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Need Development Team

Discussion in 'Connected Games' started by Mirxcle, Aug 1, 2018.

  1. Mirxcle

    Mirxcle

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2018
    Posts:
    1
    I need a team who is willing to work with me on my game idea's and add onto them to a degree. I also need a team who is willing to work with me for free until the game can make profit. I'm looking to make a full, well received, and competitive game. While most games now whether it's console or PC are competitive, I want to bring a new way of competitive play. Details can be talked over in email or on this site via messaging. I'm looking forward to getting help and making a team and friends!
     
  2. Whippets

    Whippets

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2013
    Posts:
    1,725
    Everyone has bills and families to feed. I don't think they'll work for the promise of honey in the future, what with the % of games that turn into vapourware or cancellation. Also you'll need to set up a legal framework, business, and agreements all of which cost money.
     
    Ryiah and Joe-Censored like this.
  3. csofranz

    csofranz

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2017
    Posts:
    98
    "I'm looking to make a full, well received, and competitive game"

    Everyone is. If the only thing you bring to the table is an idea - well, everyone here thinks that they already have a better one. I surely do :)
     
    Ryiah, Joe-Censored and Driiade like this.
  4. Joe-Censored

    Joe-Censored

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Posts:
    3,593
  5. Joe-Censored

    Joe-Censored

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Posts:
    3,593
    If you're building a team to create a competitive multiplayer game you're going to have to pay them for the work. Most games are not profitable, and a multiplayer game requires a significantly larger amount of development work in comparison to a typical single player game.

    That all means they are going to be working on your project for free for a pretty long time on the hope that the team can hold together long enough to complete the project, that your marketing budget is large enough to properly promote the game, and that your marketing experience is good enough to effectively promote the game into that rare space of profitability. Since you didn't mention your extensive marketing experience, can I assume you also need someone to do that for free as well? And since you aren't paying the developers, can I also assume your marketing budget is $0?
     
    Whippets likes this.
  6. Njb_

    Njb_

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2015
    Posts:
    20
    So you want slave labor? Go f*** yourself buddy.
     
    trappist-1 and Joe-Censored like this.
  7. trappist-1

    trappist-1

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2017
    Posts:
    287
    Though the above comment was very hilarious, I don't think it's entirely apt.

    I often wish I had found a team of like-minded individuals who shared my vision and were willing to sacrifice as much as I am to see it through.

    That being said, I never found such a team. So, I just do my best to construct my games in such a way that makes it easier for someone in the future (or myself) to pick it back up and continue to improve.

    I sometimes believe I could meet like-minded people by taking some courses at my local college?
    Anyone here have any other suggestions where game devs could meet other game devs?
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2018
  8. Ryiah

    Ryiah

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2012
    Posts:
    12,311
    It's not impossible to find a team but you will need to bring more to the table than just an idea. I joined a collaborative project myself a little over a year ago to assist with the creation of a prototype to show to potential investors with the long term goal that we would get funded and my role would gain a paying contract.

    What convinced me to join the group though wasn't the idea. If I had been presented with just the idea I would have turned it down immediately. There were three factors that convinced me to give the group a shot. Keep in mind these are not in order as I'm not completely positive I could say which were more important than the others.

    First, I was already interested in becoming part of a group project. Up until that point I had only very limited experience working with other people and only as a hobbyist. I wanted the experience of working with a group and I wanted to move towards being a professional.

    Second, they already had a prototype. Having a prototype showed right away that they were serious enough that they were not just going to sit there uselessly waiting on someone. If you can't at least show some effort you're not worth the time of the people you are trying to recruit.

    Third, I already knew another member of the group. I won't specify who it was but they're a member of this community and were the ones extending the invitation over private message. They had been a member of the community for a bit longer than myself and were very actively helping people in it which led me to be far less skeptive of the group.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2018
  9. newjerseyrunner

    newjerseyrunner

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2017
    Posts:
    406
    I'm not sure how many people are willing to work for someone else for free. People want compensation for their work and they aren't going to do your hobby game for you. People who are interested in making their own game will do exactly that: make a game themselves, they sure as hell won't do it for someone else. You have to make it worth it for them. What exactly would make it worth it? A potential for a large payoff if your game is successful? How's that different than playing the lottery? The only reason anyone would even consider such a thing is for networking. You have one post on this forum and a google search of your name doesn't bring me to any games or pages that would make me think that you are capable of building and publishing a game. Most games, especially those by people who've never made one before will not ever see the light of day, sometimes they give up after less than a week. The only people who can attract teams just with an idea are guys like John Romaro.
     
    Joe-Censored and TwoTen like this.
  10. trappist-1

    trappist-1

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2017
    Posts:
    287
    So realistically most of us will never be able to recruit our own team. But if you remain ambitious, and demonstrate your capabilities well, maybe a team will recruit you..??
     
  11. Ellernate

    Ellernate

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2017
    Posts:
    81
    you recruit a team with compensation.. maybe if you're a really experienced coder or artist someone good might take it on as a side project, but that is rarely the case
     
    Joe-Censored likes this.
  12. csofranz

    csofranz

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2017
    Posts:
    98
    Well, the usual way to recruit people is by offering compensation (usually money, there was time I would have worked for good food :) ). If you are doing Open Source you usually can get a team if you also bring a working prototype to the table, and everyone understands that the result will be non-profit.

    Of course, a few select people can recruit a team by sheer recognition and/or credibility. If Sid Meier or John Carmack wrote that they looked for a team of free slaves, half of this forum would sign up - I say half only because the other half is too young to recognize these names :) And Chris Roberts was famously able to raise in excess of $140 million on his name alone.

    For almost anyone else: ideas are cheap, and money talks.
     
    Joe-Censored likes this.
  13. Joe-Censored

    Joe-Censored

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Posts:
    3,593
    Yeah name recognition can certainly be used to get funding or labor. That obviously works because the name alone conveys both an expected quality standard and a presumption of profitability based on past success.

    If someone like Steven Spielberg asked for help on his own movie pet project, you could expect a similar result.

    I don't think the OP has that kind of name recognition though..... :p
     
    Ellernate likes this.