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Character movement selections

Discussion in 'Documentation' started by Tempus_G, Nov 22, 2018.

  1. Tempus_G

    Tempus_G

    Joined:
    May 12, 2015
    Posts:
    5
    When making a character, there are two general options. rigidbody or Character Controller.
    I would say that it is one of the hardest things to make as so much goes into a single object.
    As a relative beginner to this, I find it hard to get good information. Not to say that there is not a lot of information around the net and in usable format, but lots of it is out of date or not always working in a given setup for unknown reasons.
    What I would like is a dedicated page on the use of the two.

    Which is best for what use case.
    The best practice code to use for general movement in each case.
    Code that might work for both and code that is only for the given selected choice.
    Reasons for selecting one over the other and limitations to each.

    Reason is that I have found many examples but all seem to be different and conflicting in my mind.
    It would be nice to get an official Unity page on the matter.
    Easy when you know how, but hard when you don't.