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Best way to achieve this look

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by DJ-Coco, Nov 11, 2018 at 1:02 AM.

  1. DJ-Coco

    DJ-Coco

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2014
    Posts:
    36
    First of all, sorry if I'm posting in the wrong subforum. I'm never sure which one to pick.

    So, anywho - a long time ago I once made a mock-up of a scene which looked as follows: https://i.imgur.com/KzaFcPS.png

    As you can see, the various monitors in this scene emit light. Though back then, it was really just a cheap hack. All that happens is that transparent colored radial gradients are layered on top of eachother. If you rotated the camera even just a little bit, everything broke.

    I'm trying to create a similar scene in Unity now. Except this time the camera moves and rotates all over the place, so a trick this cheap won't cut it anymore. I'm not entirely sure how I would replicate this kind of lighting.

    The obvious solution would be to use spot lights covering large areas that are baked into lightmaps. The problem with that is that the screens in this scene can flicker - all of them individually. So baking isn't really an option.

    Which brings us to realtime lights. Since all these lights blend together I'd have to make sure the quality settings allow that a lot of them can render at once - however, the default setting for the pixel light count is 4 on the highest quality setting. I don't think this is a very performant approach and I can see why. I'm also developing for mobile devices, so this idea seems like a big no-no as well.

    But I believe the must be another way to render these lights - especially since I'm not really doing much with them. These lights don't need to do complex math operations with bouncing or stuff, the floor doesn't have specular highlights, etc. All in all, it's a pretty simple scene.

    So if you guys got any ideas on how to implement this look, I'm all ears. I assume using Unity lights isn't a viable option.
     
  2. Murgilod

    Murgilod

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2013
    Posts:
    3,934
    Deferred rendering and careful material use will allow you to get better performance out of multiple light sources.