?" they say.
    And there are two very good reasons why OUYA is better than just plugging in a tablet. One, because your phone actually has to work twice as hard to output video to the television (it now has to copy the framebuffer to two output sources instead of just one) but the OUYA will only have to output to a single source, and two because games on the OUYA will be specifically designed from the ground-up to work on the OUYA (including OUYA gamepad controls), whereas games for Android are designed for touchscreen support (and any gamepad support is either accidental or an afterthought).

    Additionally, OUYA is superior to a normal Android device where fragmentation is concerned. There won't be a need to support 500 different models of OUYA made by 20 different manufacturers. There will only be one. In this regard, even if OUYA comes out with updates on a regular basis it will still be much closer to iOS in terms of ease of device support.

    And on another point, OUYA is superior to mobile devices in general where multiplayer is concerned. While mobile devices tend to be limited by data plans (and in practice some can be quite slow in terms of internet speed), the OUYA will be connected straight to your Ethernet, and will be far closer to traditional consoles in terms of internet performance.

    In closing, I think the OUYA will succeed in the same way many indie games succeed, for the same reason people pay for Minecraft or The Binding Of Isaac. These games don't sport the bleeding-edge graphics techniques of the AAA giants, but what they do provide is something new, something innovative. In the same way, OUYA does not have the power of it's counterparts, but instead provides something innovative and different.

    Should the OUYA be a success, and I do think it will be, I think it has a good future. I believe we can expect future iterations to grow in power and capability. I'm excited about the prospects.
    Thoughts?
     
  2. Zionmoose

    Zionmoose

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    To be honest, you pretty well said everything that is in my head. I agree whole heartedly with you and I am very excited for this new gaming frontier.
     
  3. makeshiftwings

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    The only thing that seems interesting to me about the OUYA is that it aims to be "open". If it fails there, I think it's going to be dead in the water. It will be nothing but an expensive Android phone that can't make calls and is too big to fit in your pocket. Any console is only as good as the games that it gets. From a customer perspective: if I already own an Xbox 360, why would I buy an OUYA? If all of the games I want are available on both Xbox Live and OUYA, then there's no reason to get an OUYA. So the question becomes: how many games will ONLY be available on the OUYA? Most console game companies already publish to both 360 and PS3 despite it being a huge pain in the ass; would any of them be willing to make a game only for OUYA when they have the ability to also port to Xbox Live? I'm not sure I can see what it plans on delivering that gamers can't get elsewhere more easily.
     
  4. npsf3000

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    I think you've made a fundamental mistake in your reasoning - at $99 the Ouya is cheaper than any existing 'gaming' phone, pc or console.

    ------

    I personally think Ouya could be big - but they've got a ton of work to do. It's about building a solid brand/ecosystem so as to fend off competitors, and getting millions of these devices into homes.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2012
  5. makeshiftwings

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    I want to add: I do think it's a nice idea, and I hope it does succeed; I just have my doubts. The idea of "an open console" has been tried several times before and always failed.
     
  6. makeshiftwings

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    I can get an Android phone for free if I renew my contract! But yeah, I see your point; "expensive" probably wasn't the right choice of words there. I had started to write "expensive paperweight" and then changed my mind halfway through ;)

    Still though, most gamers already have a console, a phone, and a computer. So it's not useful to compare the price directly to the competition. There aren't going to be many people thinking of buying either a phone or an OUYA, or either an Xbox or an OUYA. Most people will be deciding whether they need an OUYA in addition to the phone and console they already have.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2012
  7. PhobicGunner

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    It's a mistake to think of the OUYA as the same as any other Android device - it's fundamentally different both in design and in target audience.

    You won't be seeing Call of Duty or Battlefield on the OUYA. The truth is this console was never meant to attract the interest of the big console game companies. Instead, you'll be seeing a large number of original and innovative indie games. Which is a good thing, while the big consoles are having the same several hundred rehashes and sequels OUYA games will focus on what's new and fun instead of for the sake of money.
     
  8. makeshiftwings

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    Right, I wasn't talking about CoD; I mean Xbox Live Arcade and Xbox Indie Games. All those indies making games have the option of porting to Xbox, and if any of them like money, they probably will. Even Notch, who endlessly complains about Microsoft and Xbox and is quoted on the OUYA page cheering about openness, sells his game on Xbox Live. Why would anyone making a "new and fun" game decide to sell it only on the OUYA if they could instead sell it on both the OUYA and Xbox Live?
     
  9. npsf3000

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    You sure?

    I volunteer in children's ministry... we've got something like 4 consoles now - if the Ouya was available we'd be talking close to $1000 in savings IIRC. New parents, who want to get a console to keep their kids entertained can now choose between $100 or $400 etc. Schools/colleges might use this as a programming tool etc.

    Don't look at what their market isn't, look at what their market *is*.

    What about all those indies who use game engines, I don't know like Unity, where porting to Xbox live is not in the slightest bit trivial?
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2012
  10. PhobicGunner

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    ^ This. OUYA is already planning on direct support for the Unity game engine, likely via the Mobile license and some kind of API we can download for Unity.
    Developing for OUYA would be a snap compared to Xbox Live Arcade, and many orders of magnitude cheaper to boot (you can only even get the Xbox license for Unity if you are a registered Xbox developer/publisher, and it probably costs a huge amount of money)
     
  11. makeshiftwings

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    I would think a children's ministry would much prefer a Wii, which is just as cheap, and has the games and Nintendo IP that kids love. Or you could get an older console like a PS2 or N64 for $10 used or even free (I've seen them in free boxes on the street). Those old consoles have a huge library of games. The OUYA will have almost no games when it launches; it would probably be unwise to buy it at launch if there's a chance that it will fail. That's the problem with trying to sell a game console: if no one makes games for it, it's useless. Also, I don't think parents really have that much of a choice in what console to buy their kid. If the kid whines and whines that he wants an Xbox, then that's probably what you're going to get him for Christmas, not some weird other console that he's never mentioned. That's why toy commercials target kids rather than parents... the kids are the ones who really make the buying decision ;)
     
  12. npsf3000

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    We'd prefer it if we can get an Ouya, which is just as fun and has just as great games. For our Friday night kids club I think our weekly takings are around ~$50 [minus food, arts crafts, and many other consumables] - so the extra ~$300 a console isn't trivial - as sports director that a heck of a lot of balls :p


    Except of course probably a substantial portion of all successful mobile games...

    I don't know where you grew up, but kids don't always get exactly what they asked for... plus who's to say kids won't want an Ouya?
     
  13. PhobicGunner

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    Have you seen the launch lineup for the OUYA? There is already a fairly sizable library of Indie games coming to the OUYA, at current count over a hundred already confirmed.
     
  14. makeshiftwings

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    Developing for Xbox is not that expensive or difficult. You can develop for Xbox Indie Games for free; you can use XNA with VS Express and your own Xbox as a dev kit. More importantly, the money you can make by being on Xbox Live is huge compared to the setup cost, which is why everyone does it.
     
  15. PhobicGunner

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    I tried to develop an XNA game engine quite recently. It's hard as hell and I never even got 10% of the way through before remembering all of the reasons I love Unity.
     
  16. makeshiftwings

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    I haven't actually; where is the list?
     
  17. PhobicGunner

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  18. makeshiftwings

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    Hmm I haven't heard of most of those games. I know Hawken (though it says it's uncomfirmed) and Minecraft (which is specifically not a launch title; Notch said he'd consider it only if they survive their launch), and I know some of the really old games like Final Fantasy 3 and Bard's Tale. Still, none of those games strike me as anything that would get a twelve year old super excited compared to anything on the other consoles. Also, every game on there that I know about is also already available on other consoles.
     
  19. makeshiftwings

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    I know a lot of people are very passionate about the OUYA and I wish you guys all the best. It sure would be nice to have another console. I'm just saying to keep things in perspective; realize that many have tried this and failed in the past. And that despite the constant loathing of Microsoft and Sony that the entire game development industry likes to express, they're all still making their games for Windows, Xbox, and PS3 instead of Linux, Indrema, and Phantom.
     
  20. PhobicGunner

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    Actually, I think Human Element was specifically announced as a title exclusive to the OUYA. And I think one of the devs was a former developer at Trey-Arch.

    EDIT: Dusty Revenge also looks pretty badass ;)
     
  21. npsf3000

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    How many android based consoles are there with 50,000+ preorder sales? Just to keep things in perspective...

    And you've missed the entire mobile gaming world.
     
  22. Meltdown

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    XNA is dying. Many XNA developers have moved over to Unity, I was one of them, and that was 3 years ago.
    While XNA is a good learning tool on the basics of game programming, unfortunately it comes nowhere close to the productivity and feature set of Unity, and never will, unless MS had to invest some serious cash into it, which they don't seem to be interested in doing.

    This means more and more games will be developed in Unity, meaning less games for Xbox live arcade.
     
  23. makeshiftwings

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    I think we're drifting from my main point: what is the OUYA going to offer gamers that they can't get somewhere else either better or cheaper?

    Phone Games: I already have a phone, and if I didn't, I would buy an Android phone way before I would ever buy an Android cube that was stuck to my TV, couldn't make calls, didn't have a camera, was too big to carry, didn't have a touch screen, etc.

    It's Cheap: Not really. $99 is cheaper than an Xbox 360 or PS3 (for now, in a year or two when the next-gens come out the price will drop steeply). But it's a free OS put on cheap hardware. You could get an old PC and install Android on it for less. You could install Android on a Raspberry Pi and have something both smaller and cheaper that would play Android games on your TV. Or, since you apparently have a HD TV in your living room (why else would you buy an OUYA) you probably also already have either a phone or a computer, so you could plug those into your tv instead for "free" and play Android games. The only thing an OUYA offers compared to any other Android device will be whatever games are OUYA-only. Which brings me to...

    It's Open: Only sort of. We still have no idea how it will actually work out in the end. They say you're allowed to root it, but who cares, you can root anything. It's got an open API due to Android, but all the "closed" platforms have open API's to write games to as well. The only sort of openness that would really interest me is if they let developers distribute on it freely without any licensing or certification, but they don't: they plan to control their marketplace and certify all games themselves before letting you sell to it, just like every other console. They also have even more restrictive licensing than other consoles... you can only sell FreeToPlay games, no other software.
     
  24. makeshiftwings

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    You can sell Unity games on Xbox Live arcade.
     
  25. npsf3000

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    Better or Cheaper? That's a pretty hard challenge - after all Consoles are cheaper than Gaming PC's... but Gaming PC's are better - therefor neither should exist?

    So, out of 7Bn+ people there's one potential sale lost...

    Who's 'you', and why do you think they have the time or inclination to take on one of your suggested DIY routes?


    ------

    Construct a gird. For the columns have 'Ouya', PC, Xbox 360, PS3, Wii, GS3 [or another smartphone]. For the rows have ease of use, cost, novelty factor, ease of dev, screen size. Roughly rate them out of 10.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2012
  26. nipoco

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    Apparently, you don't understand the idea behind OUYA. A lot people don't like to play games on the phone. They want to use a real controller and not some cumbersome virtual thumb sticks on a touchscreen, smeared with oily fingerprints.
    This is a device for games only with it's own interface. And Android is working under the hood.
    It's the same to say 'Why should I buy a XBox 360. I already own a Windows driven PC with games'

    And besides that. There are tons of OUYA exclusive games.
     
  27. npsf3000

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    Out of 5, with 1 being the best, in 5 mins off the top of my head:

    $OuyaComparison.png
     
  28. BrUnO-XaVIeR

    BrUnO-XaVIeR

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    Hawken on Ouya? Rofl, yeah right... That was just marketing hype, not gonna happen.
    The dev just said they are interested on the console, not that they will try to port a graphics heavy Unreal Engine game to a android device.
     
  29. Ryiah

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    How many of those are good games? The problem with a platform that makes it easy to publish titles is that you run the risk of it getting filled by worthless titles. Quite possibly drowning out the good ones.
     
  30. dogzerx2

    dogzerx2

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    Ouya seems like a great console to mess around and not commit to. I mean if you buy a ps3, in some countries with taxes and all it costs like 600 bux, and then games are like 60-100 bux each, you have to really commit... ouya's super cheap and then you'll have all them free to play games, right? Great console alternative if you don't care about next gen, and settle for ps2 graphics.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2012
  31. Aiursrage2k

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    I guess the biggest the questions are going to be discoverability and the price I mean is it going to be another race to the bottom where its all freemium or 99 cent games.
     
  32. TylerPerry

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    are they just your opinions? cuz I can say, that on most of those I would disagree,

    1. you have Screen Size yet all these are in no way limited by screen size, maybe screen res would be more correct...
    2. PC should be 1 for price, as everyone has a PC and these don't limit things like cloud gaming.
    3. The Wii should be 1 for price as the Wii mini is only $99 like the Ouya, and will thump it in sales.
    4. Game dev is by far the easiest, look at programs like game maker and RPG maker, but for seriousness Unity is easiest on PC and Unity is the easiest so why would it not have 1?
    5. Why would Ouya be the easiest to develop for, false!

    Clearly you have favored the Ouya in these results... I can't blame you, I see you want it to win and so do I but at least give believable results.
     
  33. npsf3000

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    Unless you consider 4.8" phone screen the same as a 40" HD TV then there is a difference.

    No, and no. Not everyone has a PC, and cloud gaming doesn't exist as a serious force ATM.

    Sales are irrelevant to the point of cost. Wii mini is interesting, I've not heard of it before now.

    I assume you mean game dev for pc? Easy - pc has tens of thousands of potential combinations to dev for, while all the other platforms mentioned only have 1*. Far easier to test, debug, optimise and support.

    *Albiet there are some minor differences between some models of consoles, and S3 leads to Android development which is between the two extremes.

    In addition to the above answer, Ouya will be unlikely to have significant cost barriers and can be done [thanks to tools like UT] with an existing dev force that makes mobile and to a lessor extend web and PC games. Compare this to consoles that have restrictions, licenses that are allegedly 6 figures, and require specialised optimisation...

    Assuming a bias because you do not understand my weighting is rash. Ask questions *before* shooting.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2012
  34. TylerPerry

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    None of the others have a screens 4.3 is better then nothing ;). more info my GS2 can connect to TV so I guess so can the GS3, so why cant it use a 40" HD TV?

    I'm willing to say that anyone who is considering a Ouya does indeed have a PC, and the Ouya actually doesn't exist ATM so what is the difference?

    I never said it was, but in terms of worth it is... indeed the Wii mini is interesting :D

    So... its not like it makes much difference, how many times do you try a web player and it doesen't work? I guess it is just as likely that the slight hardware differences will corrupt the game as a webplayer not working(this happened to my Gamecube memory card when put into a Wii) infact, I think more so, if you tailor the game for that exact hardware if something changes (like a Xbox 360 - slim or PS3 - PS3 slim) it could skrew it up, but if you make a game to run on anything aslong as it is x86 then that won't change so there is no problem(or only small problems).

    Ok, but compare it to the open android platform and PC and web... these already exist and work fine, why would a console "require" special optimization? you don't have to do it do you? sure you could make the game run faster on one piece of hardware, but TBH not many will, most people who will have there games on Ouya will have there games on all other platforms and will just change a few things and click the build button.

    True.
     
  35. KRGraphics

    KRGraphics

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    Developing for this Android console means I better START learning how to model SUPER low poly... and this makes me nervous considering how much time and quality I put into my models... but I truly hope this console takes off and does well. Gives me hope that I will be able to test out my creations on this cube... and my other "fear" is my 2 yr old nephew seeing this cool rubiks cube, picking it up and launching it across the room...

    EDIT: Now that I think of it, I can probably make a demo of Project Champion for the Androids, just to see how it would look and perform...
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2012
  36. npsf3000

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    Because when I was figuring out the metrics I decide to go on a rough 'typical use'. A S3 [or iPhone] is not typically used to play games on a big-screen TV, so from a consumer developer perspective it's not really relevant.

    You can't assume that people having an Ouya have a PC because:

    1) They might not.
    2) It may not be able to play games.
    3) Their may be other restrictions [e.g. it is shared, it is owned by company/school, parent based restrictions].
    4) People often think of PC's and consoles [and mobile devices] separately, so even though they own one it's not nessiarily relevant.
    5) Overall I think that metric is too complicated to measure in the time allotted so I left it out - this is *not* the be all and end all of charts, but illustrative of certain metrics.

    The Ouya is basically mass-market ready. Cloud gaming is likely a good 10 years away from being 'significantly accessible' due to physical internet infrastructure problems IMO.

    Plenty of times. The difference between a low end, slightly older PC and a decent gaming PC is *orders of magnitudes* in performance, and several generations of API's, drivers and OS's. To commercially develop and support it is a significant effort - substantially harder than say Ouya when if you write a shader that works on one it will work on all.

    Because you are trying to make the game work on hardware that's a decade out of date? Even if you decided not to do it, odds are you'll fail their testing. I read a while back about a developer's experience - I think even a few frames below 60 FPS [or something] over several hours would be an expensive rejection.

    Lastly, my chart does not consider hypothetical 'you could do's' rather a quick opinion of how things are done. Read my first point :)
     
  37. BBG

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    It's all about the games. If it gets a good selection of exclusive games it could do well. If most of the games are steeped in mediocrity or are just out and out shovelware then it probably won't do well.

    Regardless I will probably buy one to have a tinker with it.
     
  38. PhobicGunner

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    Consider it artist practice. Any self-respecting artist should be able to pull off low poly.

    One thing a lot of people say is "oh but anybody can release a game and that means most of them will be crap"

    I can only point to Kongregate as an example of a completely open game publishing platform. There are quite a few crap games on Kongregate, but due to Kongregate's rating and sorting system they quickly float to the backpages of Kong never to be seen again... replaced on the front pages by some very decent and high quality games. I imagine the OUYA will be the same way.

    And I don't think many existing Android games even CAN be ported unless they already are well suited to gamepad controls (Fruit Ninja, for example, will probably never find it's way to the OUYA).

    Also, somebody mentioned the OUYA having PS2 graphics.... that's not entirely accurate. The OUYA is actually a bit more powerful than the original Xbox, and you can do some pretty awesome things on it ( don't believe me? look up Real Racing 3 )

    And I think a lot of people have missed one of my points.... you keep saying "Oh, but I could just plug my phone into my TV and plug in a USB controller".
    But, first of all, if you don't own one of the few Tegra3 devices available, there's a huge performance gap there. Or, if you do, well there's still a sizable performance gap because your phone has to work overtime to output to several device sources at high resolution. This can actually result in a measurable framerate drop. Plus, even if your game just happens to support gamepad input, chances are there are still thumbstick icons and other buttons cluttering up the in-game HUD, which look ugly when you aren't actually using them ;)
     
  39. PhobicGunner

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    Also, sad to hear that Hawken may not be making it to OUYA :C
    But, on the bright side, Offensive Combat looks pretty badazz. And if they port over Shadowgun: Deadzone.... aw hell yeah.

    On a side note, anybody seen that the world didn't end yesterday?
    Called it. >=D
     
  40. Paradigm-SW

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    What? Hawken not coming to OUYA? Sauce!

    Also, OUYA has competition, pity the competition sucks hard. http://www.indiegogo.com/eSfere
     
  41. PhobicGunner

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    Yeah, saw that one.
    I think while the OUYA brings something different to the table, I don't see the point in eSfere. It still uses touchpad controls (in order to accomodate existing games in the Google store ), and is outputting to two different display devices (which as I've stated before can be a significant strain on system resources).
     
  42. PhobicGunner

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    Also, one reason I want the OUYA to succeed is because I want the creators to be financially successful at this, for one very big reason: I want them to have the financial resources to be able to produce a slightly more expensive OUYA 2.0, perhaps keep the Tegra3 as the main CPU (quad core, hells yeah) and then take it further by stuffing in a fully-featured GeForce graphics card. They could even keep the current iteration around, the OUYA Mini as the current cheaper option and the OUYA BigBox (just to throw out a name) which would be more expensive but have vastly superior graphics tech, maybe a helluva lot of more storage, etc. Would be especially nice if they could maintain compatibility, for example all Mini games could work on BigBox, but some developers could also choose to release BigBox-exclusive games with vastly superior graphics and other features.
    Just some thoughts I had.
     
  43. makeshiftwings

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    Outputting to two screens is not a significant strain on resources. Most of the work the GPU does is 3D math... all the transforms and draw calls and lighting passes and pixel shaders. The final blit of the buffer to the screen is nearly instantaneous. Plugging a second monitor into your PC doesn't cut your frame rate in half; it hardly affects it at all.
     
  44. KRGraphics

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    This is quite interesting...and the original xbox wasn't pushed hard enough... and I would LOVE to make that happen on the OUYA. The gamepad is perfect for my game as well... just gotta see how far I can push the in game graphics...
     
  45. makeshiftwings

    makeshiftwings

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    Those numbers seem awfully suspicious, especially since you've never even seen an Ouya and have no idea how it might work. How can you claim it's the easiest console of all to use when you haven't ever used it? And what exactly makes an Xbox so hard to use? You literally shove the game in the game-hole and it starts it. You don't even have to shove it precisely; it has friendly disc guides to pull the disc into alignment. I've seen five year old kids change Xbox games. The cost should be the same as the Wii, and PC's can have a cost far less than any console, especially if all you want is a PC that can play phone games. Like I said, you could build your own OUYA for less. "Novelty" doesn't make much sense... there's nothing at all novel about the Ouya from a user perspective; it's the most limited of all consoles and has no interesting peripherals. The Wii and PS3 have things like motion controls and cameras; the Xbox has one of the most interesting motion devices ever made. Screen size is irrelevant; you can plug any of those into any size screen. If anything, I'd give the phone a bonus since it actually has its own screen in addition to being pluggable, not a penalty. Ease of dev... you've never deved for it, and we have no idea what their cert process is going to be like yet; how can you be so certain that it will be the easiest console to dev for ever? And I'd completely disagree that dev for the PC is "hard". I understand there are different hardware configs, but these days there's very little that indie game developers do these days to specifically target any particular hardware. There's not much we CAN do. We write to common API's, and if the game breaks on one particular video card out of a hundred, it's the video card manufacturer's fault or the user's for not updating his drivers. In addition, the PC actually is an open platform, unlike the Ouya, so there's no barrier to entry at all.
     
  46. PhobicGunner

    PhobicGunner

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    Ahahahahah - ahem.
    Yes, with PCs this makes almost no difference. WITH PCs.
    With Mobile devices this makes a massive difference.
    http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/df-hardware-how-powerful-is-tegra-3

    Specifically, they say this about HDMI mirroring on mobile devices:
     
  47. makeshiftwings

    makeshiftwings

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    That sounds like a bug with Tegra, not something inherent to splitting video signals. The reviewers there are guessing that the slowdown is due to outputting two video signals but I highly doubt that it is. Outputting the same frame across a second wire does not put strain on the CPU or GPU. Maybe Tegra does some kind of weird upsampling trick to try and make it look better on a high res screen and that's what's causing the lag.
     
  48. PhobicGunner

    PhobicGunner

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    Not sure, but we can still safely say that either you're running on a Tegra device with the video splitting slowdown or you're running on a non-tegra device which is very likely to be a hell of a lot less performant anyway. Either way, the OUYA is still going to be more powerful.

    EDIT: Don't know about the Tegra3, but the Tegra2 didn't do any kind of upsampling at all - nothing more than a simple upscale operation.
     
  49. alexzzzz

    alexzzzz

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    Recently I played with Openbox A1. I plugged it in my TV's HDMI, took the power from the TV's USB connector, and had Android 4 with blackjack and hookers on the 40" screen. It has an air mouse controller and an optional wireless keyboard with a touch-pad.

    What is so special about OUYA?
     
  50. PhobicGunner

    PhobicGunner

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    Well, for starters, I can't seem to find any info on the Openbox, whereas I can find several hundred links with info about the OUYA.

    Does the OpenBox have an overclocked Tegra3 chip? It's own dedicated marketplace for *games* specifically where players can try before they buy on *every* game? A unified gamepad that *all* games can make use of instead of a select few?
     
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