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Perpetual license going to be ceased in March 2017?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by newlife, Jan 11, 2016.

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  1. mdrotar

    mdrotar

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    They continued bug fixes for 4.6 long after 5.0 came out. Are they really just going to dump 5.X as soon as 6.0 comes out and force you to upgrade for bug fixes? To a subscription service? I don't see this working out well.
     
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  2. angrypenguin

    angrypenguin

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    Like you say, that's not what they did for 4.x. I'm pretty sure the actual support ran longer than the support guarantee. It doesn't mean they will drop support, it just means they're no longer obligated to provide it.
     
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  3. movra

    movra

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    Where do you read anything about guarantee? The actual wording on the perpetual license page is pretty definite. You say they won't necessarily stop support, but that's exactly what it says.

    "Support of Unity Pro perpetual licenses with new features, improvements, fixes and services will stop in March, 2017"
     
    kittik likes this.
  4. Martin_H

    Martin_H

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    I wonder if "services" will also mean the login verification service. AFAIK Adobe did shutdown their verification servers for old creative suite versions, which was the reason why they provided access to CS2 volume license installers that did not need the verification. Those led to the "CS2 now free" rumors as far as I remember.
     
  5. Prodigga

    Prodigga

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    If Unity is going to be changing the way they license their software (with the removal of perpetual licenses) I really think they should take the opportunity to reconsider the pricing structure of their monthly subscription. The current system is all-or-nothing, and the price is inflated to such a high number because of all the 'extras' that Unity tacks on top of the pro license (whether you want to make use of the extras or not.)

    I think a lot of people here are like me - I am a solo indie developer and I develop on both iOS and Android. A pro license to cover all these platforms costs $225 USD a month. ($325 Australian dollars per month - That is almost half of my portion of the rent at my old house)

    What do I really get our of Unity Pro for $225 a month?
    Let's take a look at all the features listed on this page here and lets see which ones are relevant to me and other indies like me.
    1. Customizable Splash Screen - Yes! This is the main reason to upgrade to pro. No 'personal' splash screen. I am happy to pay for this!
    2. Cloud build for 12 months - solo developer, don't see a need. Test flight and Google Play Alpha/Beta services are fine for me when it comes to testing. For me this is useless. I wouldn't spend money on this.
    3. Unity Analytics Pro - provides analytics, and in the future it'll also let me perform in app purchases natively. I can do both of these things for free with plugins (Google analytics (For Analytics) and OpenIAB (For IAP)) as an example. For this reason I wouldn't spend money on this.
    4. Team License - Solo dev, for me this is useless. I wouldn't spend money on this.
    5. Prioritized bug handling - if you are developing a simple mobile game (As you might as a solo developer), you probably won't run into any bugs that are obscure enough to warrant prioritization. You'll probably find bugs that effect a lot of people, so these bugs will get resolved quickly anyway. This is a nice one to have but again, I wouldn't spend money on this.
    6. Game Performance Reporting - You can download crash logs from both google play and itunes connect. The crash logs provide you with a fair bit of insight. It'd be nice to have a service like this that aggregates all that information and makes it easier to understand, but that is a luxury. I wouldn't spend money on this.
    7. Beta access - Luxury item. I'd download it and check out the newest and coolest features, but I wouldn't develop in it. I wouldn't spend money on this.
    8. Unlimited Revenue and Funding - if you earn enough money from a free license, this is not really an issue. Just buy the pro license.
    9. Future platforms included - This one does not make sense. Let's say I am a pro user and some time in the future Unity rolls out support for a fancy new mobile operating system and they charge $75 a month for it, just as they do with iOS and Android. Do I get it for free? I wouldn't think so, since I need separate licenses for Android/iOS. So.. Uh.. Yeah, lets skip this one since it doesn't really make much sense.
    10. Professional editor skin - Luxury item. I do like the pro skin but I can live without it and it does not effect the end product in any way. I wouldn't spend money on this.
    11. Asset Store Level 11 - Lots of free assets and discounted assets. We have this at work where we use Unity Pro and it is actually fairly nice. I would spend money on this.
    12. Professional Community Features - This is not even a thing yet - seriously, it says 'coming soon' if you hover over it. Supposedly it gives you access to a 'pro' section of the forums. Whether these sections will be visible to us peasants is unclear (Maybe we can view but we can't post.) Unless these pro sections receive special attention from the Unity Developers, it isn't going to be any more valuable than the forum currently is. Either way, lets ignore this one because it is still 'coming soon!'.
    There is two things in that entire feature list that interest me. Two. The rest are either useless, redundant, or doesn't make sense for a solo developer.

    I end up spending $225 to remove a splash screen and gain access to Lv11.

    I am not suggesting that all those features collectively are worth less than $225. But unless you are a big developer working on something big, a developer who wants all the latest bells and whistles on their new project, a lot of these features are frivolous.

    Let us pick what we want to pay for. If I want all 12 of those features, it could cost me $225 a month, thats fine. But don't make me pay $225 to simply remove a splash screen and thrown in all these 'extras' to make it seem like it is 'worth it'.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016
  6. bluescrn

    bluescrn

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    The other issue for mobile developers is that we don't have access to the same feature set. There's no way that deferred shading, PBR, and real-time GI are going to be used in a real-world mobile game (well, unless it's really just a tech demo for the latest+greatest device). Even the most basic of postprocessing effects still need using with care on mobile.

    In particular, the switch to Enlighten has been all pain and no gain for mobile devs. IMHO, 4.x is still the better version for mobile projects if you need baked lighting.
     
  7. Martin_H

    Martin_H

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    I'm guessing that paying for stuff you don't need on a pro license is what makes it viable to offer the personal edition for free. Maybe a 3rd income tier at 250k+/year with an increased price point and a slightly lowered price for the 100k income licenses would be a solution?
     
  8. jcarpay

    jcarpay

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    Spot on!
     
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  9. Prodigga

    Prodigga

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    Sure, but to be fair Enlighten does not effect the price of the pro license. I dont think it is the best example to use if you are trying to make the point that mobile license provide less value..!

    Let's break it down. Look at the benefits of Unity Pro Standalond (75 Freedom Bucks p/m). For this price, you get everything listed above. (12+ features)

    It feels unfair to have to pay $75 on top of that for each mobile platform when really the mobile license only gives you:

    1. The abillity to remove Unity Splash on target platform (Android/iOS)
    2. Cloud build support for target platform (Android/iOS)
    3. Unity Analytics Pro for target platform (Android/iOS)
    This is only 3 features compared to the 12+ features that you get with the standalone pro license. For the same price.

    To add insult to injury you need to purchase 2 of these mobile licenses - one for each mobile platform - bringing the total to $225 per month.

    What.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016
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  10. mdrotar

    mdrotar

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    I'd also point out that when Unity 5 was released we were promised many great things that would "come soon", probably to dissuade people from requesting a refund. But they didn't deliver. We've already missed out on 1 year (almost) out of the 2 years we'll get access to these promised features.

    Analytics Pro - Still in beta. The same service is currently free to pro and non-pro users.

    Game Performance Reporting - After almost a year of being released, and this is still nothing more than a way to log uncaught C# exceptions to a central server. It doesn't even log native crash events yet.

    Future Platforms Included - What platforms would they release that they wouldn't offer to free users too? None so far.

    Asset Store Level 11 - I'm glad some people got some use out of some of the assets. Some were fun the play around with but I can't think of a single free one that I would actually use in a real project. They said they were going to rethink Level 11 the make it more useful but given the speed of Unity, it probably won't change until next year when Unity 6 is released, and Unity 5 Pro users won't get it anymore.

    Professional Community Features - This is still absolutely nothing... at all.
     
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  11. Kiwasi

    Kiwasi

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    Pro is not about the features. It's about the revenue cap. If you buy pro before you reach the revenue cap you are insane.
     
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  12. mdrotar

    mdrotar

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    If that were true, then the revenue cap would be the only difference between Pro and free.
     
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  13. Ostwind

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    I'm not hitting the cap but I also would not be able get all the extra contract work if the end product would have forced personal edition splash screen before customer logos and stuff. Some say royalties are bad but so are splash screens depending what type work you do. I've always covered my perpetual license costs as past of the contract work.

    But then again I might be insane because I did not ask for a refund for my U5 pre-order when it was possible and was possibly influenced by the marketing hype during pre-order and after detailed announcements of upcoming stuff which are still coming soon or beta features after a year or more :rolleyes:

    It's been a year soon from release and seems I only payed for the splash screen 3x for each platform as the Level 11 has not been that great benefit with the lottery system and madness sales being better or having the same. Cloud build has the same 12 month time limit no matter how many pro platforms you paid for. I don't remember all the marketing talk anymore but somehow I was expecting pro tier from all the services for the 2 years support I paid for or something even close it. From services the Cloud build is only finished one and the given pro tier is with limited repo size limit. There is no info about possible UNET or IAP service benefits for pro users. @mdrotar summed up some of the other stuff that was listed already at pre-order and are still not here... maybe they are finished when my perpetual license expires deprecates at 2017

    At this point I would also say to everyone that does not have real need for splash screen and not hitting the cap: best to stay away from pro version. You can easily go with the free version cause it seems you can subscribe to all services without pro anyways and even have it cheaper :(
     
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  14. darkhog

    darkhog

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    Except LV11. Seriously, that's what I've suspected since @John Riccitiello took over. You know, EA was still (relatively...) a good company when he took it over back in 2007. Unity is still a good company...
     
  15. Kiwasi

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    Unity is hoping to capitalise on insanity. It's a common marketing tactic.

    There are of course always exceptions to the grand sweeping statements I make. If I was building a complete app solution as a for a third party I would use pro as well.
     
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  16. Moonjump

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    If it is about the revenue cap, they could have one pricing for > $100K pa, but offer lower tiers for those for those who are not earning as much, but need Pro (for contract work, especially if only occasionally, or those working with publishers who do not offer an advance). Spreading the cost between more users is good, but it will only happen if it is affordable for a wider range of users. For example:

    > $100K pa = Normal price
    > $50K pa = Normal price * 0.5f
    < $50K pa = Normal price * 0.25f
     
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  17. daisySa

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    As a Unity Pro version 4 customer who preordered Unity 5, the cost was only USD 600. However, for that outlay I was expecting much more than what’s been delivered and we’re now only just over a year away from Unity 6.

    I don’t care about the dark skin or level 11, but the words “Unity Personal Edition” on the splash screen can really form a poor first impression for the player and colour their perception of the game’s quality. That’s really my only reason for staying with Pro. It’s essentially extortion if you have an issue with it - the strategy of artificially creating a problem, and then asking your target to pay up and we’ll make your troubles disappear.

    And some of the Pro benefits are so opaque: e.g. I don’t see any evidence of my bug reports being prioritised. I currently have four open cases where I’ve never even received a response (apart from the automatic reply sent when opening the case).

    In general, I really love Unity but I find many of the management decisions more than a little strange. That said, I don’t have access to their financial data - there may be solid reasons why they’re doing this.
     
  18. Ryiah

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    How is it extortion? You're not forced to upgrade to Unity Pro. There are people doing fine on Unity Personal and there are other game engines aside from Unity if you can't live with the presence of the splash screen.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2016
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  19. Kiwasi

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    You've got this backwards. Unity is offering you a free product if you abide by their terms. Hardly extortionist behaviour.

    If you don't like the terms you simply pay the full price.
     
  20. daisySa

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    Yes, as I said, that's what I did (USD 600 as an upgrader). I just don't agree it's a good management strategy.
     
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  21. angrypenguin

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    What improvement would you suggest?

    It all depends on point of view. It feels like "extortion" if you're taking the free stuff for granted and then find yourself in a position where you have to pay for Pro.

    It doesn't feel like extortion (at least not to me) if you take the thing as a whole, including the restrictions placed on the Personal license in the first place. I know up front that I only have permission to use that license until that income threshold comes along. That factors into the decision I make when I pick Unity for a project. They're not "creating a problem" or "extorting" me when they later ask for money, they're just asking me to stick to my side of an agreement I already accepted.
     
  22. daisySa

    daisySa

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    Before Unity 5, there was no “Personal Edition” label at startup; Unity created that, knowing full well that most people wouldn’t like that, and then asked for money to take it away. It’s not something that exists to make games; it’s purely there to persuade the target to hand over cash.

    Guys, I really don’t want to debate the semantics of the word “extortion” here, I really need to get back to development. Just making a passing comment, OK? :)
     
  23. Kiwasi

    Kiwasi

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    No way I want to go back to the 4.x licensing days. It was more extortional then the 5.x model. Sure for free users the splash screen didn't come with the words "personal edition". But the free version was only half the engine. The change for pro users from 4.x to 5.x was essentially nothing. The change for free users was phenomenal. It was a give away unprecedented in game engine history.

    That's left us with two general classes of complaints
    • Free/personal users who don't think this is enough, and want more for free
    • Pro users who don't feel like the cost of pro is worth it, and want pro for less money
    Fair enough. Probably a good idea to avoid discussion on the splash screen or dark skin. These threads can get hotter then C# versus UnityScript. ;)
     
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  24. angrypenguin

    angrypenguin

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    After they changed the license to give free users feature parity with pro users of course they wanted to still give a reason to pay for it. You didn't have to give them money to take it away if you were happy using the version of the engine you already had.
     
  25. Yash987654321

    Yash987654321

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    I can not even believe this post.
     
  26. bluescrn

    bluescrn

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    To be fair, Unity do put a lot of effort into supporting these difficult and rapidly evolving mobile platforms.

    Apple demanded that all apps were 64bit, only giving developers about 3 months notice before blocking new 32-bit-only apps from the store. Unity had to put a lot of engineering effort into the very complex task of getting IL2CPP working earlier than they'd planned, and in 4.x as well as 5, to support 64bit iOS builds.

    We've also had Metal support, and more recently Apple TV support.
     
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  27. Prodigga

    Prodigga

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    I am paying $225 per month is for Unity Pro Features. I don't pay $225 a month as a 'thank you' to Unity for putting in the effort to support Android and iOS. All of the mobile platform features (IL2CPP, bug fixes, etc) are available for personal edition users.

    This is the problem with the all-or-nothing approach. I am happy to pay a little something to support Unity. I'd happily drop $10 per month per platform for splash screen removed ($30 for Standalone, iOS and Android).

    • I'd feel good about helping Unity
    • I'll be getting a little something back from Unity in return in the form of splash screen removal
    • and I don't have to break the bank to support my favorite game engine.
    For all the other services, just charge the developer per-service. Analytics Pro already has a planned subscription fee of $25 for personal edition users (It is free for Pro users). This is a good start. Just make all the services a monthly subscription fee and let the users pick and choose what they like.

    This'd make everything so much more affordable and accessible. In my long post I mentioned that there is free alternatives out there for Analytics+IAP's, which is true, and I've use them in the past with no issues. However, it is so much more convenient to use Untiy's solution since it is built right in. $225 per month for that conveniance? No way... But for $25...sure! And add on splash screen removal on all platforms for $30? I could easily do $55 a month for splash screen removal ($30) and Analytics + IAP ($25).

    I don't pay for anything I don't need (cloud build, team license, prioritized bug handling, game performance reporting, beta access, etc..) and I get something back for every dollar that I spent.
     
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  28. neginfinity

    neginfinity

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    IIRC, before unity 5 personal edition was castrated, I mean stripped down.
    IIRC there were restrictions on number of dynamic lights and some other stuff. I also remember looking at feature list for unity 4 free and thinking "this is ridiculous, I'm not working with that". Limitations were quite heavy handed. So, compared to that, I think splash screen is a better option.
     
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  29. Martin_H

    Martin_H

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    Unity 4 free was so castrated that I'd have rather not worked on games at all because I couldn't bear how crappy the lighting looked.




    Unity 5 personal edition was about half the reason why I'm here today and I think this was a really smart business move. I'll happily pay the pro price once I meet the criteria for needing it, if I know I'll stick with gamedev that long. But I just couldn't justify dropping over 1000,- € on the hunch that ich might like working in Unity, because I have a really bad history of buying expensive stuff and then never really using it.
    So I'm really grateful for the opportunity to test the waters first, that the personal edition represents.

    If I were to do contract work in Unity I'd see it as "meeting one of the criteria for needing the pro version" because wanting to make the splashscreen go away is something that I or my client wants.

    Have you ever noticed how many logos are in the splash screens of big game productions? I think we might be taking it a little too much for granted, that there is a way to get rid of a unity logo / splash screen at all. As far as I know, there is plenty of middleware that does not give you a choice there, you have to display their logo in a splash screen.
     
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  30. mdrotar

    mdrotar

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    If they're putting as much effort into the individual Android support and iOS support as they are the rest of the engine (as the prices $1500 + $1500+ $1500 would suggest), then I would've expected a better mobile development experience.
     
  31. Ostwind

    Ostwind

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    However those logos are usually styled for the game and/or have professional look as their own. When I released some of the earliest stuff from myself or for customer, the neutral "Powered by Unity" splash screen was not bad at all next to the other screens. I've been a pro user since U3 and for 3-4 it was mainly cause of the pro engine features and not the splash screen. Now the features are "gone" but the free version splash screen was changed and nerfed to possibly balance that.

    I don't have anything against the personal edition and it for having all the engine features. I actually think it's a good thing for everyone and for example would not leave dark skin out of it as keeping it as a "feature" in pro is silly and feels "we ran out of pro features for marketing".

    My main issue with pro currently is that its "value" seems to gone down a lot. I'm no longer paying for the engine features but rather only for the splash screen. Almost all of the other pro features or services are still work in progress or bling bling style dark skin, beta access or to be a part of a monthly lottery for asset discounts. The cloud build with limited time for pro users makes me think I'm a trial user. I also don't care about desktop releasing and would not mind the animated logo there for my personal projects but for mobile platforms I also have to pay the core pro cost every time. I can easily see why people are/were disappointed on these and other forums.

    For staying on topic I sure hope that if Unity is going subscription only in future it will also include a non time limited subscriber tiers for each of the services (UNET, IAP, Analytics, etc.) or a point pool for subscriber to pick the desired services with various levels.

    In regards my earlier post, with perpetual licenses it's at least a bit easier to justify yourself that things might get better as there is still time left till next major release of Unity instead of looking your monthly subscription bill and thinking how this month was wasted or not worth it again as something its still in beta or jumping back and forth in the road map tagged as at risk or delayed :rolleyes:
     
  32. blazespinnaker

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    Perpetual simply doesn't work in fast moving industry like this. Makes no sense at all to buy it or sell it. All it does is encourage people to stagnate in their innovation and development and messes with the ecosystem with everyone on different versions. It becomes a support nightmare for asset sellers as well. If you want to make stuff without having to update to the latest and greatest, become a blacksmith or something.

    The other nice thing about getting rid of perpetual is that it spreads the cost of subscription among everyone, so those of who subscribe don't have to foot the bill for the perpetual licenses.

    Thank god for getting rid of perpetual.
     
  33. blazespinnaker

    blazespinnaker

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    This. The royalty model is a freaking nerve wracking nightmare. These guys hunt you down viciously, too, they have to or nobody would pay.
     
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  34. Ostwind

    Ostwind

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    Seems you might not have enough experience when you say that. Perpetual, subscription or personal edition, it does not matter much. People don't just jump to the latest major or minor version every time one is released. There are still teams with Unity 4 projects out there even though they might have had Unity 5 in their hands for over a year. Sometimes its too much effort (cost) to upgrade a project to latest even if you already have the latest version bought.

    Unity 4 -> Unity 5 is probably one of the best examples with the major lightmapping changes that have been almost game breaking for some projects.
     
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  35. blazespinnaker

    blazespinnaker

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    That's a completely different problem. Obviously, Unity has to break things less if they're going to charge subscription fees otherwise they are scamming their customers.
     
  36. zenGarden

    zenGarden

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    Unreal 4 is Royalties based, if Unity would come back to subscription for everyone, they would loose lot of people.

    This is why subscription model won't work for many users.
     
  37. Ostwind

    Ostwind

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    No it's not and I'm talking about the thing you think gets solved by killing perpetual license, meaning things would evolve faster and everyone would be on the latest versions. It might usually work with programs like Adobe Photoshop where you just open image files and save them back to same format but with more complex tools it's not that simple.

    It's a pretty common thing in the gaming industry or in development in general that used tools remain mostly same during the development and after the release for projects unless there are significant gains without huge efforts in terms of upgrading. For example teams might have complex art pipelines (custom scripts/plugins etc.) built for certain versions of their modeling and art tools and the next major version could have significant changes in the interfaces or even deprecate features and there is no need or time for such during the development so they stay with the old version.

    Same stuff happens in software business. Development tools such as Visual Studio or Delphi evolve almost yearly and sometimes drop support for older technologies or features which are still in use and will remain usable with the older versions. Teams remain to use older versions in some cases cause they have hundreds of customers using older database version or technology that are not supported in the latest development tools.

    Same thing applies to Unity with code/engine features etc. and changing to subscription only won't change this problem in general at all.
     
  38. Ryiah

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    You're making the assumption that they would leave Unity for another engine. Okay. What's the other engine then?
     
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  39. mdrotar

    mdrotar

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    That would depend on why a person chose Unity in the first place. But with the way Unity has been changing, it shouldn't be a surprise that people would reevaluate their options before investing further time and money into Unity.
     
  40. Ryiah

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    That's just it. What options are there aside from Unity? It may have problems but it allows you to target the most platforms with the least amount of time. How many other engines can claim that? How many of them are not restricted to 2D?
     
  41. Kiwasi

    Kiwasi

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    This. I'm currently at an awkward stage of my game development career. I haven't made over the 100k mark. But my income is sufficient that it needs to go on a tax return. If I was using the unreal royalty based model I would currently be paying fees. With Unity's model I'm still getting free use of a great engine.

    Even if I do decide to go pro, managing a flat fee is significantly easier then managing royalties.
     
  42. landon912

    landon912

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    I really don't like subscription based models and neither does my work. We want to be able to continue to buy one-time licenses instead of paying a stupid amount of money over time.
     
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  43. zenGarden

    zenGarden

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    There is other alternatives, some are free , royaltie based or open source.
    For many users that are not making money, or shipped a game, or not working in some indie company, a susbcription would just not suit hobbyst, first game users, indie starters.

    After Unity 4 became free, Unity 5 became free with full features, i don't think this is possible to come back to subscription or feature based Unity versions. Lot of users are debugging and testing Unity features and they are not paid, Enlighten for example is far from finished and stable (too long baking mix mode not here etc ...) , so i am not sure going back to subscription would benefit Unity.
    While Royalties would be more suitable , becaue you would pay some money only when you succeed and make enought money.
     
  44. Ryiah

    Ryiah

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2012
    Posts:
    16,892
    If you're not making money or not shipping a game... why would you need Unity Pro? That's a very easy answer. You wouldn't need it. You'd still be on Unity Personal and this change wouldn't affect you until you actually needed Pro.
     
    angrypenguin likes this.
  45. Yash987654321

    Yash987654321

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    Posts:
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    Ads in community could be a great source of income lol
     
    darkhog likes this.
  46. hippocoder

    hippocoder

    Digital Ape Moderator

    Joined:
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    Posts:
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    I think the main oversight for Unity here was thinking "more reasons = more fish in the net" but what it really means when your audience has smart people in it is "more reasons I don't need = flexible pricing".

    So basically there needs to be only 3 perks for Pro to be worth it:

    - custom support tickets, 1 per month, same as paid support, but you get one question a month.
    - all the services for the duration of subscription or major version - 12 months is too short.
    - no splash screen.

    The rest just dilute and confuse the customer base. We don't want to see lots of tiny things we don't think are worth much. We would rather see 3 big guns.

    Frankly with this plan, Unity could go sub-only, since the support - getting a clear major answer from Unity support - would bring people back monthly. That alone is worth $75 really.
     
    daisySa, Trigve, Socrates and 4 others like this.
  47. angrypenguin

    angrypenguin

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    Dec 29, 2011
    Posts:
    13,679
    Shouldn't they be doing that anyway? Even if everything was rainbows and unicorns, periodical reevaluation is important.
     
    Martin_H, Ryiah and Kiwasi like this.
  48. Kiwasi

    Kiwasi

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    Which strikes me as odd. In my industry the subscription model would be preferred. Its marginally more expensive. But it delays the expense dramatically, which is good for cash flow. Plus there is (some) flexibility to ramp up and down the number of licenses.
     
  49. landon912

    landon912

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2011
    Posts:
    1,573
    Perpetual gives us options. Subscription forces us to continue to pay, even if we aren't interested in the benefits of free version upgrading.

    We have ~15 developers in engine. Let's look at our subscription over the average 3 year Unity release cycle.

    Perpetual: $22,500 ($45,000 with upgrade to next version)
    Subscription: $40,500(Possible another year required to upgrade depending on how release and renewal dates fall , $53,500)

    Perpetual allows us to further control our plans.It doesn't make sense to go with subscription unless you're paying for the free upgrades. Otherwise, it's a total waste of money. Perpetual allows up to evaluate whether the costs justify the paying for an upgrade. If not, then we saved $20k. If we do want to, then it's more expensive in the short term, but once again better in the long term.(We'd probably wait a few months to make sure it's stable anyways, once again saving us money.)
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2016
    elias_t, darkhog, ippdev and 2 others like this.
  50. Kiwasi

    Kiwasi

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    Fair enough. I come from an industry where money spent tomorrow is often better then money spent today. But if capital is cheap, then perpetual is a good way to go.
     
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