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Need some input for level design

Discussion in 'Game Design' started by gunshow, Apr 29, 2019.

  1. gunshow

    gunshow

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2018
    Posts:
    1
    hi guy's quick question, how do you design and prep your levels? would you model the scene in a 3d editor like 3d max or would you break it down into segments? i am a 3d artist but i dont often make my own scenes so i dont know what the best approach is.

    for example if i make a indoor game level like a hospital, would you model the whole base environment (hallways,rooms) into one model? or would you break it into segments kind of like fps creator used to do.

    thnx
     
  2. Steve_Stevens

    Steve_Stevens

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    May 3, 2016
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    I have been thinking about the same thing. I need a city. I have low poly models, but cannot draw to save my life! I was thinking maybe I build the city block by block in blender(I can still animate the windows and doors) then import each block into unity. I think having bigger "chunks" will be more performant when they are culled when out of view. But, I haven't gotten that far into my project yet. I'm still prototyping classes and working out on paper the client/server fun stuff. Since I am HORRIBLE at world design and all, I am kind of putting all that off until I HAVE to do it. When ever I get bored of flying around primitives, or driving around my terrain painted world. I am pretty sure I will want the race tracks as 1 full object that I can just plop down in designated area. Same with the airports and shipyard. I just lack the skills to lay it out in unity. If it was as easy as doing a finite state machine for AI, I'd be done by now! lol
     
  3. kdgalla

    kdgalla

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    Mar 15, 2013
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    I like to create small, modular objects in the 3D modeler (blender in my case) and assemble them in the Unity editor. For me, level editing is always an iterative process of testing and adjusting, so I'm constantly changing things at a broad scope. It's much easier to be able to do that directly in the editor.
     
  4. SparrowsNest

    SparrowsNest

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    Apr 6, 2017
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    For stuff like race tracks why not make a couple of base graphics and procedurally build a race track by defining a 3D curve?, kinda like Cities skylines does it. this requires a custom editor tool

    maybe even a roller coaster tycoon style build tool, they actually have a racetrack there.
     
  5. newjerseyrunner

    newjerseyrunner

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2017
    Posts:
    619
    I also break my levels up into a few rooms each. I also separate places where the player and go and places that are further away (so that the lightmap resolution can be far lower for stuff in the distance.) For pieces that are especially intricate, I may have two models, one highly detailed one which doesn’t have any collision and a low poly version which is invisible and used only for its collider.

    I use trigger volumes to load and unload areas in a script as the player moves.
     
  6. kdgalla

    kdgalla

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    Another advantage of making modular parts is that you can make several different buildings and other features using the same small set of pieces. So it can reduce your overall modelling time because you can reuse all of the elements but still create unique buildings. You can see countless examples of this on the AssetStore. This is just a random, simple one:

    https://assetstore.unity.com/packages/3d/environments/roman-city-low-poly-pack-1-92702

    In the image, you can see first the pieces included with the kit and then also examples of buildings that are made from these same pieces.
     
  7. BrandyStarbrite

    BrandyStarbrite

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2013
    Posts:
    1,151
    This is a interesting question.

    To answer your question, usually in most cases,.....yes.
    Stuff that don't move, eg. The entire level, floor, roof, rooms in single level, hallways, is usually one whole model.

    Stuff that you want to move in the game, or stuff that can move, like tables, chairs, hospital beds, ceiling fans, are usually seperate props.

    However:
    If things like tables, hospital beds, bins etc. are not made to be moveable, you can still make them, as seperate props from the enviroment.

    Another important thing to consider, is that according to the type of game you're making, and what you want to do in the game, that can also affect, how you go about modelling stuff too.