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Tower defense map design

Discussion in 'Game Design' started by PetrMAxa, Nov 14, 2017.

  1. PetrMAxa

    PetrMAxa

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2015
    Posts:
    12
    Hey guys,
    i was wondering what is the best approach for designing tower defense maps.
    You have to take in count all different creeps (speed, hp etc.) and towers (range, dmgs etc.) and levels can't be too hard or too easy.
    How do you tackle problem like that? Wihout hundreds hours of testing. o_Oo_Oo_O
     
  2. TonyLi

    TonyLi

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    Posts:
    7,165
    I can suggest two approaches.

    The first is to use Joris Dormans' Machinations framework. It's a way to sort of mathematically model gameplay, and it's perfectly designed for balance questions like yours.

    The second is less rigorous but still has some method to it. Decide on a concept for the action in the level, such as "siege". Then split it into beats, such as "scouting", "pressure", and "final assault". Divide the map into those beats. In the scouting beat, give the player a little time to build defenses, then send an initial scouting party. In the pressure beat, send gradually-increasing number of creeps in pulses. In the final assault beat, wait a little (the calm before the storm), then send a final challenge that should be defeatable if the player has built wisely up to this point. This divide-and-conquer approach lets you break down the level's action into smaller pieces that you can polish semi-independently.