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Who else here is now forced work from home?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Joe-Censored, Mar 17, 2020.

  1. Joe-Censored

    Joe-Censored

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    Due to a certain human malware and local government response I'm now forced to work from home, shelter in place for the next few weeks. I plan to get a lot of work in on my current Unity project now that I don't have my usual 3+ hours of commute traffic each day. Anyone else in the same boat? And if so, you planning to get more work done on personal game projects?
     
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  2. APSchmidt

    APSchmidt

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    Lucky you, I cannot work from home, I must go to my work place, with the police watching my movements. I'll be happy if they don't forbid me to work, leaving me pennyless.
     
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  3. ippdev

    ippdev

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    Was going to start a new gig from home for a NYC company. Now, no go as they are not having office meetings for the foreseeable future. Needed the cash too.
     
  4. jbnlwilliams1

    jbnlwilliams1

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    I can work at home at certain times. This will not allow me to work more on personal unity projects as i have to , you know, work, when i am working from home...
     
  5. XCPU

    XCPU

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    Likely about a day or two away from starting remote work because of this,
    and will also save about 3 hours commute, I look at it like 3 hours uninterrupted
    at home is worth 8+ hours in the office when it comes to programming.
    Lots of work on my personal project could get done.
     
  6. neginfinity

    neginfinity

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    Always worked at home, pretty much. So little changes, aside from watching people hoard stuff.
     
  7. BIGTIMEMASTER

    BIGTIMEMASTER

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    No changes for me, but I am doubting this will only be a few weeks. I expect several months.
     
  8. angrypenguin

    angrypenguin

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    I imagine it could save a bunch of commute time, at least?

    But yes, I hope that nobody's under the impression that "work from home" = "time off".

    Fingers crossed that something good comes of all this. Hopefully some managers learn that big expensive air-conditioned offices which people need to make daily commutes to aren't actually a necessity. I wonder how much time, energy and other resources can be saved by people being a little less traditionalist on such things?
     
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  9. zombiegorilla

    zombiegorilla

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    Been working remotely for 3 years, no change here, except our county is on on lock down, so we are not even to go outside right now.
     
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  10. Ony

    Ony

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    I've been working at home for twenty years now so it's business as usual. Hope people who aren't used to it can make things work. I wish everyone the best.
     
  11. angrypenguin

    angrypenguin

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    Me too. I'm used to it and work from home two days a week myself already. I used to work from home all the time, and the one adjustment I had to make was putting conscious effort into getting out of the house, just going for walks and such.

    I think the catch for a lot of people will be that even those excursions may have to be limited. Though under those circumstances I'd personally prefer to have work to focus on than not...

    Tricky times.
     
  12. GoesTo11

    GoesTo11

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    My wife and I have both stopped working after strong recommendations from a couple of our professional organizations. So I'll be working on my Unity projects at home for the foreseeable future.
     
  13. N1warhead

    N1warhead

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    I'm fortunate that even if we go on lock down in my area - most of my area is wooded. So if I really need food that bad I'll just go out and hunt it. But things aside from that is business as usual for me as well as I work from home as well.

    I got a river next to me, and plenty of wildlife. So i'm fortunate enough to be in a position of not starving and going thirsty if push comes to shove with no food and water to be found.
     
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  14. TonicMind

    TonicMind

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    With ports taking in fewer "stuff" it's definitely a semi-concern. At the same time, hoarding/panic purchasing is dumb for many a reason... One of them being that those living hand to mouth are now spending what little they have to avoid going hungry, meanwhile they are not going to have rent money. I can't tell you how many people I've seen moving out in just the last week. People are freaking out because the government is (for one thing) taking a heavy-handed approach to things. Typical CA; cities ordering "shelter in place" --an overreaction. Pandemic it may be but unless you are 80+ years old or immunocompromised your chance of dying is minimal. People think in terms of black and white. "its a pandemic; so panic". Unless someone is shooting at you, its best NOT to panic regardless. I can go a few days (as can most) eating little. Dunno why people feel they need to worry so much about that...

    Fun fact: Polio had about three different "waves" of infection. Learned that from a YT video about a guy who (to this day) is in an iron lung. I sort of expect this to be the new normal for the foreseeable future...
     
  15. Acissathar

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    I do business software as a day job and although nearly everyone is set up and able to be remote, they’re still making everyone come into the office.

    The current policy is keep coming in until someone in your department is diagnosed, and then you’ll be sent to work remote.
     
  16. BIGTIMEMASTER

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    You better educate these people. The virus incubates for like two weeks before any symptoms appear.
     
  17. Acissathar

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    They are aware, they are just very opposed to remote work. They’d rather you just use all of your yearly PTO instead of remoting in. I don’t understand why, and the closest I’ve gotten is that they themselves don’t like working from home.
     
  18. APSchmidt

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    "The “incubation period” means the time between catching the virus and beginning to have symptoms of the disease. Most estimates of the incubation period for COVID-19 range from 1-14 days, most commonly around five days. These estimates will be updated as more data become available."
    https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses
     
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  19. Ryiah

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    Nothing has changed in my own circumstances. My niece and nephews who live in the same building are a completely different situation though. Schools have closed for the foreseeable future and everything is now a little more noisy than before and once they're bored of staying home it's likely to get a bit worse.
     
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  20. BIGTIMEMASTER

    BIGTIMEMASTER

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    @Acissathar

    are they more opposed to remote work than killing people?

    Seriously, spend half and hour at the site @APSchmidt linked and you'll understand why everybody needs to take it serious. It's important. Don't let other people force you to be a buddy F***er along with them.
     
  21. Voronoi

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    University is closed, we are all teaching remotely now. Previously worked 20 years from home, so I'll be fine. Students are having a hard time, many have lost their jobs with all the restaurants closing. I'm encouraging them to look at this as a good time to focus on a project, gives them something to do and lots of time to focus.
     
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  22. JamesArndt

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    Been remotely working now for the last 3-4 years so nothing changes work-wise. However we are all cooped in the house, no school going on, not going out to stores or restaurants. Our entire agency (NASA) went telework this week (non-critical all centers), which is just nuts. I happen to be on a team out of Marshall Space Flight Center that have always been teleworkers.
     
  23. Antypodish

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    Robots and AI to the rescue:cool:

    Just wonder, where will this quote fit this days ...
    We need replace with ...
    :D
     
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  24. BIGTIMEMASTER

    BIGTIMEMASTER

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    A great time for people to release tutorials, games, or anything to help others make use of down time.
     
  25. Baste

    Baste

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    I've gone from 1 day a week working from home to 5.

    Spent a bunch of time setting up remote access for the team members that doesn't usually work from home. We're all working from home now, with the exception of two people.

    Surprisingly little friction this far, though it remains to be seen how production speed changes. I know it's a major pain to not be able to talk directly to people I'm collaborating with, but since we set up a policy that everybody needs to be available for voice chat over Discord in the core hours, it seems like I'm just as able to collaborate.

    So all together it seems like it's going to be just fine. Unless we start dying off.
     
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  26. JamesArndt

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    Yep we use Microsoft Teams now to do meetings and one on one voice and discussions. We also share and upload files using it and present desktops with it. Once you get used to it, it becomes as productive as an in-person experience.
     
  27. aer0ace

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    I'm in software as a day job, and we are still coming into the office. I don't think we have VPN infrastructure set up though. But it's a company culture thing; we are only a fraction of the business, the other part does manufacturing for a lot of the supplies for automated instruments used to run blood sample tests, so they are getting slammed, to the point that we are being asked to help.

    But again, I think it'll be another case of waiting till it gets really bad where we are before greater precautions are taken.


    Oh, did I start the discussion too early last week? I tried to start a thread along these lines, but things have changed so quickly, and the thread got torpedoed to S***. Probably because it was just a blanket question. Yes I'm bitter, but I hope this time around, this thread can be kept on topic.

    Please, everyone stay safe and don't get this thread locked.
     
  28. APSchmidt

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    It will be too late for precautions then.
     
  29. BIGTIMEMASTER

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    The issue is that healthcare systems have limited capacity. So if everybody all gets sick at once, then care has to be prioritized selectively. Which means healthcare professionals have to decide who lives and who dies, in many cases. It is happening in Italy right now, you can read about it; and you all ought to stop making assumptions and speculations and get educated by going to relevant websites like the CDC, NIH, and WHO.

    All the people either freaking out or doing the opposite and trying to make light of the situation are acting like dumb monkeys. Just get educated so you can know what to do. Then it doesn't matter how you feel. That's not important at all.
     
  30. Kiwasi

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    Not yet. I'm considered part of the essential services. I work in the food supply chain. You think supermarkets are bad right now, if I stop showing up to work things will get dramatically worse. And unfortunately due to the nature of my work right now, it can't really be done outside the factory. So if we close, I'm at home on my own with no money coming in. That's going to be fun... Particularly because my immigration status partially depends on maintaining an income.

    The silver lining is I will have plenty of time to work on games. Its been a long time since I've had solid week long blocks to build stuff. Which I guess is a positive.
     
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  31. zombiegorilla

    zombiegorilla

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    I thought this was going to be a challenge as well. I walk at least a hour every day. Sometimes for shopping, but most often for exercise and remind me there is an outside. When we got the notice that our county was under order to shelter-in-place, "going for walks" was specifically listed under as necessary. It is good for health (both physical and mental). It says just maintain 6ft distance.
    The odd thing is, that in the last few days, I have talked to several people out walking. We do a little dance to avoid each other, giggle about it and have a nice chat. Some of them I have lived near for many years and never talked to. Strange bright side.
     
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  32. zombiegorilla

    zombiegorilla

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    THIS.^
    The idea that "i'm under 80, so it is ok" is sheer idiocy. "at risk" includes people with history of respiratory problems regardless of age. And moreover placing your connivence over others is inhumane. While you might not die of it, you can kill someone by being carless. A good chunk of my family work in the health care industry, most of them are massively concerned (contingency plans are ugly and terrible). Resources are limited and we often rely on sharing of resources (human and otherwise) when there is a localized emergency, (fire, mass shooting, big car accident, etc). The healthcare system is fragile and doesn't scale well, especially all at once. While you many not die of contracting the virus, in the coming weeks you could die in a car accident or household accident because healthcare is way beyond capacity. Obviously panicking is not helpful, but being stupid is probably worse.

    Everyone be smart and take care. If you can help others safely, please do.

    Note: this is forum about game development and using unity. Supporting our fellow developers is good and not discouraged. However, spreading misinformation or any other nonsense in these trying times will be shut down immediately.
     
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  33. Murgilod

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    Half of the confirmed cases in New York City are under fifty and a good deal of them were perfectly healthy.

    Turns out that a lot of the assumptions about covid-19 were wrong.
     
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  34. Billy4184

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    I think that point was about the risk of dying from the virus, not getting it to begin with. I'm not going to make any wild assertions, but it does seem apparent to me that for many people, the virus itself is going to be the least of their problems.

    No change for me as I've been working online and selling on the asset store for some time. Except for trying to figure out how to intercept new supplies of pasta and rice at the supermarket.
     
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  35. Murgilod

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    It'll be extremely worth watching the numbers as they come in over the next few weeks, because that's probably not going to hold true. Confirmed cases in the US and Canada have only really started coming in in earnest as the pandemic progresses.
     
  36. angrypenguin

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    RIght, but "confirmed cases" is important there. Everyone's criteria for doing the tests is different based on availability of kits, logistics, and such, so it's entirely likely that the confirmed cases are skewed towards the worst cases. We have no idea about how mild cases are distributed or even how many there are, which is a huge blind spot.

    Personally I think the long term economic effects are separately highly concerning in their own right. For instance, our largest airliner has just indefinitely put 20,000 staff members on leave, which will be unpaid once they run out of leave benefits. That's just one employer, and there are many others. That's just the short term impact, too. What's Kleenex going to do when all the hoarders stop buying toilet paper because they already have a 12 month supply and things return to normal? There'll be lagged impacts there, too.

    And to bring that home to us as game developers... well, right now people are spending record amounts of time on Steam etc. as they're told to sit on their couch for a fortnight. But when the economic impact catches up how many gamers won't be able to afford games for a while?

    Games are non-essential, so I'm not worried from that perspective, but they employ a lot of people, which could mean yet another lagged economic impact...

    I just hope that in additon to all the sucky stuff that's coming this also shakes off the complacency many people seem to have.
     
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  37. Billy4184

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    It's possible, but considering the fatality rate overall, and the fact that (far as I know) the biggest risk factor is immune system problems, it stands to reason that if you're reasonably healthy the risk of becoming seriously ill is not high at all.

    Personally I'm not worried so much about my own health, but the risk of transferring it to people who aren't in the best shape. My grandparents are in their 90s, and here in Australia, every one of the deaths so far has been over 77 years of age.

    I just wonder what the effect of all these measures are going to be on people already living financially on the edge in places that don't have generous social security systems in place. It's easy to just say 'lock it all down' but people have to feed themselves and their families. If this goes on for 6 months or a year (or more) I wonder how many non-virus-related casualties there will be.
     
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  38. zombiegorilla

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    Indeed. Entertainment industries tend to weather bumps in the economy fairly well. But long term hasn't been significantly tested. And also, many developers rely on third party revenue, specifically ads. How will that hold up long term once the industries buying ads start suffering? We all stand a better chance of surviving (physically and economically) if we don't behave like idiots and use some sound caution.
     
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  39. Ryiah

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    They might just have to play all those games they bought during Steam sales but never got around to playing. :p
     
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  40. Murgilod

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    What I'm interested in seeing is how things like movie theatres fare. Pretty much all of the major chain ones here have been shut down, and it's likely that's going to continue for some time. On top of that, a lot of film production is currently on indefinite hiatus. When you couple that with the major powerhouse franchises (MCU, Star Wars, etc.) in their dip periods, and with the pandemic putting a major focus on home entertainment... that's kinda a lot for modern theatres to have to deal with.
     
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  41. Kiwasi

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    Respiratory problems are big too. Anyone with asthma is in danger without medical treatment. And given that this thing is likely to affect more people than most countries have ventilators available for, things will get ugly.

    Really? The local arts and entertainment industry has probably been the hardest hit so far. Concerts shut down. Events cancelled left right and center. Movie productions put on hold indefinitely.

    I haven't seen game devs panicking yet. But I really can't see them being far behind.
     
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  42. Murgilod

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    Videogames don't typically hinge on in-person social situations or even really leaving the home as a prerequisite.
     
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  43. aer0ace

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    Right. Maybe back in the 80s when arcades were totally radical.
     
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  44. zombiegorilla

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    Economic bumps. Yea, this is different. But even so, it should be noted, that while new movie and filmed entertainment is temporarily on hold, they are one of the smallest sectors of entertainment. Books (print and digital) is about 4x the size of movie revenue, Video games are a bit less than books. TV/streaming is the largest segment at nearly 100b (10x that of movies). Music is around 20b, (a sizable chunk of which comes from live events). And practically speaking, sheerly from an economic view, while a new Avengers movie may have what appears to be a large box office, it is nothing compared to what is made on stuffed Olaf dolls. (when our SW game broke 500million, we learned at in same year, Frozen pillowcases made more than that. sobering.) Of course with films, that number above is just ticket sales, not theater revenue, but still.
     
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  45. zombiegorilla

    zombiegorilla

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    Many areas of video game revenue is up. Not surprisingly, retail (physical) sales are way down. So... if you are relying on selling boxed copies of your game at Walmart... you may be in trouble. ;)
     
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  46. JamesArndt

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    They are likely bleeding money at this point. As well the industries that support them. It occurred to me that it would have been a good idea to keep a few "drive-ins" from back in the day around. You could watch a movie and never get out of your car. I saw the early 90's Keaton Batman film in a drive-in theater down here in Florida.
     
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  47. Ryiah

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    There were around 330 drive-in theaters in the US back in 2017.

    https://web.archive.org/web/2017060...ertainment/drivein-theater-open-find-location

    We're down to around 300 now, but this crisis is causing them to see a resurgence in popularity. If this virus lasts for months rather than weeks I wonder if we won't see companies trying to rapidly assemble new drive-ins.

    https://thehill.com/blogs/blog-brie...ie-theaters-see-resurgence-during-coronavirus
     
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  48. Ony

    Ony

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    We went and saw "Gravity" at the drive in when that came out (damn, was that really seven years ago????). French fries, hamburgers, movies, and sitting in the car. Good times. :)
     
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  49. JamesArndt

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    I'm blown away that there are still that many around. That's pretty awesome though. Maybe as you said we'll see a resurgence in their popularity. We know from experience that many businesses are going to hedge against taking this kind of hit ever again. I believe we'll see many industries change because that.
    Not that you or I are old, but it does seem as we age that time goes by much faster. If I were to have mentioned that film in a conversation it would have been, "Oh yeah we saw that a couple years ago. Really great film.". I find myself doing this for many different things and then my SO will speak up and say, "James, that was 11 years ago." I'll then have a dumbfounded look on my face and have to think for a moment. As a side note: That was a trippy film and burgers and fries sound great. You painted a visual there for me and it took me back to some nostalgic moment in time.
     
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  50. Murgilod

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    It's not just that theatres are bleeding money, but the effect this is all going to have on people who are affected by this. Getting people back into theatres after the new normal has pushed people even more towards home media is going to be a pretty big issue.
     
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