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Who else here is now forced work from home?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Joe-Censored, Mar 17, 2020.

  1. JamesArndt

    JamesArndt

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    Oh I completely agree and you're absolutely right. It will be a new normal. The world and the US will not be the same after 2020. You can bet your savings that the businesses that have lost from this will hedge against this happening to them again. I am not sure if we will see these changes in how they insure or if we'll see these changes trickled down to us consumers. In that case I'd assume that the cost of many types of things will rise next year. One thing I never thought I'd see in my lifetime was the embracing of teleworking. Not that many companies had a choice, but still. They are now forced to create protocols for it, integrate software to enable it, implement schedules and management for teleworking. They are forced to show it can work so now it will either be proven or fail for a lot of industries. How will some of these companies go back to being only "on-site" after this? Last year I came upon story after story of millennials on the job hunt seeking out jobs with remote work options. It's become a highly sought after perk and can be the difference in retaining candidates. Now that employees have gotten a taste of it and companies are being forced to show it works I think we may see a bit of a power shift take place this year. Time will tell. Anything that empowers employees and human beings in the workplace is okay in my book.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2020
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  2. Antypodish

    Antypodish

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    Teleworking does work, as long is in office / site.
    Tele-homeworking is not something that works for long run.
    Most people need be controlled over.
    When they feel a bit of freedom, like being at home for example, they will start slacking and looking for distractions.
    Hence productivity drops.
     
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  3. Murgilod

    Murgilod

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    Damn, simmer down Loki.

     
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  4. JamesArndt

    JamesArndt

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    That's just patently untrue. How do I know this? I've work for NASA as a remote employee at Marshall Space Flight Center. I've never once, over the last two years, stepped foot on Marshall Space Flight Center. I work from a home office in New Smyrna Beach, FL. Our entire team is comprised of remote workers, all creating software for NASA. We span the east coast of Florida to the Midwest in Kansas City, Missouri. I am relatively new to this team, but a majority of the team has worked remotely in this group for 10-20 years, spanning over 5-10 different government contracts. There is no need for anyone to "control us", we are adult professionals with years of experience and we are not here to waste our time, company time or ruin our professional reputations. Our productivity is through the roof most weeks and we utilize a host of tools to enable real time communication via IM, screen sharing, video meetings, voice meetings and email. We have an eextremely well put together management team and hierarchy. I never feel overburdened or pressured, I'm provided with all of the tools to succeed. We have a flexible schedule with a small amount of core hours. We are proof it can be done.

    If further proof was needed, beyond this specific employer. I was also a remote employee for Lockheed Martin working on software databases that trained pilots and astronauts. I worked from my living room in that job, with my children watching Thomas The Train behind my desk chair. My productivity was outstanding and I was pumping out more 3D models and textures than the onsite employees at the nearby facility. In fact I was pumping out artwork for these databases so quickly and reliably that I was loaned out to the Prepar3D simulation team to create artwork for the flight simulator.

    What you are describing is not an issue with people. It's a human resources issue and a flaw in the hiring process of whatever company you are thinking of. If you hire a person who is capable of being an independent worker, self motivated individuals, folks who care about their professional career and reputations and who do not require a hovering manager...well you will be able to provide that initial trust to them. You will be able to gauge their productivity levels. I'm willing to bet their productivity levels will be great. An employee is not the product of an environment, but an environment of distrust can surely ruin an employee. That employee needs to feel and know they can be relied on just as much as the employer needs to know this.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2020
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  5. Antypodish

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    @JamesArndt you speaking from perspective of highly skilled, carefully selected group of people, of which probably large group are contractors. That will be of course skewed and subjective view, toward what you saying. And you may be right, these people, like yourself are effective in what and where they doing. But these people present only small fraction, of global workforce. Not to mention, not everyone like their own work.

    I personally prefer 'freedom' of space, but I know, I wouldn't like stay 100% time at home, working remotely. It would become boring eventually, loosing opportunities of career dev., and whats more. I love be on the road, when I can.

    People tendency is to take advantage, whenever they can.
    Specially obvious in countries, where social is on large skale.
    If motivation is more work = more money, sure it will work.
    When money is constant regardless of done work, people will notice it.

    If you would go outside high skilled professionals, passionate, or self employed groups, you would realize how it is. Crazy stuff happens when no ones watches. I worked with many in past. Don't get me wrong, some are very dedicated, to what they doing.

    While I know range of great engineers personally, form range of fields, I also know range of people, which will do everything, to stay at home and take benefits. And unfortunately size of that second community is far far greater, than high skilled professionals.

    While certainly there are benefits of work at office, despite all above, there is also massive psychological aspect. For example isolating people at home from other work personel. It is not healthy approach in long run.

    And btw, just to be clear, I am not talking about 1-2 days at home, but full time.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2020
  6. Murgilod

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    "Only true geniuses can self regulate" and "people will always take advantage when they can" are both ridiculous and ignore the material conditions that lead to both those situations, material conditions that are rapidly shifting.
     
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  7. keyboardcowboy

    keyboardcowboy

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    Little late to the drive-in discussion - we have one where I live here in Ohio. They officially suspended their season due to virus until further notice. I was looking forward to their opening in a couple of weeks
     
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  8. RecursiveFrog

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    Been working from home for a few weeks now. I admit that I miss my coworkers.
     
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  9. JamesArndt

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    I was only demonstrating that work from home or remote working does work and can work for VERY large agencies. In fact NASA and Lockheed Martin are some of the largest organizations in the world. We're not talking a small group of employees and we're talking about most NOT being contractors, but full time employees such as myself. You're describing the worst type of employees, who I would argue do not even qualify as career professionals. You're comparing something akin to a careless teenager working a Taco Bell drive-thru to a career software developer (nothing wrong with fast food workers). The comparison simply will not work.

    You said I'm speaking from the: "perspective of highly skilled, carefully selected group of people". What were we talking about here? I thought we were talking about employees working within a company, maybe doing software development (as I think it's relevant to software development in the Unity forums). We were not talking about hourly minimum wage workers in customer service jobs. Otherwise how would they transition to work remotely or from home? We were not talking about someone who sweeps the floor or mops bathrooms in a small shop. We were talking about the working professionals who were carefully selected through an interview process. These are people who build their career and experience, build their portfolio and resume and care very much about their professional reputation. We're not talking about someone looking to scam, take advantage of other people or someone looking to steal resources or time from other people or companies. We're talking about a very large workforce of highly skilled people who go through extensive selection processes (via interviews) to be selected for a position.

    I'm a bit taken aback on your opinion of the workforce out in the world. From your perspective most of the workforce are lazy, will take advantage of other people and cannot be trusted. Then you went on to say that they good employees who will actually do work and can be trusted are in a very small group. This is just not accurate. Most people want to do the right thing and want to succeed in their lives. I don't know what reality you're existing in, but let me tell you, it's not good. Working remotely can and does work. There are many opportunities to engage in a social life or social interaction with your co-workers and other people in your life. Working remotely allows folks to actually spend more time with the human beings that truly count, your family and your close friends. If anything it makes you more present and available to these people.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2020
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  10. JamesArndt

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    The company doesn't give you the option to engage with them anymore? Sounds like they may have cut you all off from one another. That isn't going to work in the long term for them. The places I've worked have all encouraged active engagement with co-workers...kind of similar to meeting up with friends on Xbox Live. It doesn't always have to be formal either and can be made to be fun.
     
  11. zombiegorilla

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    I certainly hope for recovery to a degree of normality (for all the obvious reasons, and) because I am huge fan of the movie theater experience (and regular theater) and they are just about to open a brand new AMC a few blocks from me with all the bells and whistles.
     
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  12. Antypodish

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    We may have a dispute about group taken into view and following results.
    But we didn't specified prior any of group. We pointed about "work from home". Not "work from home for highly skilled professionals". Which changes group sample by far.
    Further on, you explained about assumed specified grup. Which is fine.
    I took look at overall as I could, in brief discussion. Not only IT and engineers, but not exclusively. That is why perspective of my view and experience from various of industry on the matter, differs from yours.

    I am actually happy where I am and thats what matter for me.
    With all respect, but assuming not knowing anything about person and stating, is plain wrong.
     
  13. JamesArndt

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    I was only going off of what I know from how you are referring to "most people". You've overgeneralized most working people as lazy, not to be trusted, and that they'd take advantage of someone the moment they had a chance. I'm saying that is a very bleak outlook you have on people or maybe the world around you. I don't know you, but I can tell from your writings that you are not a trusting individual. I'm going to spoil something about managing people for you. The trust issue is with yourself, not the bulk of people out there! Now I don't know how you got there, and I am not here to judge you. I am talking about workers in an office scenario for whom working remotely would not be an option. I'm not talking about millions of other customer service jobs, restaurant jobs, or jobs where working remotely is possible. My entire team and my past co-workers from other companies are proof that with the right management, the right hiring practices and the right people remote working can work beautifully. I'm sure it doesn't work for folks who'd rather not be working at all. In that case why even sample those folks in the first place. It does work and it's proven to work, but it has to fit into the culture of that organization and the people they hire.
     
  14. zombiegorilla

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    Folks, please, let's keep tone down the arguing. We all have different experiences.
     
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  15. Antypodish

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    I thought we just discussing (maybe a bit aloud). I am not upset at @JamesArndt, just to be clear. But ok, I will drop the subject, just in case to not upset anyone else.
    Apology for noise :)
     
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  16. JamesArndt

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    I'm not upset either. I was only trying to clarify my thoughts and perception on the matter. No harm done. Maybe I'm a little too Gary Vee!
     
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  17. RecursiveFrog

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    Far from it, we are well connected online and work as normal.

    I just like my coworkers and miss spending time with them.
     
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  18. hippocoder

    hippocoder

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    Well the best thing to do is be apolitical and think about humans surviving. That's what I do. I don't care about country nor creed or blame.

    This thread's about working from home and making the best of that situation. Sadly a lot of people like me probably spent too much time at home or on computers so our lives do not change much.

    Perhaps we can leave insights for others like using this time to not go on social media too much. It's a mind killer. That's my tip. Instead encourage kids to get into that time consuming thing called game development. Or take time to try out VR, as a family wide exercise. Alyx is here. Try it!

    I once said a thing about VR and that was "It's like a holiday..." and you know it can be. So there's my tips. Try something new. Keep active. Stay away from social media.

    Good luck, be well.
     
  19. zombiegorilla

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    I was fortunate when I started working from home, The team I joined had been doing it for several years and were extremely supportive and full of tips.

    Everyone is different, and has a different situation, but the biggest insight that helped me was to have a designated work area, and don't do "not work" there. Social media, random surfing, etc, I don't do any of that in my work area. Even the forums are not logged in on my work computer. If I am not in a creative mood or just not feeling like working, I move away from workstation. Very quickly it created a nice separation early on.
     
  20. JamesArndt

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    Ah so do you mean like physically touching them or physically looking at them in person? Just trying to understand. I suppose I'm so severely introverted that it sounds strange to me. I don't get anything from interacting with a person "in person" that I don't get from interacting online. I mean I think I lose the ability to smell them and things like that, but I find it unimportant to my experience.
     
  21. ippdev

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    I seem to lose the ability to remember names quickly from not exercising the social interaction functions of the brain. But I can remember all the calls from the physics API..so it ain't early onset Alzheimers..
     
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  22. superpig

    superpig

    Drink more water! Unity Technologies

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    Working from home, here :)

    We stopped all travel to/from Unity's offices in Asia back in early February, and as things got worse we started closing offices and telling people to WFH - basically everybody across the company has been working from home for a week or two now. (We're also taking care of the folks whose jobs don't really make sense from home, like the teams that do the catered lunches in the offices).

    Because Unity's so distributed globally, we've been fairly well equipped for this from an infra point of view; we already have Slack, Zoom, VPN logins, etc. The challenging part for most people hasn't been technology, it's been the mental stuff - trying to be as focused at home as you are in the office is tough, especially when you have the rest of your family around you. Not everyone has a good 'workspace' at home either - some folks have had to get a bit creative. There's a very healthy flow of people sharing advice, from 'it's best to get dressed like you usually do, don't work in your pyjamas all day' to ideas for daily schedules for kids, etc. Even the execs are participating, sharing their experiences and advice.

    And yeah, missing out on having your coworkers around you is also a problem. It's partly the reduced bandwidth of information - Slack is fine but things like tone of voice and facial expressions do matter - but also the 'incidental' stuff, the conversations you overhear while you're waiting for the coffee machine, the people you happen to sit next to at lunch, etc.

    People are experimenting a lot with ways of compensating for that - from organising daily video calls on a team, to keeping a Discord voice server open. Someone set up a Slack channel where a bot will 'matchmake' you randomly with a group of other people from your timezone, so then you set up a video call with them just to say hi and chat a bit. The various weekly office drink events have also been quickly replaced with people raising a glass/bottle to their webcams at home :D
     
  23. JamesArndt

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    Yep. Last year I bought a new home and I actually made sure to buy a house that had a room that I could make into an office. I'm a career teleworker, so this is a lifelong thing for me. I can also afford to do that. I totally understand if folks are not already set up with that luxury and cannot afford to immediately pivot over to finding an office. Man they must be getting really creative! At one point or another I've worked out of a closet, I've worked in a garage and I've worked in my living room next the kid's play space.
     
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  24. Ony

    Ony

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    Physical connection is important, and the more people turn to purely online connection, the worse off we will be. Everyone is an individual, of course, so if pure digital communication works for you then by all means use it, but humans as a whole need physical touch.

    "Interpersonal touch has important social and affective values. Specifically, skin-to-skin touch contributes to the development of premature infants, regulates their stress responses, provides comfort and emotional well-being and has an analgesic effect34. Physiologically, interpersonal touch increases the coupling of electrodermal activity and pulse rate variability and modulates blood pressure reactivity to stress as well as reactivity to distress." - source

    Also, this article with references. Also many others, but it's breakfast time so I'm off.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2020
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  25. JamesArndt

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    Hmm that is interesting. I'm likely a product of the situation I grew up in and not the norm. However at most workplaces I've been we were not exactly encouraged to physically touch other folks at work. I think at Lockheed we were even warned against touching other people in the workplace (green zone, yellow zone, red zone). So maybe this whole needing physical touch thing is more about your at home and private interactions more than it is about the workplace. I wouldn't say as part of my job fulfillment I am missing out on being able to physically touch my co-workers. So my statement still stands. I am not losing anything from my interaction with co-workers being online only. At least I don't feel that way.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2020
  26. zombiegorilla

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    Yea... so... living (stupidly) in the heart of SV, I have silly small apartment. My "workspace" is literally just a separate desk, next to my art desk in my kitchen/dining room. My work workspace is pretty much just turning around to a different monitor/keyboard setup.

    Several of my friends have full work offices, others none at all. I need to have some separation. One of my friends just uses his couch, but he is more disciplined. My producer had a seperate office, then he had a baby, so he moved to the local coffee shop. Then the virus, so now he just shares with his daughter. (which is actually pretty adorable during meetings, she is just old enough to fascinated by the faces on the screen and giggles and points.)

    --

    I actually have been "missing" my coworkers as well. Being fully remote, we normally spend a week together at an onsite once a quarter. Usually Stockholm, but also other parts of Sweden and the Netherlands. Our primary contract/publisher recently changed to one in London, so we were supposed to have an onsite there, but it got delayed for a few months because of uncertainty with Brexit, and now cancelled until further notice. Usually we see each other IRL every three months, but our last trip was last Oct.
     
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  27. Antypodish

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    In most work places touching is probably not something common, or may be even perceived in wrong way.
    However, close person-person contact, facial expressions, shaking hand and even slapping in the back in positive way, is fairly common and can be highly motivating. Also, as already mentioned, it is instant information conveying, which is very important in many type of business.
     
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  28. JamesArndt

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    Yes as I was referring to Lockheed Martin. If I recall they discouraged touching anyone's back, hugging, or any kind of interpersonal touching. Too many lawsuits where what was appropriate in male to male contact, wasn't for male to female contact. I think they allowed handshakes, but people don't tend to go around their office shaking hands all day long. It would be weird :) So needless to say we didn't have a lot of physical contact. Facial gestures, body language can all be perceived very well through HD video conferencing or streams. In fact I've interviewed a few times over video stream and you could instantly perceive emotions and thought through the face, you could gauge relaxation levels or stress from body language.

    So I'm honestly curious, other than physically touching an employee what is it that is present "in-person" that is missing over an HD video stream of that same person? Assuming you can clearly see their face and upper body in the video. All I can think that you might not be able to experience is how the person smells, maybe some finer details in the texture of their clothing, extremely subtle clues in facial muscles or body posture. In my mind I'm thinking very subtle, almost imperceptible visual cues that wouldn't be too useful in most day to day interactions.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2020
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  29. Ony

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    There are also chemicals that transfer between people in physical spaces. It's not just about actual touch. Being in the same space with someone else is what we need as humans. Even when it comes to the simple sharing of germs by being close to one another, we build up immunity. Without that closeness we don't get the diversity of bacteria, and we won't thrive. There is no real comparison between online and offline where it balances out. The further down the road we go towards eschewing physical contact, the worse it will be for human kind.

    I'm all for working at home, but I'm not a fan of the modern day "I don't need to be in physical proximity to anyone, so I'll just isolate myself" idea. I'm sort of a combo tech-nerd-Luddite, I suppose. If someone is a true anthropophobic, sure, but I don't think that's as common as the internet makes it out to be. Social media would certainly like to change that, though.

    I'm ranting, I know. And possibly off topic, but it is about "missing working with other people around", and not really about giving someone an inappropriate hug at the office.
     
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  30. BIGTIMEMASTER

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    The need for human connection (and physical proximity) is well documented scientifically.

    Some people prefer more frequency than others, and that is something human-minded managers have to account for.
     
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  31. zombiegorilla

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    Many things. We live all over the world, so I literally had never met any of the people I worked with. It was 3 months before I did. Meeting them in meat space completely changes your perception. Even with regular (4-5 days a week) meetings via VC, we only talk as a group, and it is work related and not ideal, given the globe nature of our reality, I am frequently chating with our engineers, as they are at the end of the day, I have just woken up. And often people are curt and/or formal on VC, relationships are very different once you recognize other are real humans. (both hippo and angrypenguin sound wayyyy different IRL than in my head).

    But more importantly is what we refer to as Social Capital. We are a small indie(ish) studio, there is a certain commaradire that you get working with others in a office, that we don't with others on a screen. We are passionate and in this all together and meeting those folks massively increased that bond and passion. When we onsite, we all stay together in the same hotel far from home and spend 5-6 full days together. Meals, pubs, touristy things, pubs, walks, pubs, shopping and pubs.

    Being we are all about the same age, big geeks and even the least experienced of us has been a professional in the industry for well over decade (much more in some cases, its fun when you discover that your coworkers have worked on many of your favorite games ever), we unsurprisingly have a ton of things incommon, (except native language). Board games are huge part as well, we spend nearly as much time working as playing board games at on onsites. (our last trip, we were on an island in Sweden in a converted ancient church and military base, drinking and playing obscure board/card games while sun set over the ocean... it was kinda epic)

    But even on the work side, we tend to use the entire onsite for planning and design meetings. A few hours in group with a white board is easily 10x more productive than a email chain, or VC.

    I am not a very social person most of the time, but when I am, I am bit of extrovert. The feast/famine set up of remote work is perfection for me. I get the flexibility of working on my own most of the time, then get a huge burst of "other people" all at once. Plus board games over VC suck... not so much in a board game cafe/pub in Stockholm.
     
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  32. angrypenguin

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    I'm actually finding lately that I'm more productive on my couch with my laptop than I am in my office with my dual-screen desktop and a purpose-built work environment.

    I think it's because when I'm in there my time is divided between different work which competes for attention, where on my laptop there is only one project.

    Is this normal for this to be a thing people are formally taught? Maybe I was taught it so long ago I just don't remember it. I guess if Lockheed is a multicultural workplace it makes sense, though, as social etiquette about these things varies from culture to culture.

    In any case, the point isn't that you need to physically go around touching your workmates. It's that bonds form when you spend time in physical promximity to people, and that the occasional physical touch - handshakes when you meet people, high-fives in moments of celebration, clinking glasses together over a drink - helps to consolidate that bond. I also suspect that making deliberate, physical contact helps get the important relationships to fit within your Dunbar's Number. (Whether or not Dunbar's Number is valid, we've certainly only got enough time / effort to maintain a finite number of relationships in our lives.)
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2020
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  33. zombiegorilla

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    Heh... I missed this. Are those "zones" parts of the body, or locations in the office?
     
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  34. Billy4184

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    I'm a bit similar. I prefer to work without others around (preferably at all), but when I am doing something social I do not want anything to do with the internet.

    I work from home, and I usually feel the need to go out and about in the afternoon/night. With everything pretty much shutting down around here after midday now (Australia) a good bit of social/physical proximity is going to be harder to come by.

    Sounds like some kind of 1984 sex ed class. I don't know where these sorts of ideas come from in this day and age. Reducing human contact to a number of spatial zones with associated risk values sounds like some kind of early-alpha android OS implementation.
     
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  35. UnityMaru

    UnityMaru

    Community Engagement Manager Unity Technologies

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    Working from home and to be honest, I don't like it. I like to be around people and it's making me rather miserable that I can't do that for a while :(
     
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  36. unit_dev123

    unit_dev123

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    I am very sorry to hear this sir, I hope it will end soon but it could be many months. I wish you a speedy recovery.
     
  37. chingwa

    chingwa

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    You mean there are real people outside of these walls?
     
  38. Kiwasi

    Kiwasi

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    You haven't seen my browser tabs at work...

    Most workers aren't that productive in the office either. In fact there is a tendency for a lot of busy work in the office to make people look important. I'm fully convinced that most of the staff in my office could get their jobs done in four hours and go home if the culture just stopped rewarding hours at work and started rewarding work done. Plus losing the commute would be great.

    A lot of it comes from just general physical proximity. If you are near someone, you are more likely to chat idly with them. Idle chat tends to strengthen relationships. And it tends to occasionally produce random ideas and collaborations.

    My industry isn't programming, so its probably different. But a lot of my work arises from just overhearing what's going on in the office. People complain about an issue, so I fix it. Its much harder to produce this type of laissez faire collaboration in an online environment. But I can see this being significantly less important in a less people focused industry.
     
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  39. JamesArndt

    JamesArndt

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    Ah okay I see, that makes sense. That is probably why I didn't place personal significance on it, it's really played no role at all in most of my government contract work. Most of us can't share or shouldn't share what we're working on and everyone is segmented, working on different sensitive projects. I will say we have chatted about high level production techniques for developing real time assets, but it's nothing ground-breaking that I couldn't do over Microsoft Teams or an email. So I just don't have experience in being in a job where physical proximity to people helped me do my work better. I think most places I've been, too much idle chat, too much grouping up (when not in an actual meeting) has been frowned upon. I suppose in more openly creative spaces, its probably encouraged. And I agree, most of my work has revolved around deliverable products and not so much people.
     
  40. angrypenguin

    angrypenguin

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    Lots of people are in a similar situation. That doesn't make it suck any less, but hopefully it means that the setback isn't so big comparatively speaking.

    My advice there would be to make sure you use this time wisely. Don't sit on your laurels, make sure you use the extra time it gets you to increase your value for when things start to pick up again.
     
    Antypodish, Kiwasi and Ony like this.
  41. BIGTIMEMASTER

    BIGTIMEMASTER

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    how you know it screwed your future up when it hasn't even happened yet.
     
  42. Billy4184

    Billy4184

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    I think now is a good time to take advantage of Unity's gift of free access to Premium learning materials.
     
    Ony likes this.
  43. Murgilod

    Murgilod

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    People are capable of analyzing their own material conditions and they context they exist under.
     
  44. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    Posts:
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    Have you tried applying for any jobs as a junior developer rather than as an intern? I'm not that familiar with internship laws even for my own area but it wouldn't surprise me if the negatives outweighed the positives for the companies you're applied for and they would much rather have a junior developer.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2020
    TonicMind likes this.
  45. BIGTIMEMASTER

    BIGTIMEMASTER

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    some people always be acting a fool
     
    TonicMind likes this.
  46. Murgilod

    Murgilod

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    Don't sign your posts.
     
  47. Billy4184

    Billy4184

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    As a rule I believe this to be wildly untrue. Taking action and operating on honest trial and error is the only real way to combat the mind's tendency to analyze everything toward a negative conclusion.
     
  48. Murgilod

    Murgilod

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    Most people who have to analyze their material conditions and context in the first place are doing so because they can not afford to do otherwise.
     
  49. Billy4184

    Billy4184

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    That doesn't mean the outcome of the analysis is useful. Taking action and monitoring its effect is always better, because the world doesn't lie as easily as one can to oneself.
     
  50. Murgilod

    Murgilod

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2013
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    Okay, let's use an example.

    It's the middle of a global pandemic. In January, a person's disability support was cut off, meaning that their income has dropped to effectively zero because their only supplementary income was contract work doing hiring and data analysis. This work was rare enough before the economic realities of the pandemic set in. The nature of their disability means that they are unable to function in a traditional workplace. They do not have family or people they know locally to rely on for financial support.

    To add to this, the pandemic has shut down a lot of key government services, including severe delays to the appeals process and the emergency funding extension process. On April 1st, they will be receiving their final payment. Their bank balance is enough that they can pay rent for one month after that and no more.

    Tell me, what trial and error process can this person afford to take?
     
    ippdev likes this.
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