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How do you guys manage the assets you've bought?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by fengkan, May 11, 2019.

  1. fengkan

    fengkan

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2018
    Posts:
    12
    So that you can find what you need easily.

    I am thinking of saving some screenshots for each one in my Evernote, but it seems to need lots of work,
    so I am wondering whether there is a standard way or software to deal with it. Thank you.
     
  2. Antypodish

    Antypodish

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    Apr 29, 2014
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    4,564
    Moat likely there is. But I don't use personally many of purchased assets. Mainly making my own, with few exceptions. So is no big deal for me.

    But you could easily manage your assets in excel spreadsheet. Make search filters and screenshot as you like and hyper links.

    However, almost anything you will do in game dev, is lots of work. Unity Editor itself is big shortcut. Assets used wisely can be shortcut too. Or path to the doom. Specially when become obsolete and without source files.
     
  3. Socrates

    Socrates

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    Mar 29, 2011
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    657
    First, I save the web page from the Asset Store. After having assets depreciated, I've realized that info is not always going to be there. I very rarely update the web page; only if I know that an asset has gone through a massive change.

    Second, for certain types of assets where watching a visual is important, I save the YouTube video from the Asset Store page. Same reason as above.

    Third, I have a spreadsheet that lists every asset I've ever bought or downloaded for free. There's info on what category and subcategory everything is in, so I can just sort by those columns to find stuff I'm looking for. I also keep notes in that spreadsheet about the asset.

    Fourth, I use a little utility I wrote so I can generate the full hard drive path to the assets, which I store in that spreadsheet. This means I never have to use my list of assets on editor's version of the Asset Store to load stuff, because it's such a pain to use.

    Fifth, for some assets, I've written up more notes in a Word document or other file, sometimes with screenshots. This is more for notes about how to use an asset so that I don't have to go back and learn them again later.

    It sounds like a lot, but it really only takes me a few minutes for every new asset and it makes a huge difference in finding stuff. It also lets me keep track of all the assets I've found to be decent versus the ones that I've marked as garbage.
     
  4. Billy4184

    Billy4184

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    Jul 7, 2014
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    4,402
    I download a lot of stuff like sound effects, music and HDRI maps into a folder on my desktop called 'AssetBin', because using the in-editor asset store tab is really annoying, and the download fills up my project with all sorts when what I want is only a small part of it.
     
  5. Murgilod

    Murgilod

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    Nov 12, 2013
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    5,405
    Same, but in a custom windows library folder called "assets," followed by several sorted categories. The only time I use the asset store itself is when there's an update.
     
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  6. AndersMalmgren

    AndersMalmgren

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    I did version the folder that the assets are downloaded to using git, but I stopped. You can stil download deprecated assets from the store if you have bought it. Only upside of using git is the versioning of old versions.
     
  7. Murgilod

    Murgilod

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    That's a pretty big upside, considering how asset updates can come with regressions and Unity still doesn't offer the option to download previous versions. It also helps if there are compatibility issues between asset versions and Unity versions.
     
  8. snacktime

    snacktime

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    Apr 15, 2013
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    2,160
    Code assets I put in our VCS, lightweight enough and if an update screws something up it's the simplest way to revert.

    Non code assets I tend to have in a separate project and pull in just what I need. Usually I only need a few pieces, plus prefabs have a significant impact on the time to reload code changes, it actually dwarfs the compilation time itself on larger projects due to all the scanning it has to do.
     
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  9. AndersMalmgren

    AndersMalmgren

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    True, but in the actual game git repo you also have it, and if you download that revison the game in that revision also syncs to that version of the asset.
     
  10. Murgilod

    Murgilod

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    There are numerous edge cases that can pop up that aren't covered by that and running a git repo for a pile of asset files is not a particularly daunting or expensive task.
     
  11. AndersMalmgren

    AndersMalmgren

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    Of all of the above solutions my git solution is off course the best, totally agree :D