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How much money do you earn from your games?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by KaOzz, Oct 2, 2014.

  1. Antony-Blackett

    Antony-Blackett

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    Major Mayhem 2 just passed $200k revenue.

    Just to clarify, I don’t count this as paying dev costs back yet still $150k to go but it should get there.

    2 years dev, 2 full time developers. A couple contractors for a month or two. And the usual company expenses and software licensing overheads.
     
  2. one_one

    one_one

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    4 - Marketing
    5 - Company related fees (setting up the company, accounting...)
    6 - VAT/sales tax, where applicable
    7 - Corporate tax
    8 - Income tax
    9 - Rent, food, heating, electricity etc.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2018
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  3. SamohtVII

    SamohtVII

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  4. Lurking-Ninja

    Lurking-Ninja

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  5. Kiwasi

    Kiwasi

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  6. Antony-Blackett

    Antony-Blackett

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    If they paid you out earlier, your bank would likely charge you a transaction fee of $15 and you'd be losing money!
     
  7. ThunderSoul

    ThunderSoul

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  8. GarBenjamin

    GarBenjamin

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    Congrats! It didn't cost $0 to create unless you are financially free and this is all done completely for fun (in which case you probably wouldn't be checking earnings so often). It took the most valuable thing any of us have... TIME.

    Just mentioning that if you are looking at this as wanting to be an Indie having an Indie game dev business then TIME is critical. Time to a large extent determines profitability. For example even at 1 cents... if you were fast enough if everything could respond fast enough you could build a great business. I mean you'd have ti be super fast... The Flash.

    Of course that is way beyond what we can achieve and how fast things respond so is impossible. But still it illustrates how important time is in profitability. Ultimately a successful business is simply being able to make more money than the cost of good & cost of time that you invest so key is maximize income while minimizing investment. Well as much as possible to get to that magical point where they balance out and then move into profit.

    Another ramble. Enjoy and good luck! :)
     
  9. Quingu

    Quingu

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    Yeah, time... The problem is that in game dev EVERYTHING takes so much time... A lot of it. Anybody who released a full game to the market knows this. It's also not an easy time. You need the skills, the brains, you need to be creative and persistent... often for years.
     
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  10. Lajo

    Lajo

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    This is a tough business but has some good moments. My friend just got $150,000 for his first month from a casual game that took him 2 wks to make. Now that game is bumping up some of his other games
     
  11. Quingu

    Quingu

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    I don't believe that. Give the name of that game. Is it mobile?
     
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  12. GarBenjamin

    GarBenjamin

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    It's happened before and will happen again just that it is basically out of our control. This is what makes it all seem so random in a way. Because in many ways it is. One person can truly labor and put a hell of a lot of effort into making a game and it does "okay" (or even worse) and someone else can knock out Flappy Bird or some tiny abstract style simple game in a week and the stars align, the right person stumbles upon it at the right time, maybe it gets featured, someone covers it and that starts a snowball effect where others cover it simply because someone else with "clout" covered it.

    Would be interesting to see it I agree.
     
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  13. Antony-Blackett

    Antony-Blackett

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    That’s exactly it. It’s hard to be consistent in this industry. It’s hard for ever game you ever release to do well.

    That’s why it’s better to not invest too much before a concept is proven to not only be fun but also create value.
     
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  14. justanobody

    justanobody

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    I'm happy for your friend. I know of another game or two that was 72 hours of development time that ended up selling hundreds of thousands of copies at $0.5 - $1 a piece. That guy makes "quality shovelware" on Steam that people seem to enjoy and since he has a foothold from the first giant success, the other games after that seem to sell stronger. Steam pushes the old game and the old game pushes the new game.

    On the other hand, I see game jam games that get super popular, hundreds of thousands of downloads that don't affect their other games at all. Who can tell me one of the other 26 games made by Hotline Miami's dev? Maybe one of the other 30+ games made by the devs who made Angry Birds? I guess a 1% overflow from the famous game to the lesser games still counts.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2018
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  15. Antypodish

    Antypodish

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    I always look at this from following point.

    How long (how many years) took to get to the point, of getting "your" hit. How much you get of it, and how much you earned to day, from previous work.

    Just an abstract example.
    If for example full time commitment of 10 years take to get 100k from first hit, and over past 10 years earning is just minimum wage from that ongoing work, where that really puts you? Maybe is a hit, but is it a really success?
    Probably would be better off anyway, doing any other kind of job.
    Chances you get another hit like that soon?
    Also, need to take into consideration dev expenses etc.
     
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  16. justanobody

    justanobody

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    Time for the monthly report!

    + $0 for the $10 game at full price.
    + $1 for for the $1 game at full price.
    + $0 in market transactions for the $10 game with 3 transactions.
    + $0 in market transactions for the $1 game with 20 transactions at $0.03 a piece.
    ======================
    + $1 income (which is surprising)
    - $50 from owning a company
    ======================
    - $50 lost

    Not much to say this month. The next month I should have a report on that game #3 I made with a friend that he gave me last month. I chose not to update the game in any way. One of those "not broke, don't fix it."
     
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  17. QFSW

    QFSW

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    + $43 on Subsideria
    + $3 on Subsideria OST
    ====================

    October has been rather dead (1 sale in the whole month) so it seems like the game is getting ready to go to sleep for good. I'm not too confident it will ever even break even, but I can hope
     
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  18. GarBenjamin

    GarBenjamin

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    In fairness though you didn't seem to be marketing it this month. A few days ago I found one of your tweets from end of last month & retweeted it but that isn't going to do much on its own. Of course you could have been marketing elsewhere. :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2018
  19. QFSW

    QFSW

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    Yeah you're right, but I think I've just felt completely burnt out. After working on it and marketing so hard and seeing nothing came out of it, I've lost the drive to carry on (although I know I SHOULD market it more again)
     
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  20. akimashi

    akimashi

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    between $3.50 to $24 dollars a month for two years now. Off a one tiny prop asset set. :) Hopely to get another prop set out so i can double my monthly revenue haha.
     
  21. QFSW

    QFSW

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    But that's not from games then?
     
  22. angrypenguin

    angrypenguin

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    What makes you say that?

    Edit: I realise that a prop isn't a game. Personally, there's a lot of opportunity in the whole dev pipeline, not just the step at the end where you sell a thing to a consumer, and as far as I'm concerned it all counts.
     
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  23. Kiwasi

    Kiwasi

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    Agreed. Most of my 'games' income comes from freelancing and YouTube. None of which is directly selling games. But its still games income.
     
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  24. QFSW

    QFSW

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    I just got the impression here that people wanted to know how much others made specifically from games, but maybe I was wrong. That's why I just shared my game income and not asset income
     
  25. yoonitee

    yoonitee

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    "It is better to work in a sandwich shop and make games for fun
    than work full time on games you hate just to chase after riches"
    - Yonitee 2018.​
     
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  26. BIGTIMEMASTER

    BIGTIMEMASTER

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    "It's best to make games you love and get rich doing that."

    - my dog
     
  27. Tom_Veg

    Tom_Veg

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    "It is best to be born in rich family and inherit wealth so you can spend your time how ever you want".

    Confucius
     
  28. Rajmahal

    Rajmahal

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    This year has been good for me. Will just break $100,000 usd across steam, iOS and android. I'm hoping to launch my 4th game on mobile next month and launch two games in 2019. Will see how it goes.

    Agree that this is not an easy business at all and getting even to this level has been 5 years of very hard work.
     
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  29. SamohtVII

    SamohtVII

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    Yeah it's been a good 3 months. All that hard work paying off.

    Boom! Compare your lives to mine and then kill yourselves.
    upload_2019-1-14_17-17-41.png
     
  30. Antypodish

    Antypodish

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    Now you grab that green percentage, plot on grab and promote a game, on how much you game gained past period. Just don't mention actual $ ;)
     
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  31. AndersMalmgren

    AndersMalmgren

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    haha, and I thought our numbers were bad. At least I can use our money to buy assets etc :D
     
  32. toto2003

    toto2003

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    It s huuuuge! You grow more than 3000%! Congrat dude
     
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  33. jtok4j

    jtok4j

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  34. nobluff67

    nobluff67

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    As I celebrate the imminent release of my latest game, here are my stats for the previous 2 games (started about June 2017):

    App 1: Word Assassin (2017) - WordGame - (Heyzap Ad Mediation), 244 impressions $3.63
    App 2: Word Brain Busters (2018) - WordGame - (Heyzap Ad Mediation), 34 impressions $0.77

    App 2: Word Brain Busters (2018) - WordGame - (Appodeal Ad Mediation), 29 impressions $0.15

    App 3: Eggsanity - Action Game - (UnityAds), ...... (released within a week.)
     
  35. Fraktalia

    Fraktalia

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    Just my little story with my college project "Endless Dream" check this link for more information. It was back in the days when you had to pass Steam Greenlight in order to publish. We even made it through greenlit, but 2 months later Greenlight was removed and the flooding began

    After release, the game made a revenue of a whooping 140$ over 1 year which was never paid out for some reason and the account got hacked -,-. RL sucks
     
  36. NunoDinisSantos

    NunoDinisSantos

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    Right now I'm maybe in -145€. To be fair, I invested most of it in Unity courses and store assets (I'm a terrible artist). I enjoy making mobile games and already released two on google play.

    My first game Poke It made me 5€ in two years
    My most recent game Speed Void made me a big round zero €.

    I'm currently working on another game but my hopes of making any kind of money are very down. I still search for many topics about indie developpers making any kind of monthly revenue to gain a little motivation, but deep down I know that the chances of that happening are very slim. Don't get me wrong, money is not the first reason I make mobile games, but I think we all would like to get some money from it.

    EDIT: My biggest problem is that I get no installs (saturated market I guess). Anyone here tried using ads as marketing ? If so, was it worth it ? Thanks