Search Unity

Frustration: Game doesn't even appear in the store unless you search of it

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by CoCoNutti, Aug 14, 2019.

  1. CoCoNutti

    CoCoNutti

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    Hi,

    So how are us 'little people' trying to make a few dollars (literally) on a game that takes months/year to make, only to have your game not even show anywhere on the story unless you search for it specifically?

    How do we get noticed? I've tried game forums, social media (and a few paid apps), writing to apple editors, but I don't have enough clout obviously.

    I feel like packing it all in. I'm not asking for millions, but more than 20 downloads would be nice.

    What have others done to get downloads of a free game/get noticed?

    It seems the store is only made for larger devs now. Or am I seeing it wrong?

    Sorry for ranting, but it's depressing.
     
  2. femor

    femor

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    You can save up for promotion or just start spamming social media pages relating to your game or even selena gomez :D. You'll def get a few downloads
     
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  3. FMark92

    FMark92

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    Game doesn't even appear in the store unless you search of it
    THE ENTITLEMENT
     
  4. technicat

    technicat

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    For starters, you could gussy up your profile here. Anyone reading this thread wouldn't know what your game is or where it is and clicking on your avatar (which I suggest filling in with a graphic so it's more eye-catching) shows no profile page, which you could fill in with a web site and social media links, and in your profile I also recommend specifying a signature with links and info you want people reading your posts to instantly see.
     
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  5. zombiegorilla

    zombiegorilla

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    You advertise and market, just like everyone else does.
     
  6. GameDevCouple_I

    GameDevCouple_I

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    What platform?

    Generally you market and do PR, and you do it before, during and after launch.

    You didnt really expect with the 1000s of games uploaded every day that you would just magic across a load of users and not get drowned out by the saturation of the store?

    If you didnt invest in marketing or even try any free tactics yourself (there is tons of videos on 0 budget marketing including one on unity learn from konsoll conference) then you should honestly be grateful to get even 20 downloads.


    This is a hard industry, and just because you spent ages on a game does not mean you will get loads of downloads without also putting in the work for marketing, PR, and in general building exposure.


    Do you have a website/ launch page?

    Dev blog built up leading up to release?

    Did you make a press kit, and send it to various tier 1, 2 and 3 press?

    Did you pay for any promotion, even like £10 of promotion on facebook or twitter etc?

    Did you soft launch and adjust your game to match your stats so you retain and attact users better?

    Did you do any market analysis on your logo, profile, copy, etc? Do you even know your audience?

    Did you regularly make social media posts showing interesting and varied content every day leading up to release with increased frequency as you neared release?

    Do you have a trailer that follows the golden rules such as not too long, showing varied gameplay, drawing user in in first 5 seconds?

    Do you have varied and interesting marketing graphics on your store page?

    Did you ascertain what your initial download base would be before launching and then seek to do something about that if it was too low? Did you even have an idea of anyone who would be downloading? Or did you just release it and hope?


    If its no to any of these, then you could have done more (harsh but reality).

    Its a difficult reality we all get when releasing our first game if we have not researched before hand what to do for a succesful launch.

    People invest a lot of time and money into this side to get good results, it takes as much time as developing the game.

    An even harsher reality is that now that you have released and probably not done everytihng you could have, you have mostly missed out on the most vital point in launch. You cant re-release, you only get that opportunity once and gaining downloads on something that didnt get initial traction will be relatively difficult now. Sorry to sound negative but honestly its just being realistic. I too have been where you are and I treat releases with as much time and care as development now.

    TLDR: Next time have a marketing plan and enact it preferably months before releasing. No marketing + PR plan = bad launch and struggling to gain traction.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2019
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  7. Ryiah

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    When did you start advertising your game? How frequently did you post to social media? Past threads have left me with the impression that you need to start early and post on a regular basis.

    Have you tried creating a thread in the Made With Unity section? I don't know how common it is for people to try games mentioned there but I'm willing to bet that you can get at least 20.
     
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  8. BIGTIMEMASTER

    BIGTIMEMASTER

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    It's not get rich quick. You have to build your reputation brick by brick. It takes time. Probably need to make more than one game a year if its FTP mobile stuff.

    Keep making quality games and staying engaged with your fans. Make new friends, keep the old. Make lots of noise all over so people know you exist.

    If you dont have lots of energy, somebody with more energy gonna get you. Can't be lazy. Remember, the real adventure begins when you want it to end. As long as you dont quit, you'll win in the end.
     
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  9. Ony

    Ony

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    wait... wut????
     
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  10. BIGTIMEMASTER

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    For us regular ignoramuses, of course. :)
     
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  11. frosted

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    Here's the reality.

    Mobile is impossible already.
    PC is rapidly getting there.

    What matters most is that you build up a social network. Make connections, contact people, keep in touch with them. The thing that you're building, more than anything else, is that social network. If you want to make a living on this, it's as much (or more) about your contact list than it is your technical skill, game design, or anything else.
     
  12. JohnnyA

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    Always surprises me how many people make a post like this and don't post a link to their game. If you don't have enough posts to post a link at least the name of it!
     
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  13. SparrowsNest

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    I doubt that's the reason..
     
  14. EmperorCesar15

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    The advice about building a community of fans first is solid. It's something that needs to start from the beginning. The market is absolutely flooded, and if you're an unknown indie you have to be proactive about putting the game in front of people yourself. Of course I'm sure we all think "if super famous youtuber X covers our game, we will be successful" or "if Valve keeps our game on the front page we will be successful" but you simply don't have control over those kinds of things. What you do have control over is your own social media following, something you have to build over time.
     
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  15. Kiwasi

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    Think this through like a business transaction, because that's what it is. Everyone is in it for the money, so follow the money trail.

    Apple get's its money from selling a lot of apps. Their money comes from their customers. Customers are more likely to buy an app when presented with a dozen odd very good choices. They are likely to buy nothing if presented with a dozen mediocre or poor apps. Its in apple's best interest to only present the best of the best.

    All this means is that no one cares about the little people. You need to produce the best in class app, or go home. There are no prizes for second place. No market for a game that is meh. There is no space in the market to "make a few dollars", you will hit it big or get nothing.

    The only reason Apple tolerates mediocre apps at all is because it costs them nothing to host, and they still get a profit from every copy you push on friends and family. And there is a small chance your game could be the next flappy bird or minecraft, an unexpected hit that makes it big by doing something unexpected.

    But don't expect Apple to spend their valuable screen real estate selling your app, unless you can demonstrate that its going to make them a lot of money.
     
  16. AcidArrow

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    And that's why our industry is unhealthy and those that actually make the money are the ones that make the tools.
     
  17. Kiwasi

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    Most other industries consider "economies of scale" to be quite healthy. Games are sort of weird in that there is an expectation that one or two person teams working on their own should be able to produce something viable.
     
  18. AcidArrow

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    That's not what you described in your previous post though. (I'm a bit sleep deprived and my understanding of "economies of scale" may be wrong, for the record)

    AAA are supposedly struggling as well and have to resort to flooding their games with microtransactions to have the profits they want.

    Indies on the other hand are suffering from "masterpiece or bust", for a variety of reasons I won't go into now.

    I don't believe the above statements are indicative of an "economy of scale".
     
  19. angrypenguin

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    Are you suggesting that it would be more healthy to bolster mediocre products?
     
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  20. AcidArrow

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    I believe masterpiece or bust is unhealthy.

    No, "mediocre" products should not get bolstered, but from mediocre to masterpiece there is a whole gradient of other qualifiers and return on investment generally begins when you approach masterpiece <- that seems problematic to me.

    A healthy industry would be one where talented new industry people that fall short of masterpieces, should be able to grow and eventually produce a masterpiece.

    Now they produce a pretty good game, get nothing in return, and then get a job at Unity.
     
  21. angrypenguin

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    From a customer perspective, why should I play someone's "pretty good" game when there are "really good" and better games out there? There are enough excellent games that I already don't have time to play them all!

    If they're making games because they want to make games then why does it matter that they "get nothing in return"? To clarify, this question is meant as a starter, not an ender. The reasons that it matters will be different for different people, and will probably suggest the first steps towards solutions.

    If they're making games because they want to make money... well... @Kiwasi already covered it. If I want to start a commercially successful rock band then I need to either:
    a) be at least as good as other rock bands who want to sell to the same audience, or
    b) find a new audience who isn't already being satisfied, or
    b) do something that other rock bands aren't doing but which an existing audience wants.

    B and C don't necessarily involve creating "masterpieces". This could be satisfying a niche audience, or coming up with a desirably innovative product. However, do note that if it's successful enough then further work in that area will tend toward option A.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2019
  22. AcidArrow

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    I hate that argument.

    Why would you eat pretty good food when there's really good?

    Do you always eat really good?

    Are there factors like convenience, money, your tastes and what you feel like at a particular moment, that play into factor?

    Because "really good" is Assassin's Creed, or insert AAA title, and I don't like playing those games, and pretty good (or actually just "good" or "okay") was "911 Operator", which I played for a whole night, since I wanted to play of that type, it wasn't very good, but I got my money's worth.

    A pretty good niche game that would serve a niche will have a great difficult to find an audience, since it needs to be viral-y amazing to get enough exposure to find its niche.

    You know why everyone has a huge backlog on Steam of great games they haven't played? Because they don't feel like playing them. They would rather play something else. The problem is when I'm in the mood for something else, I'm having a really hard time finding it, because Steam only suggests to me super popular stuff.

    I mean, sure, but I'm talking about whether a state for an industry like that is healthy for the industry and the people in it.

    The music industry is far from a good example.
     
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  23. Murgilod

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    Then why is anyone playing AAA games at all when the games themselves are just... polished mediocrity? Maybe it's because bolstering the things with the highest marketing budgets as grand works while also burying everything else by dominating the conversation through sheer brute force isn't exactly great for creators.

    See, that's the thing, it's rarely about quality itself unless something actually ends up being aggressively bad, like Aliens: Colonial Marines, or Left Alive, or Anthem's state at launch. Instead, it ends up being about what matches expectations, but expectations aren't exactly high, are they? Red Dead Redemption 2 isn't a great game so much as it is a big game. By all accounts, the game itself is... dull. Incredibly dull. In fact, most AAA games are more about going through the motions, gameplay wise, than anything really "good."

    Maybe part of the problem is that we're trained to treat McDonald's as "really good" because it's impossible not to have McDonald's in focus.
     
  24. GameDevCouple_I

    GameDevCouple_I

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    Counter to what it may seem like from reading this thread, it is possible for a 1-4 man team to make it big in the current and future market....


    .... IF you also have a marketing plan, get funded and/or a publisher, do proper analysis on various game designs rather than just jump into one and hope because you believe its good others will too, analyse and understand your audience, do focus tests, go to exhibitions and conferences, network network network, make good connections with press and get them to write about your game etc etc.

    Essentially, if you treat your game like professional game developers do from the outset, you will be far more likely to do well than if you treat it like a hobbyist does.


    That I feel is the real problem, too many people focus on making a game and very little focus is spent on everything else. In reality making the game is like 30-40% of the work, actually doing the rest takes up a ton of time. In a AAA company you would be able to have a dedicated work force for that meaning your developers and artists and designers spend 100% of their time making the game. If your an indie you will need to sacrifice time from one for the other all the way through the project.

    Creating a viable kickstarter campaign for instance or any funding initiative will require you to take time to plan, and create a ton of assets that often are only used specifically for that purpose, such as mock up videos that look like gameplay etc.

    So its not impossible to do well as an indie, but you really have to work for it. All industries are the same, small startups have to really push hard and sacrifice everything to make it big. Thats why running your own business is not a lifestyle choice, its a long term comittment financially, but also in terms of time and effort.

    A decent route in is to build an audience before you build your game or alongside, such as by having a patreon account and making tutorials to help fund and grow audience, or creating asset store tools etc.

    You can also sell art assets on one of the big stores out there (such as asset store, unreal marketplace, selfy, gumroad, etc etc) but this again requires a lot of marketing etc.


    Also, you can do all of this and more and still get **** all sales. Thats the nature of business in a saturated and volatile market. Dust yourself off and try again, or give up and go into edTech, simvis or other industries that use the same skillset and offer far less chance of making it big, but a more stable and reliable income.
     
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  25. TenKHoursDev

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    A lesson in business that I've learned (more to the point): if you showcase/sell your product and it isn't protected and you are not quick enough to market it will be duplicated in some way by a competitor.

    I learned that with my mouse flight project, I don't care too much though it was a good learning experience and there's more than enough success to go around.

    The other case is a pottery bowl my mom had that got broken by my (dumbass) brother. Mom has told me that while stylish they are hard to get because the guy she got them from at the farmers market "doesn't care about the money" and rarely does any work to produce them.

    So what have I been doing to replace it for her (my brother being an irresponsible manchild)? I've contacted another pottery maker to produce another for her to replace it.
     
  26. angrypenguin

    angrypenguin

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    Err... it's not an argument. It's a question. It will have different answers for different people or audiences, so if you want to make a non-masterpiece game that's commercially viable I'd study it and potential answers really closely.

    In my last post options B and C address two reasons people may play less-than-really-good games. If your game targets people who aren't being satisfied by current offerings, or if you make something that is sufficiently different to current offerings, then those games don't have to be "masterpieces" because there is little or no competition in those gaps.

    One of those gaps could indeed be "military themed badass simulator for people who can't afford Call of Duty" (ie: competing on price). There are plenty of other options. How many games are there specifically for the elderly? What about a story-based RPG based on... Brazillian culture?

    But if you're going to make a game for an already well satisfied audience or need then yeah... you're going to have to compete on quality, and that's going to be tough!

    If you know your game's niche then why on Earth would you attempt to reach the audience via brute force? Wouldn't your target your marketing activities so that they reach your niche, and avoid wasting effort on people outside of it?

    Yeah, marketing budgets definitely have an impact.

    Still... lets not let our own tastes colour things here. I'm not that into Diablo, but that doesn't mean Diablo is "mediocre". It does what it does really well, to the point that I can't think of any game which does that specific thing better. It meets a particular set of tastes incredibly well, and for that reason it is not "mediocre". The same can be said for every so-called "AAA" game I can think of.

    You talk about "polished mediocrity", but for many people that polish is itself what raises something from mediocrity. Plenty of people just want a shiny, simple, accessible experience, and that's what those games are selling.
     
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  27. AcidArrow

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    @angrypenguin we are talking about different things. (and a loaded question isn't that much different than an argument)

    I am talking about "the state of the industry", and you're giving more practical advice.

    I am not saying it's impossible to formulate a strategy to improve your chances of being successful, I am saying that it's really much harder than it should be, for a variety of reasons I didn't really mention in this thread, because it's out of topic, and I believe that it's not good for the industry.

    I have nothing to say on "why would you do this?", well, you wouldn't. But that doesn't mean that's a good thing.
    I don't think that's how it works though. I was looking for a quote from Alexander Bruce the maker from Antichamber, which is niche, but got popular because of its more mass market marketing.

    But I'm too lazy to actually find it.
     
  28. Murgilod

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    Except here's the thing.

    This isn't true.

    The perceived quality of games has been quite aggressively pushed up by dominating the conversation. Look at the mobile market, where honest to god a lot of the top earning games are not only just the same game with a different skin, but they're also markedly worse games than they were even 7 years ago. Gaming kinda has its own sort of creeping normality and that normality has been driven entirely by marketing.

    But it's not like mobile games were leading the front here. This has been an ongoing thing since the launch of the Xbox 360, when games transitioned into being a major market force. Like, the PS2/OG Xbox/Gamecube era was by no means a small thing, but that was the era that showed that money in games was just the biggest potential earner. But in order to sustain the growth needed to make it a major player, things needed to change. And, you know, nothing quite sells in this sort of context quite like bombast.

    Like, videogames were the Marvel Cinematic Universe before the Marvel Cinematic Universe was even Samuel L Jackson showing up at the end of Iron Man.
     
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  29. angrypenguin

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    I'm aware of the former, but can you give an example of the latter for someone not that familiar with mobile games?
     
  30. ShilohGames

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    To be completely fair, this happens with indie media in books, movies, music, and games. There is so much content available that users cannot possible consume it all. Consumers naturally react by ignoring nearly all of the media and focusing their limited time on consuming only the very best media.

    Indie developers can fall short of masterpieces, share, and grow. The tools and markets are perfect for this to happen. The only thing indie developers cannot expect is to get enough money to survive on game sales alone while falling short of a masterpiece.
     
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  31. AcidArrow

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    "Very best" here meaning the thing most easily available to them. Maybe the very best for them at a point is a game they never heard of, but they simply don't know it exists.

    At the same time they are worn out by marketing and peer pressure to play the most "popular" games.
     
  32. Billy4184

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    Maybe it's less to do with the power of marketing, and more to do with the fact that Macdonalds is the only thing you can count on everyone liking. Niche games might be a smash hit within their niche, but it doesn't matter if only a quarter (or much less) of your potential audience likes them.

    I was watching a video on the demise of Dead Space the other day. Apparently the second one (which was still clearly in the horror genre) 'only' had 3 million sales and needed 6 million to be worth keeping the franchise around. To make number three, the only option was to go mainstream as a cover shooter (which didn't work considering where it came from and its fan base, but that's beside the point).

    I think at this point 'big-budget indie' (or just smaller AAA company) games are where production values meet great design and differentiated character. To get to the top, you have to polish the hell out of whatever appeals to the lowest common denominator, there's not much else to choose.
     
  33. BIGTIMEMASTER

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    Support your fellow indie devs. What goes around comes around.. that's a constant.

    What else is a constant is cyclic nature of business trends and fads. Fast food had its run, but now slow food is the next big thing.

    Find a niche, work it like gamedevxouple describes. If food is too hard to find, learn to live lean, and look elsewhere for your bread. Making games is intrinsically useless to life, so its privilege then to only do so for a living.

    Nobody needs 1 million dollars. Not even close. If you got unhealthy expectation, gonna have miserable life.

    I dont think its go big or bust. Its learn to live small, and enjoy it. That's maybe not something you can do if you live in LA or sydney... but you make your bed, you gotta sleep in it.

    Advantage of this kind of work is it can be done remote. You can make games from off grid cabin in middle of nowhere Kentucky. If you avoid the crowds, cost of living can become negligible. Just can't be a wuss about your creature comforts.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2019
  34. TenKHoursDev

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    @Murgilod you are so passionate about these things...

    The declaration that what @angrypenguin wrote 'isn't true' is not objective in the way that is was justified. Angrypenguin essentially wrote that a branding (if I may summarize) is what makes this "polished mediocrity" successful/popular. The justification given is subjective, and subjective things cannot be true or false apart from interpretation.

    I don't mean to lecture...

    @BIGTIMEMASTER I could use $1 million dollars!

    1million.jpg
     
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  35. SparrowsNest

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    I hate them, burgers taste like a used bottom of a shoe (dunno how it's called in english :p) only thing semi-decent in there is the fries, and the fact it's only semi-decent says a lot. fries being only fried potato and all..
     
  36. Billy4184

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    :D well it's an analogy. Still I think macdonalds is probably, generally speaking, the lowest common denominator in food taste..

    That's another thing, there's a lot of control moving from the usual corporate suspects to fairly large-scale 'indie' companies. Whether it's youtubers taking over media, electric scooters taking over public transport ... I see similar things going on with 'indie' games with fairly high production values that spend several years in early access, gathering huge momentum. There's surely a space in there somewhere that can be used to make great games that aren't all about mass appeal. Maybe it's not a space that the little fish can fill with retro pixel platformers, but that in turn might be a sort of maturing of the vanguard of indie development.
     
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  37. zombiegorilla

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    McDonalds for the most part, tastes good (to a vast majority of people... salt+fat == yummy). More importantly, McDonalds (and the rest), is consistent. If I get a quarter pounder, I know what it will taste like. Sometimes I want a meal that that just doesn't suck. A good burger house is might be better, but sometimes it can be a miss. A crappy burger is way worse than a mediocre one.

    I think that analogy often applies to games. Or at least we perceive it does. Sometimes I want to play a game just for relaxation. I don't need to play the best game ever, and don't want to put in any effort looking for a new game. Playing a bad game is worse than playing a mediocre game. You can usually count on heavily downloaded or super popular game to be at least marginally enjoyable. Same with AAA games. If it is for sale in Target or whatever, it is likely at least playable and entertaining, the process alone usually weeds out complete crap. And frankly, sometimes that is good enough. I like great games... I enjoy playing mediocre games... I hate playing crappy games, it defeats the whole point.

    If a game doesn't have any reviews/installs, I typically won't bother. Why would I? If the author doesn't have enough faith/confidence in their game to market it and attract players, why should I? Most of the bottom end of the App Store/Play is filled with "free" games that are absolute crap jammed with ads who really shouldn't be making games. I don't have the time or interest in supporting that. There are no gems to be found there.
     
  38. angrypenguin

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    Well, what I really meant is that it is a mistake to think something is bad from an audience perspective just because we, as enthusiasts who have studied and practiced game design, would prefer something else.

    Thought experiment: If those games were really "mediocre", and audiences truly play them just because a. they aren't aware of the superior games and b. those games aren't "polished" enough, then surely someone with deep pockets can make a polished superior game with a big marketing budget and get a sure success?
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2019
  39. Billy4184

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    True, and there's been times when I specifically didn't want to play a 'really good' game because my mood wouldn't have let me enjoy it, I just want to zone out for a while.

    And personally, I became less interested in Macdonalds after they started marketing themselves as something healthy and 'clean'. I never went there because of that.
     
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  40. BIGTIMEMASTER

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    IMO, McDonalds isnt mediocre. Its bottom of the barrel. Inedible. I been to the poorest places on earth and ate dirty food from the.poorest farmers there -- its leagues above macD's.

    Same with AAA shiny mediocrity. I just can't play with. I've tried, but I just can't see past all the stuff I hate in them.

    So I hardly play games much anymore. I dont really look much either as I dont have time anyway, but occasionally so.ething like exanima or one hour one life pops into radar and I buy a couple copies just to support something new and different and good.
     
  41. AndersMalmgren

    AndersMalmgren

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    I rather eat poop than McD :)

    Things is, triple A are mediocre in every field except visuals. They have stopped making good mechanics.

    Its here were indies can shine, doing actual good games, maybe on the surface they look mediocre visually compared to triple A. Sure. But gameplay and mechanics are more important
     
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  42. Deckard_89

    Deckard_89

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    I'll be honest guys, I love Big Macs like nothing else on Earth. I have wandered the land in search of anything as tasty that can be created in such a short amount of time, but only ever found disappointment.

    Though I'd rather have a Big Mac than a AAA-follow-objective-marker-focus-tested-boredom-generator, so I'm not sure the comparison fits.

    Apart from Resident Evil 2 RM, which is awesome (though there are certain things I still prefer in the original).
     
  43. Martin_H

    Martin_H

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    This one is worth checking out, although I found it too easy last time I played:
    https://store.steampowered.com/app/238960/Path_of_Exile/


    Maybe try a "Döner" when you get the chance:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doner_kebab


    Do you count Dark Souls and Sniper Elite 4 as indie games or AAA?
     
  44. BIGTIMEMASTER

    BIGTIMEMASTER

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    Yeah they are AAA. I like them but they are exceptions and definitely in different realm than more mainstream AAA. I think both franchise getting more bland though with each new generation. I wish sniper elite would become more hardcore and refined rather than trying to be casual friendly.
     
  45. zombiegorilla

    zombiegorilla

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    I have never been a huge fan, I likes me a Whopper honestly. A Whopper has lettuce and a tomato... wayyyyy more healthy. ;)
     
  46. zombiegorilla

    zombiegorilla

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    Even though my development focus is on the visual, I certainly favor gameplay over all else (unless the art direction is so bad it is distracting), as well. These days shiny, pretty art is pretty achievable with minimal effort (though art direction isn't).

    ---

    The trick is that there are so many indies and small dev games these days, I can't be fussed to go hunting for the gem amongst the crap. Gameplay is harder assess with a couple videos and screens. That is what reviews and reviewers are for, which are derived via installs which comes from marketing. The OP needs to market, invest in getting their game's name out there. If it is good, they will get good reviews and can do well. By not marketing, they are asking players to do the discovery work. Not gonna happen, too many games.
     
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  47. Billy4184

    Billy4184

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    Yeah never been too much of a fan myself, but I enjoy it occasionally for what it is ..

    On that note I wonder what the effect of the lack of reviews on epic store will be? I went there the other day to look for some cool games, and honestly, getting a grip on the quality and nature of the game without some detailed reviews felt difficult.

    I do understand why they do it, and I see the good side of it, but I'm not sure outsourcing reviews to youtube videos is going to work a lot of the time unless the game is already well known. People might not bother - or at least, they might be less inclined to go to the store itself as a means of discovery, which could have all sorts of impacts.
     
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  48. zombiegorilla

    zombiegorilla

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    Yea, that is an odd one. I typically grab the free one each week(ish), but if there is something I want I will first see if it is on Steam, or google reviews. But honestly their store now is like 50% pre-orders. The only reason I am using it is because I got a beta invite for Anno, and of course, I loves me some Satisfactory.

    Dunno if the store is like this because it is really early days, or they are really going for a stripped down experience. I sort of miss the reviews... but I don't miss all the other steam crap. So I am sorta cool with it for now. I guess.
     
  49. Murgilod

    Murgilod

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    I imagine it'll be like how it was on Steam before they had reviews. Things seemed to work out just fine there.
     
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  50. Billy4184

    Billy4184

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    Maybe, but in those days perhaps steam was a bit smaller?

    I hope it works out. I like the fact that Sweeney said up front they don't want crappy games on there. It's starting to look a bit like the 'boutique store' I was talking about a few years ago.

    But still I'm not sure about reviews. Without them it feels like just an ordinary online shop, whereas reviews on steam creates a sort of community feeling, at least an illusion of being able to draw from the perspective of some fellow gamers, for good or worse.

    As a developer, too, it's hard to get insight on how well particular kinds of games can do on there compared to steam.

    Anyway, apparently the guy in charge of it was running steamspy, so they should be able to figure out a way to put the right information out front.