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Using different subscription plans when working together

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by TheOlko, Aug 13, 2019.

  1. TheOlko

    TheOlko

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    Oct 18, 2015
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    If I understand the EULA correctly you cannot use Unity with different subscription plans in the same project. What does this mean when working together with different independent developers?

    Let's assume that I own a plus or pro subscription that I also use for my own projects. Does this prevent me from contributing to an open source game written in unity? Most collabortators of such a project probably just use the personal edition. What about joining a team for a game jam, if the other team members all use personal editions?

    I thought I can just solve this problem, by installing multiple versions of unity with different subscription levels for different projects. However this seems not to be allowed.

    To me it seems, that upgrading my unity license would prevent me from working with lots of people. Am I missing something?
     
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  2. TonyLi

    TonyLi

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    That certainly seems like an unintended loophole in their EULA. I posted what Unity's Legal team called their definitive word here. But of course another user immediately posted some examples that fall through the cracks. And this would seem to be another one. If you want to be sure, email support@unity.com. I can't imagine Legal would frown upon a Pro subscriber contributing to an open source project. I'm sure most Unity employees themselves would be in violation in that case. But it would make sense that you're not allowed to use your Pro version to make builds for the project if the rest of the team isn't also on Pro. The purpose of the regulation is to prevent, say, 200-employee companies from buying one Pro subscription to make their builds and keeping everyone else on the free version.
     
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  3. Joe-Censored

    Joe-Censored

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    You can have multiple accounts with different subscription tiers. Log out and log in with the correct account for the project you're working on to match the subscription tier of the other contributors.

    A EULA is no more powerful than its enforcement though. I'm not advising this, but I highly doubt Unity's legal team is hunting down and taking legal action against their own paying customers because their license tier is too high to contribute to some open source project or a project involving a few friends which otherwise qualifies for a lower tier license based on revenue, or hunting down even their free users to upgrade because someone made a check in to their open source project using a Plus or Pro license. If this was happening we would have heard of it.

    I'm sure this part of the EULA is only being used against companies which have revenue requiring a higher tier license, but are trying to get away with most of their devs on free licenses. IANAL
     
  4. Kiwasi

    Kiwasi

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    I believe there is a provision to let users "downgrade" for specific projects.

     
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  5. TheOlko

    TheOlko

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    Oct 18, 2015
    Posts:
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    Thanks all for your awnsers.
    This seems to be the intention and also makes sense, but the actual license terms are just very vague. Currently this is all just hypothetical as I am using personal edition only. But I'm somewhat unwilling to put time and possibly money into projects that I might have to abandon later due to legal problems.
    I thought this too but the EULA states:
    Of cource "at the same time" can be interpreted in different ways. I would say this does not allow to own different accounts with different tiers simultaneously.
    This special rule however only seems to apply when working for "customers" or "clients" which is quite different from working toghether in a project.

    I guess at the end legal problems will be unlikely, but a less vague EULA would still be nice.