Search Unity

looks like UDK has self shadowing, dof and more on their mobile engine...

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by hippocoder, Mar 7, 2012.

  1. hippocoder

    hippocoder

    Digital Ape Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2010
    Posts:
    26,073
  2. janpec

    janpec

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2010
    Posts:
    3,520
    Holly S***, thats Mass Effect on mobile platform.
     
  3. HeadClot

    HeadClot

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2010
    Posts:
    212
    Indeed it is :)
     
  4. TehWut

    TehWut

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2011
    Posts:
    1,577
    So I'm guessing it's a battle between AAA PC and an improved mobile engine. The trailer looked mighty fine. What do?
     
  5. n0mad

    n0mad

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2009
    Posts:
    3,732
    I don't want to troll up, but there's a 3.5 to fix before that :p
     
  6. jc_lvngstn

    jc_lvngstn

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    Posts:
    1,503
    Yeah...gotta agree with ya :D
     
  7. n0mad

    n0mad

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2009
    Posts:
    3,732
    I admit their showreel is quite impressive ...


    But in the end, all those effects are available in Unity Pro aswell. Or if they're not, they're just additional fancy.
    Except 2 features I was in awe by watching the showreel:
    - Landscape Fiolage Editor (3:05, was stunned by 3:25)
    - Simplygon Mesh reduction (4:05)

    Those 2 look like ultra powerful tools.
     
  8. hippocoder

    hippocoder

    Digital Ape Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2010
    Posts:
    26,073
    Can't do a lot of it in unity. There's no escaping the fact you get these effects OUT OF THE BOX with udk, but in unity, you're not going to get much. You get the ability, but do you have the talent to design shaders like that? nope.

    UDK has it out of the box.

    In unity you'll need to do a ton of work and maybe not succeed to do udk's mobile effects. They are all amazingly optimised too. Their kit has come a long way since I last looked at it...

    Then it also supports scaleform on mobile - fast as well, and optimised for it. Currently Simian Squared have no actual reason to remain with unity right now after viewing that video. Of course we will - we have invested a lot of time and effort into unity.

    This is the businessman in me speaking. However, I am not just a businessman. I'm sure unity is going to bounce back with the essential mobile polish. I am waiting for that to happen. I'm expecting that unity mobile will have the following:

    1. realtime shadows - options for low detail versions
    2. colour stuff
    3. proper dof and sunshafts shaders. These things need to scale right down detail wise for speed.
    4. anything else UDK is currently kicking your butts with.

    It's gonna get really cut throat now unity. You've had a good ride... but a lot of that was your superior platform support. Now it is an even playing field and there's clear elements where UDK is outdoing you and that is in mobile.

    I mean what the heck?! you publicise the new lightprobes feature but don't include the character BRDF shader that's similar to shadowgun's shader. You did say you were going to release it. Why are you even QUESTIONING if you should release it or not? it should have been OUT in beta! you ** DO ** want your users making the best possible graphics and promoting unity don't you? come on, people, read the sense of what I am telling you. Time is also short. Let us fly with your creation, don't hold us back without realising it. Help your users really show unity off. Make it easier for us to promote you.

    (I am mostly a mobile developer so of course this is biased. But it is not wrong).
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  9. n0mad

    n0mad

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2009
    Posts:
    3,732
    Ha yes, I forgot the native mobile Scaleform .......... Huge third difference, I admit.
    I'm gonna get sad when I'll see that the Unity version will need another 1000$ :(
     
  10. SteveJ

    SteveJ

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2010
    Posts:
    3,042
    I'm also significantly invested in Unity at this point, but I must admit that I visit the UDK pages and forum more and more these days to see what's happening. They've got some amazing features... and man would I like to try out Scaleform...

    Biggest deterrents for me at this point are the programming language and the fact that the editor won't run on MacOS.

    Then there's the fact that I look at all those awesome features and ask myself if I really have the skills to use them anyway. I'm a one-man-band with what I'd describe as intermediate skills, so as it is, I'm not really pushing Unity anywhere near its limits anyway.

    I can definitely understand more experienced developers with much more ambitious plans taking a long hard look at the comparison though, and possibly leaning hard towards UDK.

    I do get a chuckle though every time some kid comes in here and rants about how they think they'll go with UDK because their COD clone is going to look so much better for it when they launch it on PS3 and 360...
     
  11. Daydreamer66

    Daydreamer66

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2009
    Posts:
    125
    With all the talk of keeping up with Epic, don't forget that Unreal Engine 4 is being shown for the first time to a select few at the GDC. Rumors say it's "gasp" worthy. We probably won't see it in wide game usage until at least 2014, but Epic is putting it out there now as the "go to" engine for developing the next generation of games (Wii U, XBox 720, PS4, future PC, future mobile, etc).

    I admit I'm really curious to see what all the fuss is about, especially given what UE3 can do. At this point in time, I can't think of much that would make game developers gasp short of photo-realism.

    I know! Maybe they finally perfected that illusive BUILD GAME button. :eek:
     
  12. TehWut

    TehWut

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2011
    Posts:
    1,577
    I also heard that Unreal Engine 4 is "mind blowing". Guess we'll have to wait and see.
     
  13. actuallystarky

    actuallystarky

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2010
    Posts:
    183
    I hear your frustration Hippo. UDK is spanking Unity big time at the moment in terms of graphic polish.

    Console yourself with this thought. 18 months ago I hit a snag in my UDK project. I simply wanted to rotate an AI model. After lots and lots and lots of hair-pulling, frustration and digging through an inheritance chain from hell* I eventually hacked a very ugly solution.

    I posted a question on their forums which was never answered. Just recently I searched again figuring that by now someone must have an easy solution. To my deleight I found two threads covering the same problem. No clean solution was ever found. You have to temporarily disable physics or lock their rotation or hack about in some potentially game-breaking way in order to simply rotate an enemy character.

    So I think of that and smile every time I see some sweet UDK shaders or their animtree editor or their cutscene editor or their real-time shadows. I mightn't be developing with the prettiest engine around but at least I can turn my characters however I damn well please.

    *those inheritance chains inevitably ending with "native" C++ classes that you can't edit or even view.
     
  14. Daydreamer66

    Daydreamer66

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2009
    Posts:
    125
    No, you misunderstood me. I wasn't using hyperbole. Apparently, it literally made people gasp:

    Epic's GDC 2012 Unreal Engine Demo
     
  15. keithsoulasa

    keithsoulasa

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2012
    Posts:
    1,984
    I'm still not skilled enough for UDK ...

    IF I was , i might build my same game in UDK- for the simple fact I don't need to pony up 3k to go andriod pro( their are some very advance audio features I want to try )

    Not like id ever make over 50k off a game anyway
     
  16. OmniverseProduct

    OmniverseProduct

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2012
    Posts:
    1,569
    You never know
     
  17. HolBol

    HolBol

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2010
    Posts:
    2,884
    Hmm, I thnk this shows- we need a cross between Unity and UDK. Unity's workflow, and interface, with the graphics abilities of UDK.
    And damn, I saw WiiU support in there! And texturepainting... ugh, if I could do the in unity, and easily, it would be great.
     
  18. Dan Fury

    Dan Fury

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Posts:
    158
    UDK could have realtime photorealistic rendering on a calculator and I still wouldn't care.

    For me there is no comparison between the two, no mobile dev in their right mind should choose UDK over Unity and as far as I know nearly nobody does. The only UDK game I know of that wasn't done by Epic is Dungeon Defenders, which was done by Trendy Entertainment, their neighbors who surely got a special price and were able to use it before anybody else. On the other hand you won't find a Game Jam where nobody is using Unity nowadays.

    You can buy and own a copy of Unity and do with it whatever you want, you don't buy and own a copy of the Unreal engine, because you have to give Epic it's atrocious share.
     
  19. Filto

    Filto

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    Posts:
    697
    I believe Unity will for a long time be helplessly behind when it comes to power and graphics regardless of platform. You choose Unity because it is quick, easy and flexible to work with. Indie devs might use Unity throughout production where as larger game developers use Unity for prototyping then switch to more powerful engine to create the game. Mobile games are mostly done by indie devs or smaller game companies and for them Unity is probably a great tool to work with. There is still some money involved for the lone developer to dish out for Unity though and with UDK being free and showing of great tools they might attract more and more devs. I say yay for competition it will only benefit us!
     
  20. keithsoulasa

    keithsoulasa

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2012
    Posts:
    1,984
    Of course the ironic thing is that UDK games need bigger teams, and once you have like 10 guys working, theirs a good chance your going to hit 50k in sales .

    For me its an ease of use thing, like UDK is just too hard
     
  21. Tiles

    Tiles

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2010
    Posts:
    2,474
    ... which doesn`t really happen to lots of users because you have to earn around 40k a year with your game before you even need to pay a dime to Epic. And that`s a barrer that indie developers rarely hit. Then take into account that a game earns most of the money in the first three months. Means in the second year your earning can look totally different, and you might drop below the 40k barrer then. Even when you have risen it in the first try.

    It simply a thing of calculation and a thing of what game you want to develop if it`s worth it. UDK delivers a high quality engine with lots of things out of the box that saves you lots of developer time. And there are more than enough happy and satisfied users. Else this business model would die sooner or later. But it still exists, and Unreal is popular.

    There are other things than the business model that stops me from using UDK. The business model is in fact one thing that i would love to have for Unity too. But i`m just a hobbyist, and so a bit selfish at this point :)
     
  22. Metron

    Metron

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2009
    Posts:
    999
    I must admit that recently I have taken quite some peeks into the UDK. The feature set is stunning along with the quality you can produce. Porting my current game "Insane Robots" to UDK should not be that difficult but then, the workflow itself has to be changed.

    The UDK learning curve is quite steep (compared to Unity).
     
  23. janpec

    janpec

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2010
    Posts:
    3,520
    Thats what i keep saying. Proper color posteffect, dof, sunshafts and AO are needed in Unity, and not just for mobile for PC version too. Current versions are barely useable since they provide semi-quallity results. And for those who are saying that any developer can writte them by yourself, the point is that indie developer does not have 1 year time just to change what should be in engine on first place, but rather focous on actual game development.
     
  24. Filto

    Filto

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    Posts:
    697
    I agree with you but to face the fact. If you are a professional game artist you will look at Unity and say, naaah can't produce to the quality I want. If you are a professional game coder you will look at Unity and say, naaah to limiting for me I can't do what I want. So in the end Unity is for hobby developers and is catered for that audience and with that comes many limitations. Unity is not a tool for the pros its a tool for the hobbyist, but it is a fun hobby indead :)
     
  25. actuallystarky

    actuallystarky

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2010
    Posts:
    183
    Could you please not presume to speak for all professional games developers? I have worked with quite a few coders who shudder at the mere mention of working in the Unreal coding environment. I've worked with quite a few artists who are happy to produce stunning art in Unity. Some of their work features on the Unity website. And don't forget the successful mobile developers carving out a good living using Unity like Mika mobile.

    I do agree that Unity is more suited to small-scale production at the moment and the Unreal engine works better on the large scale but please do not believe you are speaking for the professional game community at large.
     
  26. keithsoulasa

    keithsoulasa

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2012
    Posts:
    1,984
    +1
     
  27. TylerPerry

    TylerPerry

    Joined:
    May 29, 2011
    Posts:
    5,577
    Tell that to all the big companies that use Unity. Also loads of people hear use unity for most there stuff and do it for a job.
     
  28. Daydreamer66

    Daydreamer66

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2009
    Posts:
    125
    To clarify, Dungeon Defense by Trendy was made in four weeks to demonstrate UDK's launch capabilities. The retail version of their game, Dungeon Defenders, was made with a full UE3 license. It seems that lots of teams, upon reaching the $50,000 sales threshold, end up negotiating a full license (always under NDA), which makes me think that the terms aren't all that bad.

    Per games released, there seem to be quite a few more than DD. Most of the games listed on their Showcase page were created by indie teams. IndieDB lists almost 300 UDK releases. And checking the UDK Forum - Released Projects page, I see eight indie mobile games listed just on page one - SMinis, Bacoom, Zombie Cat Slayer, Boulder Run, Chinese Paladin 5, Robot Gladi8tor, Paradise Golf, and Flying Mind.

    @Filto: Plenty of professional developers love Unity. Ever heard of Battlestar Galactica?
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  29. Dreamora

    Dreamora

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2008
    Posts:
    26,603
    UDK has quite a few listed titles thats right but most of them show how bad UDK actually is as they are either not really enjoyable, performant or both.

    UDK has a lot of power but lets face the facts:

    1. the way of interacting with it with unreal script is a nightmare. 'on the fly changes' or even without restarting - nope
    2. UDK can do a lot but the learning curve is massive if its meant to be a non shooter as the examples offered outside the 'graphic slut department' is minimal
    3. As especially Dungeon Defenders shows: UDK is good if you have highly experienced staff like Epic that knows how to work with the hardware inside out, but already DD sucks badly on the performance end. You can not even play it at full resolution on an ipad 2 without it stuttering and its levels have a laughable visualy quality by ANY stretch, there is nothing even remotely heavy going on. So 'does all out of the box' is as bad as it is with unity, as mobiles are no pc and halfarsed optimizations simply don't cut it, its too bad that 'graphic slutiness' normally ensures a 5 star rating vs a 2 star rating for the unsteady performance
     
  30. janpec

    janpec

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2010
    Posts:
    3,520
    The point is that, more or less Filto is right. Sure there are big companies that use Unity too, but looking it from big picture the ratio between big companies that use UDK and those that use Unity is ofcourse well known.

    Thats great sum-up. Basically all reasons why i wont get hands on UDK for a while.
    On higher resolutions UE3/UDK needs a lot of power, not just on mobiles PC games like Mass Effect is good example too. You can pretty much enter in very empty scene in Normandy ship, with less than 20.000 triangles and maybe less than 10 materials loaded on scene, all posteffects excluded and performance will still be bad on lower machines unless played in lowest resolution. In Unity scenes like that work with over 100 fps on highest resolutions. But then on other hand there isnt huge gap in performance on heavy scenes in UDK while in Unity is. Basically both of them have faults on either side.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  31. TylerPerry

    TylerPerry

    Joined:
    May 29, 2011
    Posts:
    5,577
    UDK is not Unreal engine? onless unreal engine games are included then i can hardly think of one UDK game? (i dont realy care for UDK so i havent serched)
     
  32. janpec

    janpec

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2010
    Posts:
    3,520
    Ofcourse UDK is Unreal engine with modified licensing and less platforms. Well just take a little search you will find dozens of great UDK games, plenty of them made by small teams and AAA quallity.
     
  33. saymoo

    saymoo

    Joined:
    May 19, 2009
    Posts:
    850
    @tifanty:
    Mobile support is the same in Unreal Engine as in UDK, just as all the other features. So on that part there is no difference at all between the two. The only difference is sourcecode access (PS3/Xbox support), same as with unity btw. (you can get the sourcecode for Unity , with a special license. Just as you can get Unreal Engine (= udk with sourcecode) with a special license. and XBOX/PS3 is also sold seperately with a special license)

    UDK is a prebuild release, just as Unity (pro) is/

    And don't forget, Mobile support in UDK/Unreal Engine is very new, where Unity has it several years already. So not too many dev's do have a mobile game ready to publish (made with UDK), but it will come.. don't you worry.

    Graphics (renderer) wise, UDK kicks Unity's behind big time at the moment of writing. (on pc and iOS both!)

    And for those who say, that UDK is difficult or only usable for huge teams:
    UDK is not more difficult than Unity, it's different! (the build in editors of UDK are quite feature rich and userfriendly, once you are used to the workflow/interface)
    Same as Windows users switching to OSX overnight, or vice versa.. (note: and not having touched the other OS once!)
    it's a different world, than someone is used to. But when you are used to the new world, you can really see the potentials/wonders the new world can offer or offers.
    There are examples of 1 or 2 dev's making UDK games, so no need for big teams at all.

    In other worlds, it's a personal preference in the end.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  34. Daydreamer66

    Daydreamer66

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2009
    Posts:
    125
    Every widely available engine, not just UDK, has poorly made games released by its less experienced/less talented users. If Unity was judged only by its poorest creations, this forum would be almost empty.

    Personally, I enjoy many of the games made by both. It's really all about the gameplay, anyway. Graphic sluttiness is just gravy.

    See my post above. There's lots of UDK (not UE3) stuff out there.

    This.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  35. PixelEnvision

    PixelEnvision

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2012
    Posts:
    486
    I've also looked at UDK when shopping for a new tool, indeed it's capabilities are impressive but I'm targeting mobile and for me, lack of Android support (in UDK, or you can have it by paying full license for UE3) was the biggest deal breaker...
     
  36. MABManZ

    MABManZ

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2011
    Posts:
    144
    If UDK had proper Android support I would be using it, honestly. However I do like the 3rd party tools available on Unity.
     
  37. dogzerx2

    dogzerx2

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Posts:
    3,822
    I'd just love to use all those UDK features, sadly UDK isn't user friendly at ALL! how do I know? because UDK is in my hdd, and I'm too scared to open it.
     
  38. Swearsoft

    Swearsoft

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Posts:
    1,621
    +1
     
  39. KRGraphics

    KRGraphics

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Posts:
    3,976
    I'm using UDK now myself in class, and while I like it, I've stuck with Unity at home because of ease of use, a S***LOAD of texture formats that I can use, model formats, and ease of adding things... and Unity works with REAL WORLD UNITS, which I always work with. Not only that, but I love the fact that I place my assets, textures, and lights in a scene, and it just works (in UDK, you have to rebuild your lighting if you make a change, which slows me down, especially if you make a TINY change).

    In UDK, I have to find some magical formula to make sure my model works in UDK, since I can't use my real world scaled model at all. I also love that all of my assets can Auto-update in Unity... (haven't seen this in UDK), and I don't have to tinker with a bunch of options to get my scene looking right, especially lighting settings (not knocking UDK, I like it actually). As an indie developer, I am not too concerned with graphical fidelity (my current project is sort of showing how far I can push Unity in the graphics department, due to my CG background), but I want to make sure my game plays nice and lasts. I also own a Pro Licence and i am PROUD to be a Unity user... i also use the engine to showcase my portfolio and the graphical detail still shows...

    THE ENGINE YOU USE SHOULD MEAN LITTLE... IT IS THE ART AND TALENT THAT SHOULD PREVAIL!!! Sorry for caps...
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  40. KRGraphics

    KRGraphics

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Posts:
    3,976
    +1
     
  41. Filto

    Filto

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    Posts:
    697
    I am not speaking for all professional game developers I am speaking for the majority of professional game developers. There are always exceptions. I am baseing my thoughts on A. Friends in the gaming industry whom I have discussed the subject with many times (I always try to push people towards Unity.) B. Talking to Unitystaff on the subject C. Looking at released titles. D. Comparing the ratio user/succesfull titles

    But hey it would be fun to try to check this.

    First line up the number of professional game developers in the world. That would be people working at a game company that makes a living from their games. How big percentage of their games are produced with Unity?

    Now lets line up the number of hobby game developers in the world. That would be people creating games as a hobby, not making a living out of it. How big percentage of their games are produced with Unity?

    Would that show if Unity is mainly a professional tool or a tool for the hobbyist?

    Not fair you think cause obviously more people use Unity because it is such an easy tool and afforedable so it attracts more hobby developers, that doesn't mean its not catered for professionals

    Ok lets look at the amount of revenue generated from released games by the professional gaming industry, all hobbyist that release games must go then of course cause they don't earn a living from their games even if they generate some money. Surely that is more fair after all professional means making a living out of making games. How big slice of the revenue do you think Unity stands for?

    Now tell me again is Unity mainly a tool catered for hobby game developers or professional game developers?

    There is nothing wrong with that though. Unity set out to create a tool that made game development accessible for people outside the professional gaming industry, now even the little man with dreams of developing games could take a stab at it. And Unity succeded which is great, I love them for it
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  42. hippocoder

    hippocoder

    Digital Ape Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2010
    Posts:
    26,073
    Look I've given out the warnings that unity is due to fall behind quickly from this point. As we speak UDK is cleaning up their toolchain. Soon there's c# support in UDK so you can script the entire game without touching a compiler.

    Sounds like unity. So instead of berating what UDK is not good at and defending unity, you should be encouraging unity to up the ante in their mobile development.

    Sometimes that is just giving us out of the box effects and shaders and tweaks to make it EASY for EVERYONE to make titles that push the engine on ipad2, ipad3, 4S and the new droids coming out :)

    All I want is the best for our chosen toolset, which is Unity. There are things UDK does much better in terms of engine or more importantly - engine support with shaders that ship.

    UDK can do that now though. Do you really think the future is keeping unity small for small teams? It's about attracting larger teams AWAY from UDK. It is about competing to stay in business.

    Unity made the decision to go large or go home last year and court bigger teams. Bigger teams are moving to mobile. They never worry about if UDK is harder or easier. They worry about top quality visuals, always. It is always visuals. Go figure.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  43. Starsman Games

    Starsman Games

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2011
    Posts:
    2,152
    If the Unity team needs my warning to stay up to date, then it may be a good thing to stay quiet and let them fall behind.

    If UDK ever becomes an environment I rather develop with despite its business model, then I will just do that. I don't work for Unity nor do I have family there. It's their responsibility to stay on their toes, not me to warn them.

    That said, we don't know much but we do know 4.0 is coming and I'm sure they have some big stuff queued up for it. May it be enough to stay viable for you? Only you can tell that once the time comes. For the time being, this is the hammer in my hand and I'll finish building this new kitchen. I may pick a new hammer once I'm done with the kitchen, if I find one that works better than this one.
     
  44. hippocoder

    hippocoder

    Digital Ape Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2010
    Posts:
    26,073
    I guess you hit the nail on the head :)
     
  45. kerters

    kerters

    Joined:
    May 13, 2011
    Posts:
    164
    Haha,
    No, all they need to do now is to give us realtime tessellated Dx11 terrain with a nice tool set and optimized texture streaming ;-)
     
  46. Starsman Games

    Starsman Games

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2011
    Posts:
    2,152
    I just would love to have smaller scene files :p
     
  47. Swearsoft

    Swearsoft

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Posts:
    1,621
    Unreal is an engine that showed it's first game in 1998 and you are comparing it's status to Unity. Seriously?

    Anyway we have talked about this before, you can search and find the reasons Unreal (UDK) is so popular and it has nothing to do with Unity, Unity wasn't even around when Unreal had already dominated the market as the go-to game engine for studios with AAA budgets.

    The editor, bundled with the game is what created the modding scene, that became and indie scene only after Unity came out for PC. If there was no Unity, there would be no reason for Unreal to open it's gates, there would be no fear of losing aspiring game developers (coders, artists), of course if not Unity somebody else would have done this.

    Unreal is a de-facto industry standard, no one is saying it isn't, but realistically the main reason it is in this place has more to do with business and business decision, than it has to do with the actual tool. Not to say it doesn't have amazing features, of course it does, it's the top engine, used for the top titles, but it's not the only solution and it's not the easiest to work with. It isn't even the most graphically advanced in my eyes.

    Let's see what Unity has lined up for us for GDC, rendering is not always the end game and a company from Germany is actually better at it (Crytek).

    Hippo says they always focus on the visuals, they do, that's what is easy to sell (images) and easier to achieve than actual innovation in gameplay for instance. I too am a visual slut, but developing a title with high quality visuals (Crysis, Unreal level) was never on my agenda for mobile, only for desktop, not because it can't be done, but because I am not a mazochist.
     
  48. Morning

    Morning

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2012
    Posts:
    1,141
    The speed and ease of use of unity has spoiled me so much. The automatic compiler is so handy. The way you can tweak one line of code and check it right away is just a godsend imo. But udk is much nicer if you're an artist and just want to make a good looking scenery. At that kind of workflow udk is better I think.
    To each his own. I wonder what unity 4 will bring to the table.
     
  49. BrUnO-XaVIeR

    BrUnO-XaVIeR

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Posts:
    1,687
    I have to say... I'm considering not to support Unity anymore (at the moment I am sure I wont buy Unity 4) and build future projects in UDK.
    There are BIG steps Epic is jumping in this run and Unity is loosing, being left behind more and more.
     
  50. Morning

    Morning

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2012
    Posts:
    1,141
    Care to elaborate?