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Creating own graphics from scratch or using others graphics?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by unity_P0X207LzI7FZyA, May 9, 2019.

  1. unity_P0X207LzI7FZyA

    unity_P0X207LzI7FZyA

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    Hi, I am a solo game developer, and I am working on my first 3d game. I am wondering if i should use free graphic assets, or use a program like blender to create my own environment from scratch. My concern are that I would run into legal issues using someone else's work. I don't mind making 3D models, but I want to be as efficient as possible.
     
  2. SparrowsNest

    SparrowsNest

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    When using someone elses assets, be it code or graphics, look for a license, it will tell you exactly what you can and can't do.
    If theres no license or it is unclear contact the creator and ask.
     
  3. ensiferum888

    ensiferum888

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    It depend on what your situation is. Did you quit your day job to make a living from games? If so do you still have a lot of money left or are you starting to wonder what you're going to eat next week?

    If you don't want to bother learning modeling (and everything that comes with it) and can afford it you could buy the models and concentrate your efforts on actually making your game. The "cons" to this are that you might have a hard time finding assets that fits the aesthetic of your game since they might come from different creators. You might end up using assets which are not exclusive to you so that one day another game with exactly the same assets might come out and it might even come out before you're finished with yours.

    If you don't mind the time sunk into learning about modeling, rigging, animating, unrwapping, texturing, baking then I would suggest you do so. Not only is it extremely fun but it's also rewarding to look at your game and say "I made this".

    In the end try to focus on what you need to do now. If efficiency is your prime directive and you can afford it then buying / commissioning assets would be the best option.
     
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  4. Antypodish

    Antypodish

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    Since you are starting this journey (will be long mind), I would use whatever can be in reach of hand.
    Then make sure, you can replace assets when suitable, as you progress in dev.
    So if you have some basics model of car, code your game in such way, you can replace it with other asset car.
    If not for legal matter, it for more suitable method.

    For example at the start using cubes as place holders. Then replace with simple car model, easy and quick to implement. Then good way to learn many things.
    And then replace for better model when time comes. Maybe purchased. Or own, or found free to use good one.
    In this way, you may save a tons of time, if you decide drop certain feature, or model.
     
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  5. moonjump

    moonjump

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    Unless you really want to do your own graphics, use existing assets, at least initially. You can always swap in your own later if the existing assets don't match or don't suit.

    I have always done my own, but that is in part because I couldn't find anything to suit.
     
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  6. BrandyStarbrite

    BrandyStarbrite

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    I'd say to learn to make your own assets, if even they look cartoony. At least you'll have full ownership of your assets, and feel satisfied with yourself and can brag that the assets in your game, were all created by you. And if you want, you can use a few free ones, that you find on the internet, in your game too.

    Advice: Make sure that the free ones, are totally free, without anything that could put you, in legal trouble.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2019
  7. Billy4184

    Billy4184

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    1. Teach yourself 3D art. If you find that you just can't do it ...

    2. Hire an artist. If you don't have the money ...

    3. Use the asset store.

    You can use anything from the asset store in your game, as long as it doesn't have a special license saying otherwise.
     
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  8. Lurking-Ninja

    Lurking-Ninja

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    Or does not use someone else's IP (batmobile anyone?)
     
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  9. Billy4184

    Billy4184

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    Yeah, there are a few ripoffs here and there.
     
  10. Murgilod

    Murgilod

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    Unfortunately, that's a huge problem with buying premade graphical assets. The onus is basically on the end user to have an encyclopedic knowledge of what is and is not something they don't have the rights to use. Turbosquid is still absolutely notorious for this. It's substantially better when you hire a freelancer, because in that situation the career that's more at risk is theirs.

    The safest option is always to make your own art, but that can be a prohibitively difficult process, especially for solo devs.
     
  11. Billy4184

    Billy4184

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    Maybe I'm not clued in, but I didn't think it happened all that often.

    Yeah, it's a pretty messy business, this thing of copyright. It's hard to hold anyone to account for anything over the internet, except at the final point of use.
     
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  12. Murgilod

    Murgilod

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    I've seen more than a few games have to issue patches (a notable one had a DMCA claim filed and had to be removed from Steam temporarily) because TurboSquid's "game ready" models are LOADED with infringing materials, especially if you're looking for things like anime stylized characters or vehicle stuff.
     
  13. BIGTIMEMASTER

    BIGTIMEMASTER

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    Solo developer means you always got your plate too full. Got to simplify.

    Worrying over licensing for every little piece of art is not simplifying. It's anxiety inducing and risky.

    Purchasing assets is not efficient unless you are getting most of your needs from one package. Reason is because standards are not consistently enforced so you'll be getting a hodge podge or junk that you got to try and make sense out of. If you aren't knowledgeable about 3d assets, you won't even be able to tell what will work and what wont. Like trying to build a house from scrap lumber. You can make it work, but ain't nobody gonna want to live in that house. Solo builder has to work extremely clean and simple.

    Learning to make 3d art will take you years to get halfway decent. It's something you can do if you want, but will require full time devotion for quite some time.

    So, everything sucks and what to do? Don't be a solo developer. Engage in jolly cooperation. Find an artist who you jive with, make something awesome together. If you work alone because you can't work with others, shame on you. Learn to work with others. Don't have to be an extrovert or nothing, just know how to compromise, check the ego, stay focused on the goal and let others know you got their back. Put the team above the mission and mission will be accomplished. Put the mission above the team and you may lose the team. Put yourself above the team and you may become a billionaire, but you're gonna burn in hell and the day society crumbles I'll be coming with the guillotine you capitalist pig! :) (a joke, not threatening anybody)

    Money helps lure the best trolls from their dens, but if you make an effort you can probably find your soul mate without a hefty sack of coin.

    Remember, lone wolves starve 99% of the time. But even cross-eyed dumb wolves can kill a moose if they work together.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2019
  14. Billy4184

    Billy4184

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    Maybe I should have put the idea of hiring an artist in first place. Really because this idea of starting a game in abject poverty and trying to master 10 different things at once is a bit overrated.

    I'm probably going to do all the art and programming for my first game, and possibly hire some people for stuff related to audio. The good thing is that I enjoy doing both programming and art a lot - though art tends to get old fast when I have to do a lot of it.

    I wish I had 20,000 to spend on the game though, because that way I could hire people and be a lot more comfortable. And tbh there's no good reason why I shouldn't have that much to spend, either.
     
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  15. BIGTIMEMASTER

    BIGTIMEMASTER

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    @Billy4184 , lol.

    Yeah I think it's the idea everybody begins with. That's what my initial ideas were as well. But once you actually start doing the work, then you realize how much time goes into even a very simple game. Most people will never make something as significant as pong, though they will try to make the next great MOBA.

    I am working on a game right now -- just me the artist and a programmer -- and we are really wishing we had someone to do the audio. It's a whole other full time load of work and really important but what can you do.
     
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  16. angrypenguin

    angrypenguin

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    I'd have put buying art in first place, despite having artists on my team. Yeah, the stuff they make is better than the stuff we buy, but the stuff we buy (and end up using) is good enough, and we need a lot of art. I'd much rather that they focus on the unique/important bits, and all of the common/filler stuff is just done as resource-efficiently as possible so we can get back to the unique/important stuff.

    Obviously I'd rather it didn't happen, but given the choice I'd rather have to fix a ripped-off asset that makes it into my game than lose the productivity of purchased assets. As already mentioned, we use purchased assets for the common/filler stuff, so if we have to change something out it's far from the end of the world. If you do things as properly as you can then I believe the benefits outweigh the risks.
     
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  17. Billy4184

    Billy4184

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    Depends what size game you're making, but I've found it hard to find a cohesive set of artwork that fits what I want. I admit I didn't look too hard, and I'm pretty particular about what I like visually. There are plenty of games that I wouldn't play just because they look very ordinary to me.

    I don't really know too much about the risks here. I would think that the vast majority of ripoffs never get held to account, and in the cases that they do, it's not too hard to fix. That said, at least for me the visual style of my game is something I sort of want to have a hand in shaping.
     
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  18. angrypenguin

    angrypenguin

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    Yes, visual style and consistency is a huge factor. If you're not going for something realistic-ish then getting many assets that suit is likely to be a challenge.
     
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  19. neoshaman

    neoshaman

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    Make a game first, then worry for consistency when you have something running, it's call "using placeholder". With something running you have a proof of concept to get people excited in helping you.
     
  20. unity_P0X207LzI7FZyA

    unity_P0X207LzI7FZyA

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    Wow I didn't expect all the comments, I really appreciate all of the advise! I deffinetly don't mind learning to 3d model, and like a lot of you have said being able to look at something and know that I have created it will be an achievement.

    I feel fairly confident on the coding side of things, because I have been learning it for years. Even if there is a lot in that department I need to learn still, i feel confident enough to find a solution for any problems I come across.

    I love working with people and I have tried to find a team to work with, but it is hard to find people around me who want to get together and work on something.

    Thinking about everyone's advise:
    1. I am going to take some time to learn how to create 3D models.
    2. Create a game using "place holders" so I can get the coding in place.
    3. Use the "place holders" to figure out exactly what I will need to create.

    I really want to work with people, but I want to have something to show for myself. So I can find a group to work with. :)