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How do you guys get 3D models?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Quist, Mar 2, 2016.

  1. Quist

    Quist

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    Hey Guys!

    My name is Quist and i´ve been here in Unity3D for around 1,5 years and this is where i started playing with coding and game development.

    So after i´ve practiced my scripting skills a lot im starting to lack 3D models to hold my scripts!
    So my question is: How do you guys get models to your games?
    - I use Unity Asset Store but its very limited and hard to mix the assets.

    Also I dont want to be an artist so i have never bothered with Blender or such programs.

    So what do you guys suggest me to do to get some 3D models?
    - Use my time to learn how to create them myself?
    - Or what do you guys think / do? :)
     
  2. neginfinity

    neginfinity

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    You can

    1. Learn to model (blender is free)
    2. Pay people to make models for you.
    3. Collaborate with others (non-commercial, most likely)
    4. Buy models from many online shops.
    5. Switch to simpler visual style where you can still create the art yourself.
    6. Download and use whatever can be found for free on sites like blendswap.
     
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  3. drewradley

    drewradley

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    You forgot procedural mesh geometry inside Unity.
     
  4. Quist

    Quist

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    I´ve thought about collaborating, but the Unity forum seems like a sausage party, where the coders are the sausage.. Am i wrong in my observation or how difficult do you guys find it for a beginner - medium coder to find a collaboration?
     
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  5. Lee7

    Lee7

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    IMO, if you dont want to to an artist, dont even try. Its VERY time consuming to make quality work, plus you need to have a natural talent as well.

    Your time is much better doing what you do best and what you actually know how to do. Use the asset store and other sites like turbosquid when you can. Or try to find someone with similar interests in making a game like you want to make and team up.
     
  6. neginfinity

    neginfinity

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    -_-

    Yes, procedural geometry can be used, but for majority of cases it is not worth mentioning or even considering.

    Go ahead and make a realistic procedural knight with sword, textures and pbr materials. I'll wait.
     
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  7. Quist

    Quist

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    Thanks man!
    I will try and look for an artist for my next project then :)
    - Right now i´ve designed my games so they require minimal artistic skills.
     
  8. Lee7

    Lee7

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    What I did was make sure I could purchase enough assets to make an MVP by myself and not need to rely on anyone. Trying to find quality help that doesnt get bored and stop producing after 2 weeks is like trying to find a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow, been there, done that, F*** that. If my MVP proves to be viable, I will hire artists to create custom art.

    EDIT: Also, try not to base your game on an artstyle, try to remain flexible. For instance, you have a really good idea to make a tower defense game and you envision a scifi theme. You probably wont find enough assets for that, but for a fantasy theme you probably could.
     
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  9. drewradley

    drewradley

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    Here you go!
     
  10. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    Very realistic... but that outfit doesn't seem like it'd help much against a dragon. :p
     
  11. Kiwasi

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    You can also design your games to avoid 3D models.
     
  12. drewradley

    drewradley

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    It's magic!
     
  13. Quist

    Quist

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    Thanks man, sounds like a good plan! :)
    - What is an MVP by the way?
    I guess it ain´t Most Valuable Player haha..
     
  14. Lee7

    Lee7

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    Minimum Viable Product.

    Basically, the minimum you need to make a viable (sellable) product that represents the final product but can be expanded upon to make a more complete game.
     
  15. GoesTo11

    GoesTo11

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    MVP: Maximum Vertex Polygon, if you don't know this you are lost with respect to modelling. :)

    Actually, it is minimum viable product. Basically, the minimum product that you can still sell.

    I think it is still quite valuable to learn to model even if you are not going to produce your own models from scratch. It is nice to be able to change models a little to fit what you want. Also programs like substance painter are a great way to change up model textures and are not too hard to learn. Most of the models that I am using are from the app store. The characters that I use were made in Adobe/Mixamo Fuse.
     
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  16. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    Would trading your programming skills for artwork fall under number three?
     
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  17. AcidArrow

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    I put vertices under my pillow each night, and in the morning I find completed 3d models!

    Thank you polygon fairy!
     
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  18. voltage

    voltage

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    Have you seen some Steam games out there? They're not pretty models by any means, but they get the job done. There are players like myself who would buy any game, as long as its fun.

    I'm no artist, but I make 3d models to depend on myself more. I plan on selling my S***ty art. Maybe the games will be fun someday? I think it's in your best interest to expand your horizons and learn how to make 3d art.
     
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  19. theANMATOR2b

    theANMATOR2b

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    Agree - and you can combine #5 with #2 or #3 so the art is easier to create. Easier = cheaper.
     
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  20. kburkhart84

    kburkhart84

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    I recommend you take up some Blender if you have trouble finding art help. It isn't as hard as it could be, and there is no reason you have to have super complex models either. Someone mentioned above how some steam games aren't pretty, but the models are "functional." I'm not much of an artist, but I've managed to learn my way around Blender, and between the Substance Suite and Gametextures.com, I'm trying to get the job done.
     
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  21. CaoMengde777

    CaoMengde777

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    make em yourself maybe
    blender is free

    scifi animator's videos on youtube helped me learn blender

    textures.com has alot of free textures..
     
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  22. Quist

    Quist

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    Well i just know that Blender is very difficult to get into.
    I mean, i´ve tried to use blender but it just seems very hard to get into because:
    1. I suck at drawing
    2. I can´t find any proper videos which aren't from a Blender version made in the middle ages.

    Also, I have looked around on Steam too, and yes some of them have som crappy 3D models.
    But it is still clear to see that they have made them myself and that it ain´t a huge mix of a 100 different Unity Asset Store models.
     
  23. Inxhaine

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    I would recommend a good Blender book, and go to Pinterest and search for "low poly" for inspiration to get started.
    I bought "Beginning Blender: Open Source 3D Modeling, Animation, and Game Design" by Lance Flavell some years back....still the best book for Blender I ever bought....still uses it when I create models for my Unity projects. Wish there were an updated version.

    I would recommend learn Blender and go for the low-poly-style...a good game is worth playing almost no matter the gfx. And it has a certain charm of its own if done right!
     
  24. Quist

    Quist

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    I will immediately check that book out, thanks man!
    - And yes i agree that the low-poly-style sounds like a very good plan. :)
     
  25. GoesTo11

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    safaribooksonline.com has a ton of good up to date books and many libraries have a subscription so you can often get free access online. I used to subscribe before I found out that I could access it for free from my library's website.
     
  26. neginfinity

    neginfinity

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    Drawing skill helps with modeling, but you can model without drawing skill.

    Well, can't help you with that, because I learned blender basics on version 2.49. So I don't have any idea what's a good blender book NOW. You could ask for tutorial advice on blenderartists forums.
     
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  27. I_Am_DreReid

    I_Am_DreReid

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    I make mine myself
     
  28. Martin_H

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  29. RichardKain

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    I make my own 3D models.

    But then, my background is actually in graphic design. So with art experience, it makes sense that I would produce my own graphics. I taught myself to create 3D models while I was in college. I started off making very basic 3D player models to use in Quake II. Back then, 3D modeling for games was a lot different than it is today. It was all about optimizing your models as much as you could in order to maximize performance. There were strict limitations that you had to work under. These days you can throw tens of thousands of polygons at most game engines and they don't even bat an eye.

    I can understand that creating your own 3D models isn't for everyone. And goodness knows, it takes A LOT of time to make 3D models correctly. Your best bet is to take advantage of services like the Asset Store, and royalty-free on-line model repositories. You can also take advantage of software such as MakeHuman to create custom characters quickly. The best thing you can do is adjust the scope and design of your game to accommodate the art resources that you currently have access to. You might want to look into art styles that better favor what you have now, possibly writing a custom shader for a more stylized rendering.
     
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  30. Schneider21

    Schneider21

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    I'm a pretty abysmal artist, but I'm making my own models anyway. It's taking FOREVER and I'll never make anything that looks as good as what a decent 3D artist makes just by blowing their nose, but damnit, the game I make will be 100% mine, and that's something that's important to me.
     
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  31. GarBenjamin

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    Two ways: either (a) get them from asset store or elsewhere online (or hired out) and (b) if I feel like just messing around with graphics go into a modeling program and start modeling. Basically I just build from primitive shapes and some extrusion here and there.

    I only recently chose Unity for my 3D game dev after spending a decent amount of time researching and testing many different options. I discovered that adding ProGrids 2 made a huge difference for me in working in the editor. But anyway...

    Not sure if you are after some kind of fantastic graphics or something. If so, then I won't be much help other than to sayhit the asset stores and / or contract out the work to a skilled artist.

    I'm one of those people who thinks the actual game (as in what it is about and what exactly you do in it) is far more important than how it looks. So I tend to do graphics stuff very "quick n easy". Heck I still think an awesome game in any genre can be made with colored cubes.

    For example, my current experiment looks like this:

    In-game it looks like this:


    I certainly won't be winning any prizes for best graphics of the year and that is fine. I just need an area to move around in, collect some stuff and blow some stuff up.

    It's a playground in a sense for making a little experimental game.

    As you can see those enemies (the objects with pyramids on top) you probably would never guess are enemies based on the screenshot. But I am of the mind that when playing the game any person will quickly figure it out when those things are zipping around and shooting at them causing the player's health to drop. It is pretty much a no-brainer.

    And I think it will still be satisfying if destroying them causes them to shatter into a mass of tiny pyramids or even cubes.

    That enemy took all of 10 minutes to model and paint the vertexes. Those pillars I think were maybe 5 minutes.

    So you have options. Find, buy or do it yourself and don't get hung up on it. Just get it done.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2016
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  32. Tomnnn

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    I wonder what that code would look like. Where would you even start? I like procedural stuff but the most I've done is make cubes from planes and then have them connect to other cubes. I can't even imagine what the code to generate a person would look like.

    Or even a stick figure. I've made those in blender.
     
  33. Velo222

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    I buy most of mine off of Turbosquid or the Unity Asset Store itself :)

    Of course, if you are low on money (or have no money), that doesn't help -- but that's how I get most of mine. I'm simply too lazy to make them myself (and very unskilled at it), and I don't have enough money to hire actual 3D artists most of the time lol.
     
  34. neginfinity

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    Meta-particles, iso-surfaces, marching cubes or dual-countoring. Maybe nurbs and splines.

    It depends on level of realism you want. In any case you'll have some preconfigured parameters somewhere.

    It would be the easiest to generate non-realistic person without a face, like a store mannequen, because the face would need too much refinement.

    If I were doing something like that, I'd try to start with metaball-based gingerbread man and attempt to refine it from there.
    metaballs.png
     
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  35. Tomnnn

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    Actually, yea, I thought so. Wouldn't isosurfaces not work well with an armature though? If your knight went to salute another knight, his hand would fuse with his face! Or was that marching cubes... or is it both...

    That's a lot nicer than the stick figure I modeled in blender.
     
  36. drewradley

    drewradley

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  37. neginfinity

    neginfinity

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    That's screenshot of an old OpenGL experiment of mine.

    In that case you'd use the procedural algorithm to generate and skin the initial mesh. Once generation is over it would be convereted to polygons and will no longer be a metaballs, just polygons. Kinda the way Spore did it..

    Of course, if you'd keep metaballs for the duration of the scene, then your knight would act as if he is created from liquid metal. You know, terminator style. Hands would fuse with face and body, and so on.
     
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  38. delinx32

    delinx32

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    Hello, another programmer that can't do art here. I've been playing with blender and honestly it isn't that bad once you get used to it. Once you get the hang of a few shortcut keys and learn the basics of reference images, you can do some pretty good stuff.

    The thing I hate is how much time it takes. I love to code and I love spending time coding. When I'm spending time making art I feel like I'm wasting so much time. I'd imagine that over time my workflow will get more streamlined and I'll get better/faster at it.

    Here's a gate and a tree I made with about 3 hours of practice in blender. I did all the texturing/unwrapping too which probably took another hour or two. Bear in mind that I have NO artistic skill at all. This was done using reference images, blender, and krita.

    Gate.PNG
     
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  39. Inxhaine

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    If you need a quick start guide for modelling guide for Blender, you could try:

    http://www.gamefromscratch.com/page...-experience-to-2D-or-3D-game-ready-asset.aspx

    But I would still recommend a good Blender Book, which is far better.

    For starting building simple characters for animation, I will recommend that you take a look at the Skin modifier in Blender:

    http://blog.digitaltutors.com/understanding-power-skin-modifier-blender/

    The link above is to give you an idea about how to get started with creating simple characters, and the base of the character kan be made into bones for animation.
     
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  40. Tomnnn

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    Oh wow, that makes a lot of sense! No wonder limbs got stuck together and fused with other parts of the creature randomly!!

    Sounds like a great way to make slime monsters / create a melting effect.
     
  41. BFGames

    BFGames

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    If you got the money then pay someone to do it.
     
  42. GarBenjamin

    GarBenjamin

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    @delinx32 I have to admit I had a little laugh when I read this...

    "I love to code and I love spending time coding. When I'm spending time making art I feel like I'm wasting so much time."

    I think that is just the difference in mindset between programmers and artists. It sounds like you have the same kind of programmer view I do: When it comes to game dev I mainly do art just so I have "stuff" to work with.

    For me the primary joy of game dev comes from the implementation of the systems and other code that bring the game world to life and establish rules and such. Anything that gets in the way (is an obstacle taking away from time spent on that core activity) I tend to see as "just get it done and out of the way".

    On the other hand, there are many times over the years that I have played around creating models and 2D art just for the fun of it. In those cases I spend more time because the whole point is just to play around making graphics for the fun of it.
     
  43. Billy4184

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    Yeah I think there is a difference between a programmer and an artist. I'm both, but I have to say they clash a little bit. I think I have some decent skill at modelling art but detailing and tweaking annoys the hell out of me, it isn't fun the way a lot of artists seem to enjoy it. Once I have the form and enough detail to give it a little character the rest feels like a grind. I start thinking about how I could try to program something to add all that detail.

    And idk, as weird as it sounds, there's an emotional jolt I get whenever I switch between programming and art or vice versa. One feels comfortable and orderly and the other is stimulating but messy.
     
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  44. GarBenjamin

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    I get that completely. I truly go into different "modes" when working on graphics and programming. And I'd guess that most real artists can just jump in to art work about any time. I need to actually be in the right frame of mind to do it. Some days I am just in the mood to do it. Other times to get to that point takes up to 30 minutes or more of just forcing myself to doodle around. Then finally I am in a sort of artsy frame of mind and can actually do what I need to.

    When I jump back to programming it is a much easier transition. I do enjoy messing around with graphics stuff. Of course, I don't set the bar very high and I can't imagine possibly spending an hour working on a single model. But for the stuff I do... it is actually enjoyable.

    Now on the other side... and I guess that is because I approach it as software engineering rather than "just coding"... I can easily spend hours just designing architecture, testing out different approaches and so forth. I do the same for art. Often have made the same model or drawn the same sprite a few different times one after the other just trying out different ways of doing it. Mainly because I am always trying to find the fastest way to get stuff done. Obviously, that is done more in the beginning and less after since the whole point is to figure it out "up front" (well for me anyway) so that I don't have to think much and try various approaches in the future.
     
  45. Billy4184

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    I think it gets easier the more you do it, it helps if you can sort of relax and 'ride' the change out without forcing yourself hehe. If I'm in programming mode and I want to switch to art, it helps to 'freestyle' for a while listening to some epic music mix and let my emotional side switch on. If I switch to programming, I put on classical music and it helps me reduce the stimulation.

    PS I also have a massive inspiration folder and I like to spend some time looking through it when I start on artwork. IMO it's all about putting your mind in the right setting, if you're still in 'mechanical mode' it just isn't possible to make anything expressive.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2016
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