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Best Computer Build for Unity Max Usage

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by VavylonaEntertainment, Feb 13, 2018.

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  1. VavylonaEntertainment

    VavylonaEntertainment

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    Hello everyone, as the title says i want to build a pc strong enough to run even the most difficult unity scenes (post-fx, water, particles, large terrains with trees and details etc). Do i need the 1080/threadripper build style or can i do it with something less expencive?
     
  2. BIGTIMEMASTER

    BIGTIMEMASTER

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    Forum search. Google search. This has been asked a billion times.

    Specifically, search my content for similar question, as I was referenced a couple websites which helped me build my computer, which runs anything and cost me $1,400 to build, I think was the total.

    Edit: $1,400 included a new monitor and some other accessories
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2018
    RavenOfCode likes this.
  3. Toppazy

    Toppazy

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    Honestly, as stated it's a huge and nebulous question that you're unlikely to get a useful answer from.

    Where are you and what is your budget? From that people can give you practical suggestions and explain their pros and cons.

    Alternatively, if you pick two or three models that you might consider then people can go from there.

    It'd also be useful to know what kind of games you want to make. No point in people giving feedback about how to make The Witcher 4 if you're making Flappy Bird clones, and vice versa.

    Anyway, broad notes vaguely stabbing at your broad question:

    • Brand doesn't matter aside from stuff like how well they support their warranty, and how much of a price premium they charge.
    • I'll let others jump in on hardware specifics. You want loads of RAM, a recent mid-range or better CPU, the best GPU you can reasonably afford, and an SSD if affordable.
    • Don't forget the non-performance aspects - a decent screen, a keyboard you like to use, and so on. Also don't forget portability and battery life!
    • I'd pick a Windows PC, mostly because it gives you access to the full Visual Studio IDE. (VS Code is nice, but it's a beefy text editor as opposed to a full IDE.) If you want to make iOS games, though you need a Mac and may as well go a MacBook.
    • -Information give from -Bitcohen.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2018
  4. Joe-Censored

    Joe-Censored

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    I don't see how you can expect a real answer when on the one hand you say you want a computer maxed out for Unity, and on the other you want to find options that are less expensive.

    Unity likes lots of CPU cores, moderate or higher amount of RAM, fast video cards, and a fast SSD. Build out your computer with that in mind to the price point you are looking to spend, and you should be fine.

    Unity though is pretty forgiving, and you can still get good development done on lower spec hardware. For example, I built a 6 core i7 with an NVidia 980 about a year and a half ago to be used as my primary game dev computer, but I find I do most of my personal project development on my 2 core i7 laptop with onboard intel video. It works fine as long as I set light baking to manual, so it doesn't kick off on every scene change. In fact I like using it because I use that laptop as my low end hardware target for my current game, so it keeps me from going a bit crazy and having to optimize for lower hardware later.
     
  5. ShilohGames

    ShilohGames

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    You can do a lot of work in Unity with as little as a quad core CPU, 8GB RAM, and a GTX 770 or newer. Having said that, Unity does scale pretty well with additional hardware resources, so grab as much CPU, memory, and video card as your budget allows. Also, be sure to run an SSD drive, since much of the work will be IO bound to an extent.
     
  6. hippocoder

    hippocoder

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    Just get the best gaming computer you can afford that has the best gaming benchmarks, it's really that simple. Unity being a game engine and all.
     
  7. VavylonaEntertainment

    VavylonaEntertainment

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    Thank you guys. I currently have a 7yo i5-520m/geforce gt330m/4gb sony laptop that worked like a bitch all these years in Unity, and now i have to move on due to more advanced projects. I just wanted to know if there are any minimum requirements for general Unity use (more towards witcher 4 than angry birds).
     
  8. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    Unfortunately the only answer will be one of those "it depends on the project" answers. Build the best gaming computer for your budget like @hippocoder mentioned. For best results you may want to ask the people over at /r/buildapc for advice on the best hardware for your money.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/buildapc/

    Additionally I recommend creating an account with the following free website and becoming familiar with it. It tracks the current price of parts in its database from each vendor and can assist with determining which parts are compatible with your build.

    https://pcpartpicker.com/
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2018
  9. Joe-Censored

    Joe-Censored

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    I wouldn't just focus on a good gaming computer. Most games don't take advantage of high numbers of cores, and don't care about fast disk access all that much. Unity lightmap baking though will take advantage of every additional core as well as the SSD performance. Code compiling and generating builds also takes advantage of SSD performance.
     
  10. chippwalters

    chippwalters

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    If you have a fast internet connection, one way is to test configurations using a service like paperspace.com. I have a virtual computer up there with 32 gigs of RAM,500 gigabytes of SSD and a Quadro processor. It runs Unity great. I can even use it on my Chromebook.
     
  11. VavylonaEntertainment

    VavylonaEntertainment

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    Thank you but doesnt do it for me. As i said i want large terrain and particles editing without the slightest lagging. How much money should i throw on that?
     
  12. AndersMalmgren

    AndersMalmgren

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    Unity editor is a performance hogger, some lag will happen in large scenes.
    If you can wait for the Ryzen 2xxxx and reviews around that platform I would do that. Its possible alot of bang for the buck. I'm on the Ryzen 1800x with 32 gigs ram and a 1080 TI plus a Samsung 960 pro SSD. Pretty happy with it. Its not a perfect gaming computer since Zen has pretty low single core performance compared to Kaby lake.

    If you want a good balance between cores and single core perfomance maybe the Intel 8700k could be worth looking at. Keep in mind, you will nee to delid it to unlock its true potential. Intel glues their heatspreaders while AMD solder them
     
  13. VavylonaEntertainment

    VavylonaEntertainment

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    Here cheapest 1080 starts off 900 euro. What about multi/single core performance? What apps do they apply to?
     
  14. orb

    orb

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    Is your goal to save money? Build the "budget indie special":
    - Current generation i5
    - Motherboard at no more than $150 (or equivalent in local currency), SSD slots would be a bonus
    - 600W-750W PSU
    - GTX 1060 or 1070 (depending on whims of the market)
    - 8 or 16GB RAM (assuming 4 slots on the mobo, 2x4GB is fine for starters)
    - Any current SSD (M.2 NVMe if mobo allows)

    As for a case to stuff it all in, consider future expansion. Maybe get one wide and large enough to account for a pair of single-unit water coolers (NZXT Kraken and similar).

    --

    If you want the best not too crazy system for Unity you can't talk about fixed budgets though. It's only money after all, and you want an "ever-system" when first upgrade. This should last many years:
    - 6-core i7 or better
    - GeForce GTX 1080Ti (perhaps two, if mobo has enough PCIe slots)
    - 16-32GB RAM
    - NVMe SSDs (multiple - one for boot, one for project files)
    - Water coolers for both the GPU and the CPU
    - $300-600 motherboard to ensure you get one with all the extras
    - At least a 27" monitor (1440p or better), perhaps 30" if going 4k (they tend to be larger anyway)

    --

    You could also buy the best, most insane system if you have more money than sense. This involves a server motherboard which costs more than any gamer build normally mentioned in these forums, supports 2 or 4 Xeon processors, at least 192GB RAM and up to six GPUs. Just the mobo, RAM and pair of Xeons could run above $20000. Worth it for the dozens of cores.

    Option one and two is likely to leave you with money for food. But will you be happy? ;)
     
    Ryiah likes this.
  15. VavylonaEntertainment

    VavylonaEntertainment

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    The "budget indie special" killed me x)

    Can someone confirm that this build will do my job?
     
  16. orb

    orb

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    I'm using less :)
     
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  17. AndersMalmgren

    AndersMalmgren

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    I wouldn't go with an i5, only 4 cores and no HT
     
  18. VavylonaEntertainment

    VavylonaEntertainment

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    This is the cheapest i could do here (Didnt see the cooler though, tell me a price to find it by):



    Total: 1240 euros
     
  19. orb

    orb

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    2x8GB RAM is probably better if you're going for 16GB anyway. Leaves room for another 2x8 later, should you start to need it.
     
  20. VavylonaEntertainment

    VavylonaEntertainment

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    All others good?
     
  21. orb

    orb

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    HT doesn't do all that much, particularly for games. There are some rendering and compression tasks where it can help, but an i7 is more helped by being an i7 instead of an i5, than having hyper-threading.

    Here are some gaming benchmarks where the same i7 is tested with and without it:
    https://www.techpowerup.com/forums/...rks-core-i7-6700k-hyperthreading-test.219417/

    HT is really a way to more efficiently use an execution unit while it would otherwise wait for data. The virtual cores are really an extra set of registers, and have no execution unit. Parallel tasks with similar data work best, like in some forms of compression and signal processing. It's far less useful for wildly different tasks on the real and virtual core. Intel's promise of up to 30% performance increase isn't going to be the norm.

    Mostly :)

    If you can afford more push for the next GPU up first (at least a model with 4GB VRAM), then either a larger SSD or an additional 256GB, then a 6-core i7. The i5-8600K is good because it has 6 real cores though. Fast SSDs and having enough RAM makes more of a difference. More VRAM makes an amazing difference too, as tests of games in 1440p vs. 5k show on the latest iMacs. But for actual Unity editor use enough cores, RAM and fast storage are your main components.
     
    Ryiah likes this.
  22. AndersMalmgren

    AndersMalmgren

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    Thats not a NVMe drive, look for PCIe Gen3 x4 NVMe drives. Again, I would look at a better CPU with hyperthreading. And possible more cores
     
  23. AndersMalmgren

    AndersMalmgren

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    game development requirements != gaming requirements
     
  24. AndersMalmgren

    AndersMalmgren

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    Here is a list I did on my local store

    upload_2018-2-20_17-35-42.png

    Translates to 2200 USD in Sweden, probably cheaper in Russia. I picked a little cheaper memory at only 2666 mhz and also a littel cheaper mobo and also the cheaper 960 EVO instead of the Pro one
     
  25. VavylonaEntertainment

    VavylonaEntertainment

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    Hey man i wanted to thank you for your suggestion. Use this referral if you can: E57GKH2
     
  26. VavylonaEntertainment

    VavylonaEntertainment

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    Hey Anders, i just saw your answer man, here is my latest build:



    I have second thoughts for ram and storage quality though (not size) and if a such powerful GPU is actually needed
     
  27. AndersMalmgren

    AndersMalmgren

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    16 gig is a little low for a workstation today. I would try to get 32 or 64. Unity doesn't take much advantages of the GPU today sadly when baking light etc. But hopefully that will change!
     
  28. SnowInChina

    SnowInChina

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    and put in some extra ram
     
  29. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    Just remember the game itself won't be the only program running while you're developing it. You'll have the editor itself open, any content creation tools, any programming tools, and so on. You will want a computer that is more powerful than the computer the game is targeting.

    If you intend to push a GTX 1060 to the limit, for example, you'll want a card better than a GTX 1060 for development. For testing purposes though you'll eventually want a system that matches the game's requirements that you can try it on solo.
     
  30. Bitmann

    Bitmann

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    Useful.
    Thanks for advice also!
     
  31. VavylonaEntertainment

    VavylonaEntertainment

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    Disgusted to update: 2000×2000 terrain with legacy shader, post-process stack, global snow, thinly forested and lag went to hell. Since i need a nuclear reactor to build a damn scene that wont even be accessible to most of the players, see you again in a decade.

    Build: 1060 6gb, Ryzen 7 @ 3.4Ghz, 16gb ram @ 3000hz, 970 evo m.2
     
  32. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    Yes, you will need a beefy computer to play a scene that has had little optimization. You haven't provided us with much to go on but based on what you have you need to split that terrain up into multiple sections and disable/unload them when they go beyond a certain distance. You will need to set up LODs for foliage if you haven't already.
     
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  33. VavylonaEntertainment

    VavylonaEntertainment

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    The scene was pretty optimized, but it owe a few more details.

    What i wanted to create is an open world with high visuals (witcher 3) that can be played on most computers on those visuals. The second part will take years to happen.

    About the scene:

    No tree billboards (lods yes)
    Terrain resolution was 1024
    Maybe i should externally compress the textures before import.
    Tree distance - Max

    Quality Settings:
    Anisotropic Textures - Per Texture
    Texture Quality - Full Res
    Anti-Aliasing x2
    Soft Shadows - Medium Quality - Stable Fit
    Shadow Distance - Max
    No Vsync

    Camera clipping (.4-max)

    Only the shadows Distance can be reduced, if the design allows it.

    The snow post process had a big part in lagging but anything less provides a no-realistic result.

    If i split the map in parts and the player climbs a mountain, what will he see?
     
    Ryiah likes this.
  34. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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    You could replace distant map sections with lower resolution static meshes. I've only recently (past couple of months) started looking into open world game development and that is one of the recommendations I saw on Stack Exchange.
     
  35. VavylonaEntertainment

    VavylonaEntertainment

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    Do you know how to apply this process?
     
  36. Ryiah

    Ryiah

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  37. VavylonaEntertainment

    VavylonaEntertainment

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    Not the objects, the terrain. Like skyrim, where textures and terrain get lower quality over distance.
     
  38. zombiegorilla

    zombiegorilla

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    Please start a new top in general graphics or where appropriate. This was about hardware, that was resolved. Closing.
     
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