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Best way to host WebGL for a large 2 gn Artifacts

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by shaggy128, Jun 18, 2020.

  1. shaggy128

    shaggy128

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2019
    Posts:
    4
    Hi All,

    What's the best way to host my webgl app if, I have artifcts that are large upto 2GB in sizes ?

    Azure app services is extremely low, taking 20 minutes, whereas my localhost takes 40secs


    Please advice for live hosting.



    Thank you,
     
  2. neginfinity

    neginfinity

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2013
    Posts:
    13,631
    The best idea is not to have webgl application that requires FAST 2GB download.

    2GB would require 4 minutes download at 60 Mbps. 40 seconds for 2GB of data is 400Mbps connection.

    This kind of internet speed is not very common.
     
  3. shaggy128

    shaggy128

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2019
    Posts:
    4
    Okay will be reducing the artifacts to around 200mb, still the website is very slow,

    I am testing it with a demo build of 40mb of ultra compressed texture, anyway I can. improve that ?

    Is there a optimal way to host this by setting up the bandwidth ?
     
  4. MadeFromPolygons

    MadeFromPolygons

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2013
    Posts:
    4,000
    Have your WebGL app just contain a loading scene and publish that, with the rest of content in asset bundles.

    Load the loading scene on startup(Which will download quick) and then request the content within scripts from your CDN via webrequests and you should find that you can at least show something more meaningful on the screen, or hide completely the load - for example behind a tutorial that plays while it loads or similar.

    Just make sure the loading page content is not too big or you will be back at the beginning again in terms of the initial loading time.

    Beyond that there is nothing you can do to make a file of X size download faster over Y connection speed without increasing Y. (Except of course hosting it elsewhere, if the new host provides better speeds).

    On AWS you can set content options to allow faster downloads etc, at increased cost. Thats how you would optimize this outside of this process using your CDN if your CDN is an S3 bucket in AWS - not sure of Azure comparison but I believe you can do the same thing from blob storage in Azure.