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Do games or movies make humans happy?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Sounds-Wonderful, Oct 10, 2013.

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Do games or movies make humans happy?

  1. Yes, please let me explain, why...

    7 vote(s)
    70.0%
  2. Yes, please let me explain, why and what does make happy

    3 vote(s)
    30.0%
  1. Sounds-Wonderful

    Sounds-Wonderful

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    I was browsing through many games - especially here and on kongregate - and movies, waiting for the "now I am onto something" feeling. A game or movie that makes me feel home.

    I could not find it.

    Most games evoke tension, aggression or fear. Also, cg-worlds never seem to make you feel home maybe due to what is called the uncanny valley.

    I made it a habit to stop playing games the moment I feel bad. I ask myself the question, whether this very game that I am playing makes me feel good or bad. In most cases we don't listen to our mood - sometimes hoping that it gets better. In my experience, games don't make me feel calm after some time if they didn't in the first place.

    I started equipping myself with a bigger screen, a virtual reality helmet, I even built a diy-headtracker hoping that this will immerse me more in games and make me feel home but still, it didn't. I came to the conclusion, that neiter games nor movies can make you be happy but they are better than nothing at all.

    Do you have an idea where to find what I am looking for?

    PS: 2nd option is "No, please let me explain, why and what does make happy"
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2013
  2. login4donald

    login4donald

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    It really depends on the human. And I don't know what you mean by most games. There are a lot of games. GGI Worlds can make you feel at home, that I feel you should speak for your self. Yes the uncanny valley can be factor but it occurs when we she something so human but doesn't act like it. Like this:


    Is she human or isn't she?



    And I think you need to go out and do a thing. Without being philosophical and stuff, you can't find happiness when you have it already you just have to unlock, you do have the key of course.
     
  3. imaginaryhuman

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    Happiness comes from within.
    Happiness is unconditional love.
    Happiness is not caused by or affected by anything outside of you.
    Happiness is always available unless you choose against it.
    Happiness doesn't depend on whether something looks good or bad, because it overlooks all conditionality and sees only itself reflected back.
    Happiness is eternal.
    Happiness comes from the peace of knowing that only love is real.
    Happiness cannot be taken away unless it is conditionally based on certain preferences, judgements, interpretations or other subjective attitudes.
    Happiness is outside your awareness if you are acting automatically, unconsciously, or with resistance.
    Happiness is freely available and only requires your acceptance of it.
    Happiness cannot be caused or or uncaused by anything outside of you, no matter what it looks like.
    Happiness is extended through you and is given to what you see, to show you a happy experience, if you allow it.
    Happiness is blocked when you give away your power by deciding freely to pretend that something outside of you can choose happiness for you.
    Happiness is a spiritual reality and an experience of absolute truth.
    Happiness is not caused by a movie or a game or any other fantasy - you just trick yourself into only allowing yourself to be happy when the game or movie says so, so that you can pretend to disown it.
    Happiness comes when you let go of all fear.
    Happiness is not optional, only unhappiness is optional - happiness is absolute, unhappiness is relative - conditional happiness is not genuine.

    This all said, most people, me included, have convinced ourselves that something outside of ourselves chooses for us what we will experience and how we will interpret it and what we will feel when this happens. This is a state of spiritual unconsciousness, asleep at the wheel, letting ourselves be pushed around by gusts of wind and fateful events, hoping to exercise some control over avoiding the so-called bad stuff and getting more of the good stuff. But separating bad and good is a trick that everyone falls for which doesn't lead to happiness, only to denial and unhappiness, because separation is unhappiness. Happiness is oneness. Happiness is Unity.
     
  4. Marsupilami

    Marsupilami

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    I guess it depends on the individual's ability to imagine themselves as the target character of the movie or game. Relative exposure to virtual environments at younger ages when the brain is developing seems to determine one's ability to immerse themselves into the portrayed environment/character in adulthood. I consider myself to have hyper-virtual-realism. I find that the more I am interested in a subject the more I can experience senses that are not even directly portrayed in the subject. I find myself sweating or fatigued after watching a movie or playing a game where the main subject is doing a lot of strenuous activity. I sometimes genuinely experience emotions that I logically feel I should be experiencing if I was in the situation that the subject is in. Rescuing a portrayed loved one from deadly situation and briefly feeling elated and happy from the success.

    To put it short and simple. I do not believe one can easily learn in adulthood to use a substitution for reality and feel as though it is reality. You either have it or you don't.

    One caveat would be training in meditation and perhaps the acceptance that the reality you perceive to be "real" is merely a construct for experiencing alternate realities. Another one being the use of illicit drugs to make the brain more pliable and accepting of substituted reality.

    Of course in 10-20 years, I believe technology will exist that will allow one to experience a virtual reality indistinguishable from actual reality. Perhaps allowing "virtual happiness" to be indistinguishable from "actual happiness".
     
  5. PrimeDerektive

    PrimeDerektive

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    Endorphins make you happy. Studies have shown that video games and movies are absolutely capable of triggering endorphin releases in your brain.
     
  6. Yoska

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    Nah. But I suppose games and movies can at least make you forget your unhappiness for a brief moment. And that's good enough.

    I'm not sure what uncanny valley thing has to do with GC worlds, though. Whole uncanny valley thing is something I haven't ever experienced anyway.
     
  7. Aiursrage2k

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    If you had a productive fulfilling day then you go play a aaa game -- gta 5 you can feel good it's the cherry on top but if you are depressed kind of lounging around all day it might feel blaise -- more of the same. Moderation I guess is the key.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2013
  8. MarigoldFleur

    MarigoldFleur

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    If you are a developer and you answered "no" to this, please step away from your keyboard and stop making games.
     
  9. Sounds-Wonderful

    Sounds-Wonderful

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    pun intended?
     
  10. zombiegorilla

    zombiegorilla

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    Making games makes me happy. ...and so do British TV shows.
     
  11. Kryger

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    Movies and games used to make me happy, but not anymore. I don't really care either. Nowdays I just explore the ideas within them, and I don't mean like game ideas but ideas in more general sense.
     
  12. Sounds-Wonderful

    Sounds-Wonderful

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    Please elaborate.
     
  13. Kryger

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    The ideas? I guess it's just the concepts introduced. It can be about anything really but there has to be some real thought behind it. If it makes me think about something I can convince myself the experience wasn't a waste of time. It can even be fun but that's not happiness. That's a different sort of emotion.
     
  14. Sounds-Wonderful

    Sounds-Wonderful

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    Do games or movies make humans happy?
     
  15. imaginaryhuman

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    Well my wife isn't there to make me happy, as though she is only there for me to `take` happiness from her - sometimes it seems that she does encourage happiness in me but sometimes she isn't happy. When she is not happy it's up to me to choose whether I am happy and its up to me to extend my happiness to her, ie offer for her to be welcome to join me in my happiness, and to see her in a happy way so that she might remember she has that option. But still happiness comes from within.
     
  16. login4donald

    login4donald

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    "You've activated my Spell Card, 'Back To Square One'"

    What you ask seems generally open ended. Happy is a pretty broad term and can be relative for everyone and is often associated with joy and positive emotion. Also you use the term humans as a big generalization. Some 'humans' don't like movies, some don't like games, some don't like neither and some love both. So asking that is a bit weird. Plus you say humans like you're a bot or researching the race or something. I think a better question would be, "Which is more enjoyable, movies or games?" But it answer you question, there wouldn't be one straight answer answer considering many factors and perspectives. At least I think so.
     
  17. Kryger

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    No, I don't think so. You can be happy while playing a game, but the game is actually irrelevant to your happiness.
     
  18. MarigoldFleur

    MarigoldFleur

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    Happiness isn't a finite resource to be "taken" until it's gone and happiness absolutely can come from external sources. To say otherwise is emotionally immature at best.
     
  19. c-Row

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    Absolutely. That doesn't mean she can't evoke a feeling of happiness in you, though.
     
  20. Gigiwoo

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    When applied to the rest of your life, this mantra leads only to hedonism. Let me share two researchers perspectives on happiness.

    Dr. Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi (Flow) - says Flow is one of the most obvious measurements of happiness. Flow requires a balanced difficulty where goals are clear, and feedback is immediate. NOTE - Happiness requires DIFFICULTY.

    Dr. Martin Seligman (Flourish) - describes 'Well-Being' as resulting from 5 aspects known as PERMA: Positive feelings; Engagement; Relationships; Meaning; and Accomplishment. Of those, all but Positive feelings involve elements of stress, anxiousness, or straight up feeling bad sometimes.

    TL;DR; Suck it up, if you want true happiness.
    Gigi.
     
  21. login4donald

    login4donald

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    +1
     
  22. techmage

    techmage

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    Probably some nightclub or bar on a friday night...
     
  23. goat

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    Happiness doesn't require difficulty it requires appreciation of pleasantness and safety. You don't smile on summiting the Matterhorn because it was difficult you smile because you've summited safely and can enjoy the pleasant surroundings. That's why I'd smile at least and if I wasn't confident of being safe I wouldn't attempt to summit. That pleasure is still quite possible walking the valleys and enjoying the surrounds without the difficulty of summiting. In fact in summiting the Matterhorn you loose sight of one of the most pleasant sites in all of the world. Those that require difficulty to be happy are really seeking to project oneself as superior to others and their surroundings. You may be able to train to overcome your lack of adaptation to your surroundings but don't mistake that for superiority to the steinbock around the ridge.

    Care requires difference in the environment to care about, it not required the environment be difficult; with care comes happiness. Sometimes that means adapting the environment or yourself to handle the differences safely and pleasantly. True difficulty brings risks and danger: that's not a recipe for happiness unless you avoid the risks and danger. More likely, the eons of our ancestors world-wide that have made the world mostly safe most of the time for us. Our risk is comparably minimal and mostly health problems caused by poorly engineered urban environments; still those risks shouldn't be ignored. Difference and difficult aren't equivalents.

    But back to the movies and games creating happiness. I can't speak for others but they are utterly boring unless the main actors and characters are pleasant good people even if they may be a bit 'Lucy daft' or boring even. They make a poor substitute for a properly civil engineered urban environment but a pleasant occasional diversion. In Europe movies and games have a much smaller impact than the US and that's primarily because of the difference in how the urban environments are engineered.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2013
  24. goat

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    Occasional diversions are OK but entire lifestyle that has some calling themselves 'gamers'? Balance and diversity are key aspects and that's what's lacking with the niche lifestyles becomes all gaming, all tv, all bars and nighclubs, to the exclusion a physical activity and sobriety and many other activities. Seeking that one thing that will make you happy will likely isolate you from all the wonder of the world and might make you unhappy.

    I know, sounds trite of me to say because it sounds so easy to diversify your activities until you realize how woefully engineered the urban environments are in the United States to support such activities and social interaction because they are best enjoyed with others. Also these activities are expensive but compared to the never ending very expensive electronics upgrades and outlays on movies, games, and sports viewing (not the same as participation), diversifying your activities is cheap.

    Finally most in here are looking to retire with a big game that makes a lot of money not because of their joy in gaming. About as likely as winning a lottery but if those hours between buying a lottery ticket and waiting for the drawing makes you excited and happy and imagining writing a game that makes a lot of money can sustain the same feeling, go for it.

    It's the anticipation of being financially secure in life and helping others with that security that creates that feeling and not the difficulty. What's difficult about spending $2 and waiting for a drawing; besides trying to remember what the heck lottery it was you wanted to play to begin with now that every government in the world is underwriting them to put a woefully inadequate plaster trying to disguise their mismanagement of the public trust?

    Because the chances are like a lottery though, cool it and diversify. No one can be on an excited edge of anticipation for as long as it takes to make most console level good games. Instead, forget consoles, focus on mobile, pace yourself, learn a niche in a genre for your style games, and get quick and judicious in using your time to create your genre games and maybe you can really create a pleasant excitement every time you go to create a new game. Not saying you'll get rich but you will enjoy your time.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2013
  25. MarigoldFleur

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    What does this have to do with what I said?
     
  26. techmage

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    I just want to say.

    Alot of people early in games, and just the entire personal computing revolution, they were into psychedellic counter culture in the 60's. The sort of hedonistic, magickal, tantric viewpoint I believe is inherently intertwined with all digital entertainment and games. Carrying around these electronic devices to stimulate your senses in various ways is an advanced form of hedonism.

    Thus, I personally think when we start talking about 'happiness' in relation to games. An understanding of hedonistic history, tantra and actually magick are all necessary prerequisites to really place your view on it accurately.

    Personally in terms of all that I think video games have the potential to be a very powerful force in the happiness of humanity, and the elevation of humanity. I am just absolutely fascinated by the prospect of making multiplayer games and putting them in bars, or public places to bring people together. Or just making multiplayer games on a tablet that multiple people can play, and induce social bonding. I think it's through this that the entire archetype of the 'game', from hitting a ball around as paleolithic man, to modern video games, it's through that dynamic which I think it becomes really valuable to humanity.

    The isolating force of video games in the past decade or so I think is some weird development that has to go.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2013
  27. c-Row

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    Just remembered some sections from Mass Effect 3... if a game can make me feel sad, why shouldn't it be able to make me feel happy as well?
     
  28. brilliantgames

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  29. Sounds-Wonderful

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    goat, your english is very hard to understand, it reminds me of people with autism. Please write it in relatable metaphors instead.
     
  30. Sounds-Wonderful

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    Sounds like a plan.
     
  31. christinanorwood

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    Happiness is overrated. It gets boring fast. I think people need stimulation more than happiness.
     
  32. prominentgamer

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    When you are tired and you want to relax and play your favourite game, it will make you happy. Why not? There is no danger, if not to abuse.
     
  33. AndrewGrayGames

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    Only a Sith deals in absolutes.

    Seriously, though, I think you're trivializing the answer there Marigold. Happiness can also refer to an overarching emotional state that persists over a period of time, while a game is by necessity limited in the amount of time it can exert influence over a person's emotions. Thus, it's fully possible to be unhappy, and a game not truly helping, but instead providing a temporary 'mask' of positive emotions.

    I am not a psychiatrist, but I've been led to believe this is one of the 'setups' for game compulsion. I would like to find a practicing psychiatrist, describe this situation to her, and get their feedback.
     
  34. MarigoldFleur

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    Except making this a binary question is what's really trivialising emotions and games at the same time. If you read the OP's post, you can pretty clearly see that this is probably a PEBCAK situation. External sources such as media and just the world around them can make people happy. This has been a thing that's been a factor for thousands of years. Media allows us great amounts of introspection and cheap thrills that can both be considered happiness.

    If you say games and movies can't make you happy, then you deny their ability to elicit any other emotion. This, in itself, is incredibly damaging to the idea that games are anything more than mechanical constructs with feature sets you can easily list on the back of a box to help sell them.
     
  35. inafield

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    Biology and mental sciences are quite interesting in this regard. In order to get maximum endorphin kick from chips and salsa, it requires the right amount of sour cream. Scientist have studied this and they found that the chemical reaction is one of the #1 food methods of creating endorphins in the body. A similar thing happens with book, movie, and video game story arcs. Tension that creates anger and/or sadness is needed to maximize the feeling of the opposite extreme.

    I think story arcs do this through variation and exploring the range of emotion. The right amount of variation will stimulate and distract. Too much variation and it can break the 4th wall.... or 5th if you're playing with breaking the 4th wall (eg: Deadpool game).

    There are portions of the population that, due to one reason or another, are less capable of experiencing certain emotions from certain stimuli. I suspect the majority of these people need professional help because they are depressed and not fully capable of helping themselves.

    Absolutely. +1

    Semantically, what applies to one individual does not necessarily speak to the world as a whole. I can be in great grief over the loss of my aunt to cancer and yet be capable of laughing at "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" (great movie) and being put in a good mood having done some racing in Little Big Planet Karting.
     
  36. Aspiring_Failure

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    Happiness is really subjective. Even understanding that endorphines are the root of happiness, what exactly promotes the release of them is going to differ dramatically from person to person based on their personal belief systems, which are shaped and influenced by their environment and through the social conditioning they are exposed to. Not to mention that even what happiness is is subjective. Some people consider feelings of peace and solace to be happy, whilst others consider that feeling of being "alive" that stress, anxiety, worry, fear, and then relief provide you.

    But really, no matter what your idea of happiness is, there is definitely a game or movie that provides it out there. At it's core, happiness is just another emotion that we have, and games and movies are specifically designed to manipulate your emotions. In fact, I'd say that the more specifically designed to manipulate your emotions the product is, the more you're going to be able to enjoy it.

    Because no matter how you perceive happiness to be, it's absolutely impossible to relish in it without contrasting emotions, lest you enjoy being desensitized to it and therefore entering a state of depression, the more emotions that a game pulls from you and the more intensely that it does so, the more likely it will make you happy. I personally love playing any game that's capable of making me feel anything, and those are usually the games that stick in my mind forever and ever.
     
  37. zombiegorilla

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    Ok, if I wasn't a game dev by trade, my third career choice would definitely be researcher specializing in chips and salsa.
     
  38. zombiegorilla

    zombiegorilla

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    To quote the Brian(Jason Lee) from my all time favorite movie :
    "You can't have the sweet without the sour."
     
  39. sputnikbar

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    don't feed the troll.
     
  40. zombiegorilla

    zombiegorilla

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    ?
     
  41. sputnikbar

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    Hi Zombiegorilla,


    http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Don%27t_feed_the_Troll
    "don't feel the troll" is not written for you.
    I wrote it for some people who might think they are smart sharing their annoying feelings about video games/programming/living/eating/wearing black shoes/aso...
    the title of this thread says it all.
     
  42. Hikiko66

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    Hedonists would make all pain into bliss, and then they would torture themselves to death.

    Which requires intimate experience of unpleasantness and danger.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2013
  43. prominentgamer

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    What are you talking about?
     
  44. Ian094

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    I'd definitely say games cuz you get to experience all the action first hand rather than having someone else(The Actors) experience all the action for you.
     
  45. Sounds-Wonderful

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    What is experiencing it yourself versus playing a game?