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how to make decent money with unity

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by dreal, Apr 11, 2012.

  1. dreal

    dreal

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    Hi,
    I am trying to keep my drive to keep making games, but I don't see a way for a Indie developer to make a decent amount of money submitting games to these web portals. Can someone point out were I can post a web game
    and make a good amount of money? Everything so far I dealt with was ad revenue, and that ain't going to pay any bills!
    Then there's sponsoring ,which flash basically runs things.
     
    Ume786 likes this.
  2. Starsman Games

    Starsman Games

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    You wont be making money with web.

    If you took advantage of the free Android export, and happen to have an Android device to test with, you may have some luck publishing to the Android Market.

    Other than that, there is the Apple Mac Appstore (you will need a mac and at least $100 to get started selling in their store). By the end of the year Windows 8 shoudl be here with a PC equivalent.
     
  3. Eric5h5

    Eric5h5

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    I doubt it's possible. Make iOS, Steam (if you get lucky), Mac App Store, and Android games instead.

    --Eric
     
  4. JamesLeeNZ

    JamesLeeNZ

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    Only way I could see you making money is if you have consumables ppl can purchase.
     
  5. GiusCo

    GiusCo

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    best way is to hone your main skill and then trade as a freelance
     
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  6. keithsoulasa

    keithsoulasa

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    +1
     
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  7. sybixsus2

    sybixsus2

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    A lot of corporations and some smaller companies want web games built for promotional purposes. They don't want to monetize the games because the games are purely to promote their existing brands and products. Of course, in order to land those contracts, you'll need a good portfolio of web games and getting a few smaller jobs under your belt so you can present a resume/cv would also be very handy.
     
  8. Swearsoft

    Swearsoft

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    yes, at least for the shor term, at some point it does get tiring and trying to get your own money making projects out there is a must. If you can "do without" now (no commitments), hone your skills by making some of your own projects, once you have commitments it's a lot more difficult to put time aside for your own projects.
     
  9. Aiursrage2k

    Aiursrage2k

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    Do you go looking for those type of contracts or would they simply come to you?


    Anyway I think the best bet is to make a game for all platforms. Windows (Desura -- unless you can get on steam), mac, iphone, droid and windows8 (next year?) and some ad money from web, not just targeting one platform.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2012
  10. Gigiwoo

    Gigiwoo

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    Life is what you make of it! Wake up everyday and find ways to improve yourself. Build habits that lead to continual growth. Read lots of books - game design, psychology, leadership, business. Do Deliberate Practice in any area you want to be good at. Keep doing it.

    Life does not come to you - you go for it!

    Gigi.
     
  11. tatoforever

    tatoforever

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    Make a decent game first and port it to all Unity platforms. Make a decent advertize and you'll then make decent money. :D
     
  12. sybixsus2

    sybixsus2

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    You should go looking for them, but probably not directly. (Emailing companies at random without knowing who's hiring and who to contact is a pretty scattergun approach and while unlikely to do you any harm, it's unlikely to gain you anything either.) Network, build relationships, make contacts, and generally do everything you can to improve your chances of knowing where a vacancy might crop up and when. More generally, push your CV/resume around, let people see your work, and if you have a website, work to attract casual visitors - you never know when someone who knows someone who knows someone whose sister stumbled across your site a few days ago might end up asking you for a quote. Serendipity happens more than you think, but it only happens to people who gave themselves as many opportunities as possible.
     
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  13. huxley

    huxley

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    The more games that you release the greater chance that someone will see your work and try to contact you to work on something. If you have the patience and the skill, try to maintain a high quality level, rather than releasing a myriad of clones just to fill up you game library. In the end, this is what will make you stand out and you'll get higher quality contracts.
    As far as your own games, I agree with the other comments. iOS is still the top dog, and will be for some time, but we still make sales in Android and Amazon. When you have to do promotions and other awareness campaigns, it's best to have a version of your game on all platforms for maximize exposure for anyone that reads about your release.
     
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  14. user1j3di3j2sa3

    user1j3di3j2sa3

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    yep that's what i think
     
  15. HonoraryBob

    HonoraryBob

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    What about the Facebook app method - post periodic notices to players' friends' "feeds" in order to attract more people to the game, and charge a small amount for certain in-game items. Farmtown (the inspiration for Farmville) quickly went viral that way without even trying (they were still in beta-testing) and gained something like 18 million players in just a few months. Then Zynga made a clone that gained about 80 million players at its height.
     
  16. imaginaryhuman

    imaginaryhuman

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    Another option is to go for the casual games market and do something for the likes of Big Fish Games, they seem to be seeing a lot of growth still. Alternatively iOS seems to be popular with most people here, ie better than Android, but it's a somewhat tuff market now. Also remember standard Windows and Mac desktop games can still sell well if they're good and especially if they have broad/casual appeal.
     
  17. goat

    goat

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    You best chance would be to attend a university in a state with a pool of grant money they award yearly for university student 'startups'. Almost every state, province, canton, even many counties and townships, have such pools of grant money if they have a university or college in their jurisdiction.

    You'll at least get somewhat better visibility for your games but then you'll be stuck paying off university loans.
     
  18. hippocoder

    hippocoder

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    It's not Unity that will make your money for you. Unity is an excellent tool you can use to make some money for you. You will make money for you. If something is not working, then you need to have your head screwed on right, spot what works and what doesn't. Even if you do what works, you're still going to need luck on your side.
     
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  19. nipoco

    nipoco

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    Couldn't agree more
     
  20. oysterCAKE

    oysterCAKE

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    Following from some extensive research that I've done, I can reveal that the best way to make money from Unity is by making a really good game.
    Failing that, you can also make money from Unity by working for them.




    .
    .
    .:D
     
  21. HonoraryBob

    HonoraryBob

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    No one had any comment on my suggestion of using the Facebook app method? It seems to have worked extremely well for some games, although I suppose it's a saturated market by now. But most of these Facebook apps are of very low quality or have very little gameplay (mostly just cookie-cutter casual games that are extremely simple), so I think an original game that's nicely done and reasonably polished (especially if it's 3D) could do pretty well there.
    And maybe if enough of us asked Facebook to finally add built-in Unity support (so you don't need to do it as an app with an iframe that connects to your own website) perhaps they would add that feature and we could host Unity games directly on Facebook's own servers. That would greatly reduce the financial risk since there wouldn't be bandwidth problems to worry about.
     
  22. HamadSayed

    HamadSayed

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    You can make a game and publish it to this website!
    http://gamejolt.com
    you get an amount of money but dunno if you get that huge amount!
     
  23. Master-Frog

    Master-Frog

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    Learn how to make games now in this gold rush culture, and keep doing it long after everybody else loses steam and gives up. Then you will make money later.
     
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  24. hippocoder

    hippocoder

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    Protip: finish something.
     
  25. N1warhead

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    I got an idea - don't search for 2 year old threads or even bother wasting your time to answer a 2 year old thread - well sense it was last answered.

    You could have typed in lines of code working on your master piece instead lol.
     
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  26. Kiwasi

    Kiwasi

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    Gold rush culture means that there are plenty of people wanting to buy shovels.
     
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  27. Master-Frog

    Master-Frog

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    If I wanted to be a shovel maker, I would have just done that. Look, if you're making games to get rich in 2015, you need your head examined. Either do it for fun or walk away. Maybe the market will change in a few years or maybe you will make something people want. But it's all a big, fat maybe. Big time companies have already calculated all the major markets and are currently spending more money per day than you pay a month in rent keeping you out of their territory. Face it. Indie means small, small means relatively disadvantaged and unlikely to find major success. Embrace the underdog nature of what you are or just quit, because being an indie to get rich makes as much sense as starting a band with hopes of stardom. The real world works through producers, promoters, advertisers, etc. You can't do it from your basement unless "it" involves finding a publisher to pick up your project and giving them a great deal of your profits in return. It is BUSINESS. Therefore, the rules of business apply. If you really want to increase your odds, call publishers and see if you can actually get in touch with a human. Good luck.
     
  28. Kiwasi

    Kiwasi

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    The thread title is how to make money with Unity. Not how to make money making games. For many small entities selling tools on the asset store, writing tutorials, and straight out work for bigger studios is a better way to make money then simply publishing games.
     
  29. Master-Frog

    Master-Frog

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    Sure, and I believe that the top assets make $30k/mo or something like that, and a lot of people make very little. Even the shovel making business is pretty jam-packed.
     
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  30. Kiwasi

    Kiwasi

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    Very true. The next big winner will be shovels for the shovel makers. ;)
     
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  31. zombiegorilla

    zombiegorilla

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    Work for a rodent.
     
  32. zombiegorilla

    zombiegorilla

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    Are you sure it is that much? I know it has grown, but I believe that dev of nGUI was making just under 30ish a month at the top of its popularity, I don't think that was all from the asset store. I would be surprised if there were any current assets at that level, but I really don't know.
     
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  33. Master-Frog

    Master-Frog

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    I'll let you in on a little secret that I figured out a long time ago, most of the people buying indie games are aspiring indie game developers. we are our own target demographic. we are influencing our own purchasing habits. we are trying to read into trends in the market that we are creating as a group. that's why it's so hard to figure out
     
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  34. hippocoder

    hippocoder

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    I'll let you in on a little secret: that's not true.

    1. get the total number of people buying indie games
    2. get the total number of people using ue4 and unity

    Guess what? massive difference. Your theory can't make sense no matter how liberally you want to skew stats. The immutable fact is that indies make up the smallest demographic purchasing indie games. It's probably all indies, but that number is so tiny in relation to how many people buy indie games that it's ridiculous. I mean lets face it if notch sold 10 million copies and there are only 3 million active indie developers*, this means that one indie game alone has a far vaster audience than all game developers combined.

    That's just one reason the theory is wrong, I can't be bothered with the rest.



    *For sake of argument.
     
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  35. Master-Frog

    Master-Frog

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    all you have to do is look at how many people want to make games. at some point you're going to end up on unity or unreal or some other engines community, you're going to see the types of games that independent developers have created you're going to be curious about them you're going to start playing them and you're going to treat it as though it's research for developing your own game.
     
  36. hippocoder

    hippocoder

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    Even if it's all the curious hobbyists, it can't beat how many people are actually purchasing games. Some indie games are just bought by too many ordinary people.

    The reason indie will always thrive and change is because generally, the games are all high risk. This means normal people delight in indie titles quite often, from the silly to the macabre.
     
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  37. Master-Frog

    Master-Frog

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    maybe you underestimate just how many people want to make games these days.

    I will put the percentage of males under 30 who want to make games at about 95%, even if they just think about it and don't actually do any coding or art or anything.

    think about how much feedback on games is framed in terms of game design, and how many people watch extra credits and go to game design and development schools.

    and as many people is that is still more are interested
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2015
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  38. tedthebug

    tedthebug

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    I put up 5 prototypes on game jolt, 1 last Thursday, 3 last Friday, & 1 on Sunday. I did them as under development but set it up wrong & published them. So far they've totalled about 200 plays which is 190 more than I expected & I've made (to the amusement of my family) $0.12 from ad revenue share. At least one of them has someone following it & 2 people keep playing it each day which has spurred me to find an artist & programmer to help take it further & to find a way to use the game jolt api to set up competitive high scores to try & get people to keep playing it.

    For the OP, the most popular one has only 1 mechanic, 2 buttons, games last 2-16 seconds with the average somewhere around 5 seconds, & took me around 2hrs to make, test & upload it. The slightly more complicated ones have had 10-60% of the plays as the 'successful' one & took weeks each. So, all I'd say is keep it really simple, be brave & post it up with an explanation in the description saying it is a prototype to help lower expectations.

    Edit: I also posted the links into the most recent Friday feedback so I can get feedback from the other designers on here.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2015
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  39. GarBenjamin

    GarBenjamin

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    I can see that a large number of Indie game buyers may very well be Indie Game Devs or more likely people who want to be Indie Game Devs. The ones who dream about making games, piddle around (with Unity, UE4, GMS, Construct 2 and the dozens of other popular game development tools), dream of making money and so forth. I do think a lot of the actual active Indie Game Devs are buying Indie games too. Some would do it just to support fellow Indie Game Devs. Others will do it for "research". Others maybe because they actually like the games. lol

    Unity said a month or so ago it had reached 4 million registered users. Not sure how many UE4 has. Or GMS. I know some of the "smaller" game dev kits out there show they have hundreds of thousands of users. I'd think GMS must have a lot of people who have registered (whether actively developing or not). There may well be 10 million... maybe 50 million or 100 million people who could be considered potential Indie Game Developers. As far as I know that is enough to easily cover the sales of any Indie game. I do think people sometimes don't realize just how many different Game Dev tools are out there. Unity probably has the most users when compared one-to-one of any game dev kit but it certainly does not represent all of the hobbyists / IGDs / wanna be IGDs. There are loads of people making games in Flash still, HTML5 (I mean from scratch), GMS and so on. I made a list once earlier in the year and found dozens of popular "kits" people were using. Some had maybe 50,000 users, others had 700,000 users. Others such as GMS did not list the number but I am thinking GMS probably has millions registered.

    Of course, I do think other pure gamer people are actually buying Indie games too. I just think it is a reasonable idea that Indie Game Devs and Wanna Be Indie Game Devs may very well represent a huge percentage of the market for Indie Games. Nothing wrong with that though. Actually it is reasonable and should be that way in my opinion anyway. If people are making & selling games (or wanna be doing it) they expect others to buy it seems only reasonable they should in turn support other Indie Game Developers and buy their games.
     
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  40. angrypenguin

    angrypenguin

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    Yeah, well, I want to be a world famous rally driver. Do you think that Ford and Holden thus consider me to be a race driver?

    Plenty of people "want" to make games. Relatively few of them want it enough to give it a shot. Relatively few of those want it enough to stick with it. Nothing wrong with any of that, but treating all of those people as if they're the same is counter-productive.
     
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  41. Master-Frog

    Master-Frog

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    They're not the same. But I have had too many "okay, what if there was a game where..." conversations with people who, to be fair, don't know what programming is to ignore the fact that lots and lots of people from all different backgrounds dream of making games. I think these same people choose to support games that they like, but also games they feel like they could probably make themselves (if they really tried, of course). So even if someone "made a really cool game in RPGMaker one time" they kind of feel like they are also an indie game developer. And if someone has a dream for a game, they kind of feel like they are an indie developer too. So, that's what it is like out there.
     
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  42. hippocoder

    hippocoder

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    I confess I want to be a bit of everything. It's not going to make sense going that far, that people "want" to be game developers. Cos I'll come back and say that 100x more people "want" to be gamers. After all they're being born many times a second.

    I think the general confusion here is that gamers actually have a passing interest in you know, games. They love games. They want to know more. Film buffs love films. They want to know more.

    For the sake of sanity it's best to look at what it's like right now - actual developers who are capable of creating an exe that's actually playable. That's development. And a gamer is someone who has purchased a game.
     
  43. angrypenguin

    angrypenguin

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    Supposing, for discussion's sake, that this is true... of what use could that piece of information possibly be in this context?

    Rather than identifying a group and learning about them, which can help us to make useful decisions, you've instead identified a group of people and then made it so vague that it doesn't actually identify anybody, and is therefore a useless distinction.

    The labels are irrelevant. The fact that there is a large overlap does not change the fact that there is also a clear distinction between the group of people who play (indie) games and the group of people who make games. And if you want to make a game that people might actually buy then you'd best figure out your target audience rather than spend ages talking about the label you put on them.
     
  44. AcidArrow

    AcidArrow

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    Make a decent* game and promote it decently*.

    *definitions vary
     
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  45. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    Until they learn the truth from us that they're simply some random person with an idea. :p
     
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  46. Master-Frog

    Master-Frog

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    The usefulness is limited to this: at least some people (enough to matter) who like indie games like indie games because they're in the realm of possibility for an indie to make. These people like to feel like they could jump on a computer and make this game, themselves. There are gamers with no interest in making independent games, they play Assassin's Creed sequels and watch Ridiculousness. They don't all spend hours looking for delightful, yet quirky indie titles in between calling people names in COD and liking pictures of cute girls on Facebook. It is a certain type of person who likes indie games.
     
  47. imaginaryhuman

    imaginaryhuman

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    Agreed with Hippo... there are far more game players than developers and always will be.
     
  48. dogzerx2

    dogzerx2

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    There are so many obstacles it's crazy.

    Just making people click on your game icon is a challenge in itself. You need exposure and hope people don't scroll past your icon before it's pushed out of the picture by the constant stampede of new games.

    And as hard as that is, it's nothing compared to actually having customer purchase your game. So far your actual game doesn't even matter. What matters is that your game looks promising and it's something customer would like.

    Only then, you can only hope the few people who purchased, don't refund. And we're talking about possibly a few dollars profit for the first year(s) of work. So you're not even past half this horrible odds minefield, you can't stop now if you want to make a living.

    Your only hope at this point is that your game was good enough so SOME of your buyers remember you, so then... they may or may not buy your next game right off the bat...sales at launch make your game icon survive a little longer, improving your odds. But needless to say your game really needs to be good for this.
    Put yourself in the customer's shoes here, how many games can someone remember, let alone give a cr*p? Most customers probably spent 100s of dollars already, in clones they've grown tired of, probably regret most of those purchases. So customer doesn't owe you anything, you owe him a good product. You need to redeem him for all the bad vaporware he paid for, before he loses all trust. Cherish any trust he places upon you. lol.

    So this looks like very bad odds... like a silly hope to win the lottery. The comfort I find is that this is not a lottery... you can play the lottery 1000 times, your odds are still the same. But this is something where you can improve your odds over time, by gaining knowledge about marketing and improving skills.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2015
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  49. hippocoder

    hippocoder

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    Yeah but that's just cod players. You've got cod players who aren't halo players. Halo players who aren't WoW players. Some games attract diehard fans. Most gamers will be playing a wide variety. If they were not then we would not really be invited to develop on consoles, no.

    Indie is a mainstream category. It after all represents nearly all mobile game sales.
     
  50. Teo

    Teo

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    Interesting guys how you assume devs are not gamers :(
     
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