Search Unity

  1. Good news ✨ We have more Unite Now videos available for you to watch on-demand! Come check them out and ask our experts any questions!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Ever participated in one our Game Jams? Want pointers on your project? Our Evangelists will be available on Friday to give feedback. Come share your games with us!
    Dismiss Notice

Should I go back to linux mint?

Discussion in 'Linux Editor' started by A_Savvidis, Nov 2, 2019.

  1. A_Savvidis

    A_Savvidis

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2016
    Posts:
    74
    I got an old laptop that I'm trying to revive. I was an old timer linux from around 2012-2016 (mint mostly)
    I'm thinking of going dual boot on my laptop. Will the lastest linux mint be ok for Unity? Will it load faster that a fresh installed windows 10?

    Currenty that the laptop is in a mass due to multiple users it takes around 5 minutes to load an empty project!
    It used to be fast with Unity versions 5.x though.

    So to make it short...
    What's your take on Unity speed (project open and android build)???
    What's your take on mint vs other distro for Unity dev?

    Thank you for your time fello devs!
     
  2. Deozaan

    Deozaan

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2010
    Posts:
    660
    Unity is getting slower over the years.

    I recently created a new project in 2018.4 on Windows 10 and it took a few minutes just to finish opening the editor and importing all the default packages.

    But once the project was ready to go, with all the appropriate library files created already, it opens fairly quickly now.

    If you're going to install Linux then Mint is a good choice, in my opinion.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2019
  3. konsic

    konsic

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2015
    Posts:
    995
    It's slower than ever. My HDRP project took ~7 minutes to load.
    But that depends on how good your CPU is.

    SRP projects take longer than built-in default projects.
     
  4. DominoM

    DominoM

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2016
    Posts:
    460
    I'd seriously consider Ubuntu Studio too. I'm thinking of switching back to it after a few years on Solus.

    Ubuntu Studio is tweaked for low latency audio production and designed as a creative studio, so it hits a lot of game dev requirements out of the box.
     
    APSchmidt likes this.
  5. Flavelius

    Flavelius

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2012
    Posts:
    719
    I have unity running on a mint laptop too. It feels like compile times are noticeably slower than on my plain ubuntu machine though (i suspected that it may be due to the compiler selection script not recognizing mint as a supported ubuntu-derivative for using roslyn, but that's really just speculation).
    What i noticed on mint is that cinnamon exhibits some stuttering when mutlitasking if one of the apps wants to display realtime video.
    Using Ubuntu with kde plasma desktop it's a lot better for me, gnome was even more stutter free (although heavier othwise).
    But this is a personal opinion, what i gathered from the interwebs is that it seems to heavily depend on specific setups and configuration. Plain Ubuntu with kde plasma was what worked for me without using arcane magic.
     
  6. Tautvydas-Zilys

    Tautvydas-Zilys

    Unity Technologies

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2013
    Posts:
    7,289
    Keep in mind we officially only support Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04 and CentOS 7. All other linux distros/versions are unsupported, and you might run into unexpected issues when using them.
     
    APSchmidt likes this.
  7. DominoM

    DominoM

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2016
    Posts:
    460
    Just an observation but I can't help but think this support policy misses the fact that a lot of Linux culture is built around choice.

    I rarely report bugs because dual booting into a supported Linux to test and report takes too much time.

    Does the Ubuntu support include variants like Ubuntu Studio? I might as well scrap my plans to switch to it if it won't address the dual boot issue.

    Do the support limitations extend to builds or just the editor?

    Are plans to support other Linux versions on the timeline at all?

    I'd really like to go all in on Unity dev, but for Linux only users, you don't make it an easy choice.
     
  8. andrews_unity

    andrews_unity

    Unity Technologies

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2015
    Posts:
    150
    To comment on this we do not support Ubuntu Studio, official support as mentioned above is limited to Ubuntu LTS 16.04/18.04 and Centos 7.

    As for plans to support newer version of these distro's or any new distro's themselves, we don't have any plans to do this that at this time.
     
  9. Tautvydas-Zilys

    Tautvydas-Zilys

    Unity Technologies

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2013
    Posts:
    7,289
    It is unfortunately not feasible for us to test Unity on more than a few Linux distributions, given the market share. Even on Windows or Mac, we don't have to test on more than 2 OS versions generally, as both OS vendors try to maintain backwards compatible (which cannot be said about Linux - for instance, Unity broke on Ubuntu 19.04 badly since they removed a system library).

    And we cannot claim support unless we know it works.
     
  10. DominoM

    DominoM

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2016
    Posts:
    460
    I switched to Solus because I got tired of things breaking with Ubuntu, so I'm not surprised by that. Maybe there's a middle ground where rather than a version of Linux, the supported platform was the libraries you build against? Maybe have a "Platform Test" package to check things out?

    The latest market share figures I've seen had over 20% of programmers using Linux, but only 7% for game development. Ubuntu is at about 40% of the distro share. So you are targeting a 3% base, when you could be trying to tempt the 20% to try game dev with Unity imho.

    I fully get that the support may be an issue, I'll leave it to you to decide whether drawing a line under the libraries rather than the distro would make things more manageable. Not being able to support 60% of the potential Linux user base is a rather large problem to have for both of us.
     
  11. A_Savvidis

    A_Savvidis

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2016
    Posts:
    74
    Market share? Linux Mint always had a larger market share than Ubuntu (check distrowatch.org and see) and besides:
    1. Even it's latest version is based on Ubuntu 18.04LTS)
    2. I tried it and Unity works like a charm!!!

    Seriously now? How did CentOS 7 end up in the supported list?
    I would accept mint, openSuse, gentoo (for the hardcore linuxians!), debian, arch... those make sense (especially mint and openSuse but I'm getting out of my own topic so to make it right...


    Linux mint vs Windows 10 on the same laptop is beyond believe! I'm talking about 5:1 time in opening a project!!! I'm presenting a speech/workshop tomorrow to 50 people about Unity thanks to linux mint (and Unity of course)!!! Thank you Unity community for improving linux support!!! Weheeeeeee
     
  12. DominoM

    DominoM

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2016
    Posts:
    460
    My guess is their commercial view of Linux is stuck a decade or so ago and thought they had to support a deb and a rpm system. Then they used their own install manager and made it a moot point.
     
  13. andrews_unity

    andrews_unity

    Unity Technologies

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2015
    Posts:
    150
    The reason for Centos support is that it currently is the industry standard for the Film industry which is why we support it. Linux has always been a cat and mouse game on the support side of things not just in the game industry but also in hardware etc... I can recall a time when working for Netgear where we only supported a very specific version of Redhat and outside that we would not provide you any support.

    The main reason for this is testing and resources, linux has such a wide area of coverage compared to windows and mac, each distro does their own special thing, updates things in their own special way and thats hard to keep up with when it comes to verification of what works and what doesn't. So we looked at what some of the verticals need such as Film and we make sure it works there and then we looked at what was the most generally supported versions of linux and that was Ubuntu LTS releases at the time. This doesn't mean that it won't work on other distro but these are the distros we ensure they work on and support.

    It had nothing to do with installer choice, or deb vs rpm or anything like that it was just a matter of what made sense at the time and the resources needed to support it. We are linux advocates as well and we are constantly looking at what makes sense for the platform. So when new distros are making the rounds and such we aren't blind to that but we also have to do what makes sense.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2019
  14. APSchmidt

    APSchmidt

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2016
    Posts:
    3,496
    What about Ubuntu Studio?

    https://ubuntustudio.org/
     
  15. andrews_unity

    andrews_unity

    Unity Technologies

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2015
    Posts:
    150
    @APSchmidt from what I can tell Ubuntu Studio is just normal Ubuntu with just some extra stuff added to it. So I mean if you install it and its just standard Ubuntu 18.04 with some extra applications installed it should be fine but we do not test or verify that it works on the Ubuntu Studio download specifically.
     
    APSchmidt likes this.
  16. Ermiq

    Ermiq

    Joined:
    May 1, 2018
    Posts:
    11
    As an answer to the opening post I've made some tests to measure how long it takes to load a project in Windows 8.1 (fresh re-install yesterday) and Ubuntu 19.10 (fresh install 3 days ago).
    Although Windows 8.1 is not Windows 10 but they are not very different actually, I've been working in Windows 10 for a year and then I've installed 8.1 and don't feel any difference (except the fresh air and freedom from forcibly installed updates, useless bloat processes, 25% CPU load and 50% RAM load in idle state on Windows 10, haha).
    Same for Ubuntu and Mint. Mint is pretty much the same thing as Ubuntu except some additional preinstalled apps and a tiny difference in desktop environments performance.

    So, first of all I've preloaded the same project in both systems to emulate an everyday basis workflow, then made the measurings on fresh system load, Unity Hub load and then the project load (it's a testing grounds project with like 50+ scripts and 10 objects on the scene). So, the results are:

    Ubuntu:
    - system load to the desktop - 35 sec.
    - Unity Hub load - 6 sec.
    - Project load - 3 min 25 sec.

    Windows:
    - system load to desktop - 28 sec.
    - Unity Hub load - 42 sec.
    - Project load - 2 min 29 sec.

    The rig: laptop with i7-7700HQ, HDD 7200rpm, 16 GB RAM.
    Unity version is 2019.2.15f1 on both platforms.

    Yeah, it's just one iteration, so it's not a reliable statistics at all, but that's how it actually goes in my experience. Some thing are faster on Windows, others are faster on Linux, but an overall experience is quite the same on both OS's.
     
    A_Savvidis likes this.
  17. APSchmidt

    APSchmidt

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2016
    Posts:
    3,496
    So it seemed to me; I asked in case.

    Now I consider switching to CentOS. I don't remember people using Unity under CentOS complaining here... :p
     
  18. ChanceEncounter

    ChanceEncounter

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2014
    Posts:
    10
    Please, PLEASE reconsider this. Ubuntu is rapidly approaching vendor-lock status, keyed to utilities with which many users are uncomfortable. I realize that supporting multiple distros is a nightmare almost akin to supporting another OS, but Mint is Ubuntu-based, and should be relatively easy to support, but it's taken several steps toward user freedom where Ubuntu is stepping away.

    I realize that distro is a user preference thing, and I'm not here to evangelize, but the bottom line is that I've resolved never to give Canonical money if I can help it, but I'm still stuck with Ubuntu. I'm stuck with Ubuntu because it's the Debalike with vendor support, and it's the one with vendor support because it's popular. It's the same cycle I'm trying to escape in moving to Unity on Linux.

    And I've no particular affinity for Mint or any other Debalike, but Mint is the one that's built on Ubuntu without being Canonical, so please, please re-evaluate the difficulty in supporting it officially. Mint, or Debian proper. Doesn't matter, just please give us a choice that isn't sorry-Ubuntu-has-all-the-market-share-so-use-it.
     
    A_Savvidis and DominoM like this.
  19. APSchmidt

    APSchmidt

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2016
    Posts:
    3,496
    CentOS offers two versions of their distribution, which is best to use Unity with?

    https://centos.org/
     
  20. andrews_unity

    andrews_unity

    Unity Technologies

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2015
    Posts:
    150
    At this moment Centos 7.x is the supported version so any one of those should work.
     
    APSchmidt likes this.
  21. andrews_unity

    andrews_unity

    Unity Technologies

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2015
    Posts:
    150
    So as I mentioned above we are Linux users as well and we keep watch of distros that come and go and I understand your concerns about wanting a choice and having options etc... The issue here is just a matter of support and resources where it makes sense. We can't support all the distros clearly and sadly to say Ubuntu is where the market share is at the moment.

    The main concern around the Ubuntu derivatives is they often are different enough that it makes supporting them difficult for example in the case of Mint which window manager do we support ? They provide 3 different options for you? Cinnamon, MATE, XFCE, while sure some of them are Gnome enough but they all have their own way of doing things and we could not possible ensure that they all worked, these are LTS based releases as well, and the list goes on and on and on. While I share your concerns with regards to having a choice and wanting to make sure we give users options when it comes to which distros they can use. We have to make sure we give it some real thought and ensure that we are committing the resources in the appropriate place.

    With that said you can run the product on any distro at your own risk of course (I run it on arch at the moment at home for example, and have seen arch specific bugs) but you will not get support and if there are bugs specific to that distro its very unlikely (though not impossible) that they will get resolved unless verified that its also broken on the supported distros.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2019
  22. APSchmidt

    APSchmidt

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2016
    Posts:
    3,496
    Thank you. How will I know when you support Unity for CentOS 8?
     
  23. andrews_unity

    andrews_unity

    Unity Technologies

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2015
    Posts:
    150
    we will announce it and we will update the system requirements page with supported versions when changes happen.
     
    APSchmidt likes this.
  24. APSchmidt

    APSchmidt

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2016
    Posts:
    3,496
    Thank you! :)

    Any advice for the new user I am about using CentOs for Unity?
     
  25. ChanceEncounter

    ChanceEncounter

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2014
    Posts:
    10
    I get that. I absolutely get that. I don't think I made my problem clear: Canonical is doing a number of things that make me more than just uncomfortable. They're Microsofting the Linuxsphere. Most of the software I use is not supported on CentOS.

    Allow me to rephrase: I am a Unity developer. I want to use Linux for work. I am horrified by Canonical, but Unity Technologies has decided what distro I am going to use. That's not hyperbole, I'm a Unity dev, if I want to use Linux for work, I have to use a distro you support.

    *Just* the nonsense surrounding Snappy should be enough to illustrate why being forced to use Ubuntu is unacceptable. When I say literally any other Debalike, I mean it. I don't care what distro it is, I just don't want to be held captive by a company that's trying its hardest to find ways to corner the Linux market, commercialize its nuts off, proliferate a "convenient" package manager that's essentially a FOSS backdoor... I just want *Linux*.

    Which, I suppose, brings me back to my original suggestion: just support Debian-GNOME, if you want to KISS, and tell people to run *Ubuntu* at their own risk.

    I want to leave Canonical for exactly the same reasons I want to leave Microsoft, and, no kidding, you guys are the ones who won't let me leave them.
     
    DominoM likes this.
  26. olundqvist89

    olundqvist89

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2020
    Posts:
    1
    Im just about to start dipping my toes in Unity. Im running it on Arch with XFCE. Seeing as your also runing it on the same distro, is there a window manager that works better then others? Based on what I read in this thread it would make sense if Gnome was the least buggy.
     
  27. A_Savvidis

    A_Savvidis

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2016
    Posts:
    74
    That's weird. In my case Linux mint project lead was around 2 minutes where Windows 10 project load more than 5!!!
    I doing new tests right now because that's the laptop I'll get with me on the upcoming game jam
     
  28. Ermiq

    Ermiq

    Joined:
    May 1, 2018
    Posts:
    11
    Probably anti malware software is running in the background. Update service and Superfetch are also known as the main reasons of Windows 10 slowness, that's why I always kill them as soon and often as possible.
     
  29. LevonRavel

    LevonRavel

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2014
    Posts:
    167
    And this is the reason why lots of Companies refuse to release for Linux Distros there are 200+ choices out there and no one wants to choose only one to use. This would be ridiculous to dev against you would need 200 systems to make sure everyone's applications played nicely, I am just grateful they released it for any distro at all...
     
    Ermiq likes this.
unityunity