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RTX 2070 bake performance.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Keppiih, Aug 26, 2019.

  1. Keppiih

    Keppiih

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    using Progressive GPU(preview) light baking, Im getting ~500mrays/sec, and With msi afterburner auto oc, 620mrays/sec, is my gpu working properly?
     
  2. GameDevCouple_I

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    Probably. Without seeing what you are trying to bake, its pretty difficult to determine.

    Some screenshots and more context are a minimum for decent replies in this case.
     
  3. eastes

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    Yes. You're over 20 times faster than my CPU and it's a beast. Wish I could use GPU.
     
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  4. AndersMalmgren

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    Unity really needs to come up with a way for using GPU for scenes bigger than small sample scenes. Otherwise its just good for archviz and similar
     
  5. iamthwee

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    I'm thinking about getting a 2080 Super, the rig just coming in shy of 2K. Still, remember GPU is only good for smallish scenes.
     
  6. Ryiah

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    The RTX 2080 SUPER increases performance by 4 to 9% over the RTX 2080. Just throwing that out there in case RTX 2080 prices vary quite a bit in your area compared to RTX 2080 SUPER prices. In my area the price difference is up to $100.


    By the way there have been some leaks lately indicating that a new line of cards is coming with both a die shrink and a new architecture and that they should be due sometime Q3/Q4 2020. Just mentioning this because the GTX 10 series had a similar die shrink and architecture change situation and they ended up being insanely good value.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2019
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  7. AndersMalmgren

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    My 1080 TI is stone age and needs replacement I really hope next series from nvidia offers more sane prices
     
  8. hippocoder

    hippocoder

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    I gently suggest the cost-effective 2070 Super for those upgrading from 1080 and below, particularly if raytracing is a thing you'd like to try out.

    Otherwise it offers nothing over 1080 TI.

    The 2080 and 2080 S are overpriced in my view, for the performance.
     
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  9. iamthwee

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    Hi that's a valid point however, I'm hoping to build a rig that's gonna last at least 5-10years (I know, Ryiah is going to go mad because no PC lasts 10 years etc) but when you're putting down 2K an extra hundred quid doesn't seem too much.
     
  10. iamthwee

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    This is the rig what do you think

    Case FRACTAL DESIGN NODE 304 Mini ITX CaseProcessor (CPU)AMD Ryzen 7 3800X Eight Core CPU (3.9GHz-4.5GHz/36MB CACHE/AM4)Get 3 Months of XBOX Game Pass for PC w/ select AMD Ryzen CPUsThe Outer Worlds -AND- Borderlands 3 w/ select AMD Ryzen CPUsMotherboardASUS® ROG STRIX X470-I GAMING (DDR4, USB 3.1, 6Gb/s)Memory (RAM)32GB Corsair VENGEANCE DDR4 2400MHz (2 x 16GB)Graphics Card8GB NVIDIA GEFORCE RTX 2070 SUPER - HDMI, 3x DP GeForce - RTX VR Ready!Get Call of Duty: Modern Warfare with select NVIDIA GeForce RTX GPUs!1st Storage Drive1TB SEAGATE BARRACUDA 2.5" SSD, (upto 560MB/sR | 540MB/sW)DVD/BLU-RAY DriveNOT REQUIREDPower SupplyCORSAIR 650W TXm SERIES™ SEMI-MODULAR 80 PLUS® GOLD, ULTRA QUIETPower Cable1 x 1 Metre UK Power Cable (Kettle Lead)Processor CoolingNoctua NH-L9i Low Profile AM4, Super Quiet CPU CoolerThermal PasteSTANDARD THERMAL PASTE FOR SUFFICIENT COOLINGSound CardONBOARD 6 CHANNEL (5.1) HIGH DEF AUDIO (AS STANDARD)Wireless/Wired NetworkingGIGABIT LAN PORT + Wi-Fi (Wi-Fi excluded on H310I-PLUS)USB/Thunderbolt OptionsMIN. 2 x USB 3.0 & 4 x USB 2.0 PORTS @ BACK PANEL + MIN. 2 FRONT PORTSOperating SystemGenuine Windows 10 Home 64 Bit - inc. Single Licence [KUK-00001]Operating System LanguageUnited Kingdom - English LanguageWindows Recovery MediaWindows 10 Multi-Language Recovery Image - Unlimited Downloads from Online AccountOffice SoftwareFREE 30 Day Trial of Microsoft® Office® 365 (Operating System Required)Anti-VirusBullGuard™ Internet Security - Free 90 Day License inc. Gamer ModeBrowserMicrosoft® Edge (Windows 10 Only)Warranty3 Year Standard Warranty (1 Month Collect & Return, 1 Year Parts, 3 Year Labour)DeliverySTANDARD INSURED DELIVERY TO UK MAINLAND (MON-FRI)Build TimeStandard Build - Approximately 12 to 14 working days
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2019
  11. hippocoder

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    I'm not going to read that :p

    But obviously, yeah if you can get anything, get it.
     
  12. iamthwee

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    @Ryiah do you suggest water cooling or fans, I read somewhere that if the water cooling fails the replacement is way more costly that is why you should go with fans.
     
  13. AndersMalmgren

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    Stock watercooling is not better than air cooled. Custom loop is the only way to fly
     
  14. Antypodish

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    @iamthwee I am not sure how differ GPU form CPU liquid cooling, but I run my liquid cooled i7 CPU 5 years now, day to day, and still works.
     
  15. iamthwee

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    Yeah, I'm leaning towards a Noctua Fan.

    Essentially, I want to test stuff like my stuff in the blender thread.


    https://forum.unity.com/threads/blender-2-8-released.719690/


    Now I could probably get away with an old 1080 series card with eevee but I'm dying to try out ray tracing. So if I'm building a PC I might as well go all out?
     
  16. iamthwee

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    I dunno, I thought the GPU cards cool themselves with the fan. I just hear bad things with water cooling.

    Like it depends on the software to monitor if it is working or not. So if it fails and your software fails you wouldn't even know it had failed, whereas with a fan you can literally hear it stop whirring.

    Plus the biggest downside is water cooling is going to be way more expensive to replace if it dies. That was my biggest concern.
     
  17. iamthwee

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    BTW has anyone tried out the 24GB nvidia Titan RTX and is it worth considering?
     
  18. Antypodish

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    You can hear water cooling pump. So is not that is silent hunter. So if dies, you will know it.
    Also, GPU and CPU have inbuilt thermo protection. So they will just shut down, before cooking up.
    Liquid cooling probably will be more loud by hinge, than fan when idle. But will be much quieter, than fan on busy GPU, or CPU.
     
  19. Ryiah

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    Be aware that X470 motherboards are not guaranteed to support Ryzen 3000 chips out of the box. You will need to update the BIOS and if the motherboard doesn't have a BIOS flashback system (basically it's a USB port with a button nearby) built into it you will need an older generation processor to update the BIOS. I don't believe this motherboard supports flashback.

    AMD is different from Intel when it comes to choosing memory. Ryzen greatly benefits from faster memory. Unless you need server memory kits (which will almost always be around 2400 due to ECC) you should be buying DDR4-3200.

    Water only truly serves one purpose. It's very beautiful to look at if you know how to set up everything correctly. Quality air coolers from a company like Noctua are roughly on par with pre-filled closed loop water coolers. Additionally a water cooler has to have the liquid replaced on a regular basis (every six to twelve months).
     
  20. Antypodish

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    That weird. Maybe true for some. But I run 5 years quite extensively, with 0 change. I think it is just marketing?
    Or we talking about different liquid cooling systems?
     
  21. Ryiah

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    I'm referring to custom loop water cooling where you have to assemble everything yourself. A pre-filled closed loop cooler is a different story but I wouldn't trust them to last five years.
     
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  22. iamthwee

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    I'm getting it from https://www.pcspecialist.co.uk

    where they build it for me

     
  23. iamthwee

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    Yeah TBH, I wanna hide it in a custom built cabinet that I'm going to make myself from B&Q with some MDF. I hate having an unsightly tower on display, that's why I was seriously considering getting a NUC Hades canyon but since decided against it after hearing your opinions.
     
  24. iamthwee

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  25. iamthwee

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    One more question, is it worth saving £100 to go with windows 8.1 which I have a legal copy of instead of windows 10?

    Or do I absolutely need windows 10, for the latest games etc.
     
  26. Ryiah

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    My Windows 10 licenses come from the following website and they've all activated properly with Microsoft.

    https://www.urcdkey.com/microsoft-windows-10-pro-retail-cd-key-global_1976-20.html

    Windows 10 is absolutely required for DirectX 12 and DirectX Raytracing. I don't know of too many games that strictly require it but we're getting to that point, and Windows 10 isn't as bad these days as it used to be. Windows 10 Pro can be configured to not update constantly.
     
  27. iamthwee

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    Wow that is well cheap, they're charging £120 for windows Pro on my website, but I suppose it is fully tested and all the software is properly installed.

    I'm not sure if I trust myself to do that for the sake of saving £70 or something lol, I'm a mac user.
     
  28. iamthwee

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    What's the diff between windows pro and windows home anyway?

    I'm not on a domain or group network or anything it is just from home use.
     
  29. iamthwee

    iamthwee

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    WTH you can activate 3-5 computers with one key, is that actually legit?
     
  30. Ryiah

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    Features. For me the most important feature is the ability to fully configure Windows Update.

    https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/compare-windows-10-home-vs-pro

    Windows retail keys are intended to be transferred from one computer to the next as you upgrade the hardware.
     
  31. iamthwee

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  32. Ryiah

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    By "configure" I mean "delay". Windows Home forces an update after 30 days. Windows Pro can be offset to 365 days. With Pro I have it offset long enough for them to have fixed any stupid mistakes that snuck through. It's more paranoia on my part than anything.
     
  33. iamthwee

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    Ah I see, so updates are inevitable.
    Do I need an antivirus or something? On mac I don't have anything and I've been safe for years.
     
  34. Ryiah

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    There are ways to completely stop them but I don't recommend it. Just waiting a few months after the initial update release is good enough to avoid any actual problems with the update.

    Windows 10 has an antivirus system builtin and if you're anything like me and avoid questionable websites and downloads and keep an adblocker running you shouldn't have any problems.
     
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  35. iamthwee

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    OK thanks I think that has answered most my questions.
     
  36. mgear

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  37. Antypodish

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    Thx. There are some potentially good points. Some purely hypothetical.
    However my 5y old liquid cooling choice speaks for itself :) Of course, is not guaranteed to be same for anyone else.
     
  38. Ryiah

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    According to Gamers Nexus the average lifespan of an all-in-one (aka closed loop cooler) liquid cooler is between 4 and 6 years which means your cooler is right at the edge of its average lifespan. At the very least I would check it for leaks every few months.

    https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/2926-how-liquid-coolers-work-deep-dive

    For the record my cooler is the Noctua NH-U12S SE. It's fan has an MTTF (Mean Time to Failure) of up to 150,000 hours or approximately 15 to 17 years.

    https://www.amazon.com/Noctua-NH-U12S-SE-AM4-Premium-Grade-Cooler/dp/B01N9X2YYN
    https://noctua.at/en/nh-u12s-se-am4

    If you intend to replace your computer every four to five years the AIO/CLC is perfectly fine but if you intend to use the computer beyond that (I frequently give my computer away to family members or friends after four years) the cooling system will need to be replaced on average at least once.
     
  39. Antypodish

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    Yep, I was targeting 4 years. So I am on +1 year bonus ;)
    If it leaves 5-6 years its fine. I simply now run it down, with storage drives and maybe tower to salvage really. Rest is already kind of ancient. I won't be bother replacing individual parts, as all parts are about that life span anyway.
    I already replaced HDD long time ago for SSD. GPU is not at best either. So sings of age are getting there.
    Btw is dry. For now ;)
    I may not be lucky with next purchase next time tho Is always gamble with electronics.
    Reading reviews are best I can do before buy.

    Probably anything else will fail / be replaced few times, before need to replace it :D

    However, all saying that. Not sure if I would personally go for custom liquid cooling. I have no experience in these. Probably I would consider next time, if GPU of choice would make much noise with fans. Otherwise, not sure if is worth effort.
    I think is the same as on vid from few post above, which was prized for its valors.
    Sure, I wouldn't mind, to have it.
     
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  40. ShilohGames

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    If you really want to build a tiny ITX case, you may struggle to get a really good custom water loop to fit. I mentioned this because I noticed you listed an ITX case above.

    If you want something that is relatively maintenance free, a nice air cooling solution is probably your best bet. For an air cooled build, check out the Noctua heatsink and fan combos.

    If you want the best performance possible and you are willing to spend more money, consider building a custom water loop. For example, one of my computers uses a Lian Li PC-O11DX case with a custom water loop that uses two 360mm radiators to cool an RTX 2080ti and an i9-9900K.

    One advantage of using a custom water loop is that you keep it relatively quiet under full load. In my water cooled system, I have six Noctua radiator fans spinning slightly above the minimum fan speed all the time regardless of load. With a purely air cooled build, I would need to ramp up the fan speed any time the load increases. With a purely air cooled high end gaming PC, it can sound like you are reving up a vacuum cleaner.

    ShilohGamesPC1.JPG
    ShilohGamesPC2.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2019
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  41. Antypodish

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    What you got missing, is fish :)
    Nice setup.
     
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  42. iamthwee

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    Yeah I wanted to build an ITX case originally to get it as small as possible, but you can't when you go for a monster RTX card which is my driving motivation. On that website I listed 'pcspecialists' it forces to get a bigger case depending on the card you choose. My idea was to build a custom cabinet that I can just hide it away / behind.

    I really don't mind the fan, I suppose you could wear 'headphones' and the maintenance is more important to me, so if a fan needs replacing it is something I could do easier than replace a water cooling system

    I'm not really technical at all, and I wouldn't even trust myself to buy the parts and build it myself lol.

    Nice setup, I'm really eager to try out raytracing.
     
  43. Antypodish

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    Just to say, computer base noise become quite big deal, when living with others. But not only. Some can get annoyed from little as mouse and keyboard clicks, to turbo jet sounds like, roaming through door of the room. Sometimes just appreciating sit and doing something, without needing headphones. Listening to birds, or water flow next to working PC for example (I admit, not the best excuse) :)
     
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  44. iamthwee

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    Yeah I agree, that's why my mac book is perfect as it makes no noise, but then again I'm not exactly stressing it.

    I think if you're gaming / testing raytracing it is going to be making some noise. It's interesting because in the vid I posted above the decibal noise ratings actually suggested there wasn't that much of a difference between water coolers and fans?

    me.jpg
     
  45. Ryiah

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    Getting exactly what you want almost always requires building them yourself. There are in fact ITX cases with support for large graphics cards. Just as an example here is a case that supports dual slot cards with a maximum length of 300mm.

    https://www.dan-cases.com/dana4.php

    Here is an RTX 2080 Ti that would fit in it.

    https://www.newegg.com/evga-geforce-rtx-2080-ti-11g-p4-2281-kr/p/N82E16814487418

    That said in my opinion it's harder to build a silent system with ITX than it is with a larger case. With ITX components are right up against the vent holes on the case whereas with larger cases the air has to flow around at an angle which helps deaden noise coming out. That and you can fit larger coolers in general. Three slot GPU, large CPU cooler, etc.
     
  46. Antypodish

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    I just quickly checked few vids with recorded sounds of Nvidia 1080 and 2080. They are pretty quiet on load, I need to say :)
     
  47. iamthwee

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    Yh if I can built a cabinet that feels like it is part of the wall, I won't be too fussed on size. Plus I like messing around with carpentry and shelf units etc.
     
  48. Antypodish

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    @iamthwee why not put inside the bed? :)
     
  49. ShilohGames

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    The video you linked was comparing typical AIO (all in one) water coolers with purely air coolers. AIO coolers are easy to install, but they are weak joke compared to a high end custom water cooling loop. A high end custom water cooling loop can easily cost $400-1000, while most AIO water coolers are around $100.

    Performance wise, a high end purely air cooler (like a Noctua heatsink and fan combo) will often match or even exceed that of a typical AIO water cooler. Similarly for noise, a good Noctua heatsink and fan combo will often generate less noise than a typical AIO water cooler.

    A custom high end water cooling loop will easily beat any AIO water cooler and any purely air heatsink and fan combo. Just remember when people say "water cooler", there is a giant difference between a typical AIO style water cooler and a very high end custom open loop water cooler style solution.

    Having said all of that, I don't use a high end custom water cooling loop in every computer I own. I use it in my gaming rig (i9-9900K & RTX 2080ti) that I posted pics of in this thread, and I love it in that system. But I use a Noctua heatsink and fan combo in my primary workstation. My main workstation is an AMD 3900X (air cooled) with a RX 2080ti FE (stock air cooled). I don't play games on my workstation, so I don't care about fan noise under long sustained loads the same way I do on my gaming rig.
     
  50. iamthwee

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    ^
    I see, I feel that's a lot of money to drop but then I suppose if you're going all out. On the website I'm looking at it has these options. I don't know the difference between custom and AIO coolers. Is any of these a custom loop cooler?

    Screenshot 2019-10-19 at 18.09.44.png