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How to start Unity if you already know programming?

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by unity_uKEW3_3oLVGDSw, May 23, 2019.

  1. unity_uKEW3_3oLVGDSw

    unity_uKEW3_3oLVGDSw

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    May 23, 2019
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    1
    Hello,
    I just picked up Unity fee days ago and finished some basic tutorials and stuff.
    My problem is that all the longer tutorials that I pickup usually focus on the programming aspects, assuming that the viewer is not comfortable with programming.
    I have been programming for 6+ years now and am pretty proficient with C# and Java.
    Do you know of a tutorial that focuses on Unity without the programming? Also, what projects do you recommend me to do?
     
  2. halley

    halley

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    Aug 26, 2013
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    The architecture of Unity is a bit different from most C# or other OOP applications. There is a lot of magic going on within the main game loop, often via reflection and serialization, which any other app would tend to avoid. But it works. Learning the main loop and the component (monobehaviour) system will help you make code "the Unity way" rather than fight the architecture.

    Grab some of the example projects and pretend to debug something. Say, find out exactly where in the code something happens, like managing a certain character/prop interaction.

    Then mock up a new scene in the example project to get a feel for how the construction/design process works.
     
  3. Siegewolf

    Siegewolf

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    Jun 15, 2018
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    Well being so proficient in programming, you sure covered a major part of equation :)

    Regarding tutorials, those I watched always explained the Unity along side the code. This is nice line of tutorial episodes, if not a bit old:



    Perhaps a good idea is that after you get a feel on editor itself, you search tutorials for various aspects by their names, such as "mecanim" system.

    As for the type of project... a good suggestion is that you start with something simple. A project that you are sure you will finish :)
     
    JoeStrout likes this.
  4. DaDonik

    DaDonik

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    halley and Siegewolf like this.
  5. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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  6. Joe-Censored

    Joe-Censored

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    I'd start by skipping tutorials and instead go through the Unity manual familiarizing yourself with what functionality is generally built into Unity. Then I'd dive into a simple project to get practice using GameObjects, adding components, playing with physics, some simple UI windows, etc. The project doesn't have to be an actual game, just something to play with many of the engine's features. Like dropping blocks from the sky, or firing a cannon at different angles.

    After you're happy with your progress, then jump into a fairly simple actual game project. Something on the scale of an atari game clone, nothing too expansive.