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Asset-store + Cryptocurrencies = Match made in heaven!

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Redz0ne, Jul 9, 2014.

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  1. Redz0ne

    Redz0ne

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    I'd love to see the asset store be able to offer customers the opportunity to purchase with bitcoin or other crypto-currencies (dogecoin, litecoin, etc)

    It seems to be where we're headed anyway so why not get in on the ground floor? (unless there are serious complications with that idea which I may not be privy to.)
     
  2. Murgilod

    Murgilod

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    Here's a complication: every cryptocurrency is wildly unstable and suffers from ridiculous value fluctuations. There's no benefit to using them over real money because, in the end, they need to be converted back to that to even be of significant use.
     
  3. inrain

    inrain

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    Later in the year, I'll be creating a standalone project that supports cryptocurrency in-game, easy to integrate. It looks like there aren't great options yet. I'll obviously support bitcoin, and possibly others, as a payment choice (where a platform permits) and as the underlying backing to micropayments and in-game currency. I'm also eyeing Ethereum to think of interesting game uses. This doesn't help you now. At least you know others are thinking about other uses though.

    Agreed. It'd be nice if Unity integrated Coinbase or Bitpay as a payment option for the Asset Store. It'd be easy for them to receive money in USD and support more sales. Win-win-win.
     
  4. pete1061

    pete1061

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    I agree. The concept of cryptocurrencies is very much alpha stage.

    It's a trendy thing for hipsters.

    If it's still around in 20 years, maybe I'll take it seriously.
     
  5. Dustin-Horne

    Dustin-Horne

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    Exactly. Not only that, but the Unity Asset Store has to pay the publishers (and in real money, not cryptocurrency). It would be one thing if Unity wanted to take a gamble and accept cryptocurrency for licensing.. but the real money values fluctuate far too much. There is a lot of money that flows through the asset store... a percentage of which goes to pay for exchanges in currencty and payment processing... a percentage of which goes to pay publishers (70% to be exact), and the rest has to cover the costs of maintaining the store, paying employees and leaving some for the Unity coffers.

    Now, with all of that money flowing through on a daily basis, if a lot of people paid with Bitcoin for example and Bitcoin happened to crash... that would be a huge loss for Unity. Unity pays out the asset store publishers on a fixed schedule so they don't have the luxury of waiting until the currency value goes back up before cashing out again. It's far too risky.
     
  6. zDemonhunter99

    zDemonhunter99

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    Nah, crypto currencies are way too unstable. One day their value is $800 and the next day they may dip down to $400(which means the price has pretty much doubled).
     
  7. inrain

    inrain

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    Your comments would be valid two years ago.

    Receiving USD directly without fluctuation risk and supporting bitcoin payers is exactly what payment processors like Coinbase and Bitpay handle. The only "hipster" trend that's evident to me is from those who mock others and/or who proudly have low technical understanding of it. You don't want to hold or pay in cryptocurrency? That's reasonable. Neither do I the majority of the time. I still prefer cash. However, I appreciate the value and brilliance of decentralized, programmable money that stems from a grassroots of the people. I'm certainly glad it's an increasing option. It was always a technological, progressive concept that seemed inevitable. Use it or don't. Know that accepting BTC->USD (and other national currencies) is no longer an unmitigated risk.

    Newegg, Namecheap, and other outlets now accept it for this reason.
     
  8. ippdev

    ippdev

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    A nice boot to the central banksters 'nads. Yes it fluctuates versus USD but if you study the currency exchange markets they are anything but stable..especial;y versus day to fday cost of living expenses. Gas and food fluctuate. Imagine getting bitcoins and then cashing them for USD or whatever currency when the value rises. Say you get 1 bitcoin whose value was equal to say 620.00USD on the 1st of the month. Instead of converting immediately you hold them in your BC wallet until the price hits 800.00USD a week later. You just made 180.00USD extra. Yes, it is speculating but if you treat it as yet another game mechanic that takes certain parameters to win you can do quite well in the virtual currency realm.
     
  9. pete1061

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    I don't think the central bankers are worried one bit about cryptocurrencies. And if they ever do present a true threat to their foundations, the central bankers will use the many resources at their disposal to destroy them.

    I don't see the world switching over anytime in the foreseeable future. You zealots may think you are "sticking it to the man." but you are not. Cryptocurrencies are just commodities bought with government fiat money and sold for government fiat money.

    And yes the values of many things fluctuate, but not as much as Bitcoin, it's just to unstable to depend on for the purpose of being a currency.

    And I'm sticking by my "hipster" judgement. It's "cool" to do things in Bitcoin.
     
    daisySa likes this.
  10. pete1061

    pete1061

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    Or it's $440 a week later, you just don't know.

    Might as well go to Vegas.

    I've never liked gambling.
     
  11. Murgilod

    Murgilod

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    Bitcoin prices have fluctuated by nearly $100 in the last month. In the last two months, it's been $200. You can sit here and fetishise the invisible hand of the free market all you want, but this is the very example of an unstable currency mired in hyperinflation and repeated crashes.
     
  12. inrain

    inrain

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    1. Using something doesn't make someone a zealot. The largest amount of zealotry, again, seems to be from people who go out of their way to mock other people or worse yet (actively or passively) act to stop them.

    2. Hopefully, we can all agree to be peaceful toward people who use bitcoin, not unlike you yourself would wish to be treated in your varied interests.

    3. The thought that powerful people might "use the many resources at their disposal to destroy [bitcoin/users]", although very realistic and happening in various ways around the world, is at the very least a highly unethical thought to relish in. I'm not suggesting you're relishing in it. I'm just emphasizing basic ethics.

    4. Don't use it. Like you say, it can be a gamble. It's especially improper for people to hold yet not know how to use or secure it properly, or for people to expect it to be anything beyond what it is. Many things are like that. Every stock exchange is filled to the brim with gamblers.

    5. Companies supporting {insert commodity} shouldn't bother you. As a seller, you needn't step outside the bounds of your local currency to still support the bitcoin market.


    Programmable money born of open, voluntary, decentralized integrity is cool. The only thing that isn't cool about it is the terrible state of computer security due to a plethora of monopolistic, cultural, and political reasons. If cryptocurrency is for "hipsters", then computing and networking is very "hipsterish." Those darn home-brew hipsters and their silly PCs!
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2014
  13. angrypenguin

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    What on earth do you even mean by this?
     
  14. inrain

    inrain

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    This is the case with standard commodities or, worse yet, most of the stock market. I don't recall anyone fetishizing the "invisible hand of the free market" to an extent they think bitcoin isn't fluctuating. One need not hold bitcoin to support it as a payment method.
     
  15. angrypenguin

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    Yeah, but nobody's suggesting that the Asset Store accept payment in stock options or quarts of milk. So...
     
    Kiwasi likes this.
  16. inrain

    inrain

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    It seems I've reiterated this five times in this thread, but what I mean is that payment providers such as Coinbase and Bitpay now exist. They mitigate the risk of currency fluctuation from, say, USD <-> BTC. In other words, if you as a seller wish to accept bitcoin but never hold it, you could set your prices in dollars. If a bitcoin user wishes to pay you, s/he goes through checkout normally, integrated with Bitpay, pays Bitpay, which converts on the spot a set price guaranteed to not fluctuate during that time window. USD enters your account as it does with any other payment processor.
     
  17. inrain

    inrain

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    So...

    So let's trivialize people who find use in bitcoin? Let's trivialize the fact that not everyone in the world has credit cards, debit cards, or easy-access to banking? Let's trivialize people who use a decentralized commodity as a currency buffer, to avoid extreme transfer fees, or to transact despite oppressive situations they may suffer -- and so long as they can connect no one can push them away? Personally, I find it beautiful and hopeful that anyone in any country who simply has access to the internet can potentially pay for an honest service, that they potentially have access to a modern world.

    I remember when Wordpress started accepting bitcoin a year+ ago. There were quite a number of people back then who fell under censored regimes who loved the ability to translate [labor or local dollars] -> [bitcoin] -> [worldwide culture and purchasing power many Westerners completely take for granted in their closed world, such as the very simple ability to even pay for a simple blogging service]. The technology itself is also intelligent and useful. It's the only stable decentralized network the "commons" has ever known thus far (outside of the internet, depending on one's terminology). It opens the door to many other things as the backbone (such as identity/document proofing): concepts previously impossible without trusting a central intermediary. But that's another topic.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2014
  18. angrypenguin

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    I'm not trivialising anything. I'm pointing out that while yes, these things do indeed also apply to commodities and stocks, the use cases for those things are completely different to the use case you're suggesting for crypto-currency, and thus the similarity isn't relevant.

    Also, for what it's worth, believe it or not I jumped into the conversation because I'm actually interested in this stuff, and that I haven't actually spoken against the suggestion, so I can't understand your chosen style of response.
     
  19. pete1061

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    1.You do come off as a zealot in the degree of your defense, like so many of the other bitcoin evangelists I hear around the net who are more than just merely using it, they are preaching about it like it's the greatest thing since sliced bread, touting it as "the future of money."

    2.I guess calling someone a "hipster" is more of an insult than I thought it was, It must be a derogatory term in internet culture. I'm sorry if I was coming off as hostile & mocking, I just wanted to critique. Is offering a critique not peaceful?

    3.It's pretty naive to think the leaders of the banking cartels would actually be ethical. And I didn't realize that my statement would come off as relishing in the thought, you we're reading too much into what I said. I just don't put it past the major financial institutions to play dirty pool when pushed into a corner.

    4.I don't plan on using a "currency" that is more of a hassle to use than cash, accepted fewer places, and takes too long for transactions to go through.

    5.Companies using Bitcoin don't bother me. I'm just stating my opinion on the subject.

    The only thing that will disprove the "fad" status of Bitcoin is time. We'll see where things are at in 10 years. Maybe it'll upgrade to "niche".

    There are some obstacles to wide scale adoption though. Cryptocurrencies have a huge learning curve, especially if one wants to keep them secure. You and I may be able to understand how to do this(btw, I do have more than a laymans understanding, you may know more than me about it, but I know enough to know I'm not interested.), but we're talking about the general public understanding the subject for it to become as "revolutionary" as some claim it to be. They also have to achieve some sort of stability in value for long term budgets to be based around cryptocurrencies. More of a legal structure has to be established, governments have to figure out how to tax & regulate cryptocurrencies if more businesses are to start paying employees in them. More people will have to be getting their paychecks in bitcoin for a solid crypto economy to form. And governments will want their cut in order to allow that to happen.

    Transaction speed has to improve as well, if it takes more than a few seconds, it's too long.
    If they upgrade the payment terminals at the retail stores to accept bitcoin, that will be a major stride forward.
    It's one thing to be able to get things online with them, it's a whole other thing to be able to buy your groceries at Safeway, or a slurpee at 7-11 with them. Those sorts of things will require the transaction verification process to be a hell of a lot faster.

    I'm not just thinking about this from a technical perspective, I am also thinking about this from an economic & sociological perspective. Wide scale adoption of cryptocurrencies will have to happen for them to be considered a threat by the central banks. Right now, it's barely a blip on their radar.

    Anyway, nothing will ever replace good 'ol cash, it will always be around in one form or another. It's quick, it's simple, everyone takes it.

    Go ahead, use bitcoin, I'm not trying to talk you out of it. I honestly hope you make millions. I'm just saying how I feel about them.
     
  20. inrain

    inrain

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    I'm indifferent over whether you personally use bitcoin. I've even suggested that your choosing not to is use it is a rational choice for you personally. This is clear if you read what I've written. As for me, I don't use bitcoin often. It's a good option to have nevertheless.

    Defending technology and people who use it isn't zealotry. Appreciating aspects of a technology and possibly informing others in the process isn't zealotry. Continuing to compound irony, noticeable zealotry seems to be by those who mock others or who might want to prevent them from using it (and who often disregard helpful information). Opinions are always welcomed by me, especially when they aren't laced with ill will. I welcome the personal feelings you've later expressed!

    Certainly, it'll be interesting to watch a 10 year progression in cryptocurrency. Some of what you say is certainly fair reasoning to the prospect of people wanting to see mass-societal adoption of bitcoin. However, as an integral positive to the technology itself, it needn't gain mass adoption to be successful. It could remain a niche and persist. Or it could remain a niche in the sense that people physically holding metal assets in this era is a niche, and people engineering circuit boards is a niche, and people handling TCP/IP sockets directly is a relative niche. Or it could whimper, displaced by better things. I think a 10-year scenario is where it remains a niche, as a lower-level commodity might remain a niche, on to which higher-level services back transactions for local value exchange and cryptographic-proofing. As you say, most people don't want to fumble around with it directly. Nor would reasonable people force them to. It needn't be understood by most people any more than the average person understands composing packets of information or mining platinum. Only basic principles of it will become widely understood.

    When certain governments do not function well as theoretical "democracies" and "republics" built to theoretically represent the masses (of ordinary people), then anything that puts more purchase-power into the hands of regular people is a positive evolution of society. When new 'Vietnams' are no longer promoted and waged, I'll stop focusing on them. When trillions-with-a-T dollars are no longer seized under the imaginary will of the commons for the sake of preemptive wars, drug wars, surveillance society, and flourishing prison economy -- only then -- should any ethical and rational person even begin to consider the trifling "tax implications" of bitcoin. Meanwhile, I'll continue to donate a sizable percentage of my meager income to organizations that actually care about people globally.

    Aye, thank you for your kind thoughts. May you have goodness in whatever you prefer. I don't expect to make major gains from cryptocurrency. One might consider it nothing more than yet-more diversification. It's one or two eggs in a proverbial basket. The eggs so happen to also be interesting, useful technology.
     
  21. pete1061

    pete1061

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    I'll also say that cryptocurrencies are a good start in the right direction. I'd love to see an end come to the banking cartels and the corruption they finance. That why I bring up mass adoption, I would like to "stick it to the man". It's still a very new idea, and it's going to take time to work all the kinks out of the concept. It's an evolving piece of software and perhaps a "Bitcoin 2.0" may be the one to spark the revolution against the banks.

    And I'll admit that I can come off as harsh in a text format like this. I've never been good at internet communications. I can be moody, and it doesn't come off well online. Perhaps zealot is a poor choice of words. Bitcoin fans are quite passionate though. I listen to a radio talk show (Free Talk Live) that has some major Bitcoin enthusiasts on it who have been talking about it since it's inception. They speak of it as if it's the most amazing thing on earth. I made the mistake of lumping all supporters of that technology into one group, my bad.

    But back to the original subject.

    It's entirely up to UT if they want to accept cryptocurrencies. I don't see why they couldn't, they handle international payments in other currencies don't they? I'm sure there is a service that could help them out, even considering any complications specific to their system. Many other major online businesses take it, even the state of California accepts Bitcoin.
     
  22. inrain

    inrain

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    Sorry. You need never be angry with me, penguin. I love penguins. ;) Glad you're interested! Likewise, don't take offense. I used your statement as sort of a launching pad for talking about larger things often overlooked. You may appreciate my role as somewhat of a lone defender. I don't mind the role. I'd defend anyone or anything worth having an opinion over. In a technical context, I had to defend the internet and cryptography itself a lot back in the 90s. Ouch!

    I also hope you can appreciate why the one liner:
    ...could be construed as trivializing the matter.

    I mean, sure, if the proposition by the OP were
    as difficult to engage in as accepting quarts of milk or stock options, then the Asset Store (or better yet Unity altogether accepting it) could become a significant burden. ...unless they're huge dairy freaks. Metaphors as they may be, it seemed to trivialize. I'd understand it if this were a couple years ago and someone was suggesting Unity directly integrate over the bitcoin network. That would've been a technical headache for anyone not fully prepared and secure. But now payment processors for it exist. It's quite reasonable for people to fling their btc/usd/xxx at the screen and suggest to Unity that they take their money.

    Personally, it's no sweat off my back if Unity doesn't accept bitcoin. It's just, there are many types of people in the world
    in varying circumstances, and it could matter to them. Therefore, it ends up mattering to me in (as does anyone having a voice matter to me). :)
     
  23. inrain

    inrain

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    This gave me a good laugh. That's an under-appreciated, entertaining show. It's always a genuine show that forces people to have an inner dialogue with their conscience, if anything else. It's the good kind of abrasiveness. I used to listen a bit before bitcoin was ever a blip on their radar. See, now maybe that's maybe hipsterish of me. ;) And I know how hyped they got over it.

    It's easy to be passionate about things we appreciate. I'd never propose anyone be forced to do something they're not comfortable with. That might be considered the thick line between activism and zealotry. I wouldn't even suggest to hypothetical enemies, let alone to family members, that they use bitcoin directly. Computer security is so impressively in a primitive era still.
     
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  24. Dustin-Horne

    Dustin-Horne

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    This is where it begins to sound a bit like zealotry and I think you're taking that in a far too derogatory way. It just means that you're being a little bit overzealous in your defense of BitCoin whether people agree with you or not. You've gone beyond the scope of providing simple supporting facts and into injecting your passionate political beliefs. Not saying I disagree with all or any of them, but that's what it is. It's not an insult, just an observation.

    What everyone seems to be ignoring is the ROI value for implementing the system. Does Unity really have enough of its user base that would use CryptoCurrency to justify devoting the development and management hours to adding the support? My guess is likely not and they have much higher priorities which is why you're highly unlikely to see it anytime soon.
     
  25. RockoDyne

    RockoDyne

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    The problem with crypto-currencies is that they aren't currencies, they're commodities. They are bought and sold like democratized beany babies. Most of them have giant logistics problems from an economic standpoint, either being too inflationary or too deflationary with most of them on the deflationary side. Had I had economics classes at the time, I could have wrote some gems of papers illustrating how bitcoin is a nightmare of a currency but a goldmine of a commodity.

    It's quaint technology, but with any holistic view of them, they are a joke of a currency.
     
  26. inrain

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    I tried to set a mostly positive but matter-of-fact tone. Reading my words with a more positive lense would help. For example, I'm not flailing my arms about or banging a fist on the table. Ha, although I'd empathize with anyone who felt some rage over the state of affairs in the world; but I digress. Rather, I'm sipping coffee right now. :)

    The economic implications were brought up. Sharing personal opinions about the dynamics of it all is probably always going to be conflated with a little bit of zealotry. So, really, at this point, it's probably better that I just come to love wearing clothing with a scarlet Z rather than try to cover it up. :p (Mind you, my views surrounding oligarchy and exploitation of people: that shouldn't in any way be construed as thinking that bitcoin is a sole savior against any of it. It is what it is. My views do, however, fit directly into the economic implications of it.)


    The ROI is good because the investment of time is minimal. It's easy to integrate those payment processors. Maybe not a single person chooses to pay for Unity or assets ever via that method. It could be that it takes a year of waiting before the first sale happens. Or maybe Unity gets a publicity bump and it settles into catering to a handful of users. Or maybe truckloads of users around the world start buying assets. Would be interesting to know. Indie developers are naturally tech enthusiasts, anyway, so I suspect there's a decent overlap.
     
  27. melkior

    melkior

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    two words:
    Mt. Gox
     
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  28. inrain

    inrain

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    You're confusing bitcoin's (and therefore other commodities') deflationary basis with governmental currency deflation. They are two entirely separate issues. A few well-known economists are confused by this too, almost always due to a severe lack of understanding about how the technology works and about why people find use in it as a a digital commodity to begin with. Having gone through the ringer of economics studies, I can assure you that half of what standard economics teaches today is often rendered on its head by the other half. Everyone disagrees even if on face value they appear to agree. That's because most of macroeconomics is inherently dependent on the unpredictable tide of human condition, always at the mercy of culture, greed, and random acts of kindness and evolution.

    If bitcoin itself were to become your national currency then you could speak to the economic implications of it like that. Lucky for you, that won't happen. No one suggests it become anything other than what it is. If beanie babies functioned as the world's only stable, decentralized data-store, then, sure, one might consider using beanie babies.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2014
  29. RockoDyne

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    I would say you're conflating bitcoin's technical capabilities with it's actual economic value. To present the page I'm on, once the creation of bitcoins stops/slows the only thing that can happen to the supply is decrease (It's called entropy bitches). So long as there is any demand, that means the only thing that can happen to the value of bitcoin is increase in the long run.

    If I know that something I'm holding is guaranteed to only increase in value, then I sure as hell am not buying the milk with it.

    So why do you support bitcoin? If by stable you mean the thing who's value has moved across five decimal points in the last five years, then sure it's stable. As for decentralized it has been several years since I learned how it works (so I fully expect to not have remember how this works completely), but I could have swore there was a central database that actually kept track of all bitcoin transactions. So until proven wrong, I have to question whether YOU actual understand the technology behind bitcoin.
     
  30. inrain

    inrain

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    I'm referring to the infrastructure as being stable.
    This is one of those moments where one either facepalms or stays positive and replies neutrally. I'll do the latter. Indeed, you've been mistaken. Bitcoin's ledger
    is decentralized. The network is fully p2p. The threat to this is pooled resources, where many people defer their mining power to a few, which could cause a fork in the ledger (creating two inconsistent versions). Fortunately, that's not an abstract threat. It's readily detectable. It grows increasingly unlikely and increasingly likely to be resolved quickly should that happen. It's stable.
    Ok.
     
  31. RockoDyne

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    Because when I worry about what currency to use, I worry first about its up time. I care much less about it's technical merit and far more about its economic value.

    That sounds vaguely familiar, so sure. It's been about four years since I had heard a detailed explanation of how it worked. Given the explanation was at least a good third about block chain ciphers and the rest of it's cryptography, it is a fair reason why I'm fuzzy on the details. The comment was mostly a pre-combative measure against the anonymity claim I've heard too many times.
     
  32. inrain

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    Yes, actually.

    One should care more about its technical merit and stability. Bitcoin is nothing without stability and the internet -- much like national currencies are nothing without stable governments and their ability to support their debt. Stability is fundamental. Relative pricing is secondarily formed upon whether something is stable and from doubt thereof.
     
  33. angrypenguin

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    Actually, I was pointing out either an error or a missed step in your reasoning, which I was interested in hearing. By "So..?" I was prompting you to explain the gap. Previously you'd hand waved away the flaws people were pointing out by highlighting that they apply elsewhere, but were completely ignoring that the flaws are completely irrelevant there. (In fact, they're not "flaws" there - in those markets fluctuations are entirely the point... but I digress.)

    Yes, stocks and commodities are also subject to potentially extreme fluctuation. However, since they're traded to make money the fluctuations are in fact a requirement, where you're talking about using something as a payment method and in that use case fluctuations simply make something far less reliable and far more risky.

    So..?
     
  34. inrain

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    You should rephrase your statements in the form of direct questions. I'm not entirely sure what context you're asking about. I'd genuinely answer. What gap; which flaws; what missed step in reasoning compared to what; hand waving away flaws? Explicitly ask what you're trying to ask. I don't tip-toe around any flaws in anything, especially not in tech, so I have no idea why you're thinking that. No, accepting bitcoin isn't in the same realm of difficulty as would be accepting quarts of milk, stock options, or metaphorical milk/options; are you saying that saying as much creates some sort of gap to you? Were you implying something else?

    For starters...

    Are you asking about bitcoin being traded outside this thread's context of [Unity accepting BTC directly into USD via a payment processor]? Are you implying that someone in this thread, let alone myself, has claimed an asset with fluctuating prices is without risk? I've said quite the contrary. If a person's goal is to treat an asset -- anything for that matter -- as a high-stakes investment, and one where losses cannot be afforded, then that can be very risky for that person. Is that what you're wondering? Happy to offer opinions once it's clear.
     
  35. ippdev

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    Yes. Never turn a game trading card exchange into an entity that actually handles a currency equivalent. If it was not so much like fiat money there would not be incentive to steal it.

    The FRN (USD) is a commodity. It is not real money. It is not stable. It will crash hard soon.
     
  36. hippocoder

    hippocoder

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    There's no future in bitcoin. It's just a fad and the world doesn't need yet another currency that can be manipulated with wildly fluctuating rates.

    If you want to purchase via bitcoin, contact the author or exchange your bitcoin for a currency the asset store supports. Last I checked, asset store authors want real money.

    If Unity is to use a payment processor, then it's likely they will end up with less revenue, and therefore not be willing to use it, instead users are more than welcome to use a payment processor themselves and convert their bitcoin into a suitable currency.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2014
  37. Grix

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    I'm bumping this old thread because cryptocurrencies are more popular than ever and I would love to see the unity asset store accepting them.
     
  38. LaneFox

    LaneFox

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    There is a Dogecoin.

    Needless to say, I don't plan on using cryptocurrencies any time soon.
     
  39. Dustin-Horne

    Dustin-Horne

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    I also have no play to use cryptocurrencies and except for the introduction of additional currencies (such as Dogecoin and Lightcoin), I think the cryptocurrency fad has started to level off and possibly even decline... it definitely doesn't have the attention now that it did a year ago. I still don't see a compelling need for it... it's still a niche product.
     
  40. Kiwasi

    Kiwasi

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    Not sure what the fuss is about. The asset store already accepts bit coin payments. It's a two step process.
    1. Convert the bit coins to USD
    2. Pay in USD
    Now if this is not possible in one step using a bit coin client, then bit coin proponents are far from the technical geniuses they purport to be.

    (Worth noting this process also works for quarts of milk. It can be slow for illiquid commodities)
     
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  41. Grix

    Grix

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    It has exited the media/bubble phase and entered the plateau of productivity. You don't see bitcoin that much in the news anymore, but that doesn't mean that its use is fading. As said, bitcoin is actually more popular than ever, with no signs of slowing down: https://blockchain.info/charts/n-transactions?timespan=all

    Since this thread was last active, these companies have started accepting bitcoin: Microsoft, Dell, 1-800-Flowers, Newegg, Wikipedia, Rakuten, etc, and hundreds of millions of dollars of VC investments have been made.

    It's easy for us here in the western world to say "I don't see the point of bitcoin" at first glance, but remember that Visa/Mastercard/Paypal etc blocks payments in many countries for arbitrary reasons. Should a developer from Haiti, Ethiopia or Kenya not be allowed to use the Asset Store? Bitcoin enables more people to buy, that's a fact. And if some or even the majority of people don't see the point, that's fine. But the ones who do, will thank Unity.
     
  42. Dustin-Horne

    Dustin-Horne

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    The crux of it is... the Asset Store and Unity are a business, not a charity. And while it may help a few people, the miniscule number of people who would leverage it likely are not enough to justify the effort of adding it as an option. The volatility of the currency is also an issue and results in a lot of added risk.
     
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  43. Grix

    Grix

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    No, the volatility is not an issue. There are payment processors that automatically convert the bitcoin received to USD at the correct value, so that Unity won't notice the difference between a user paying with credit card or bitcoin, if they don't want to. (Except that bitcoin payments would have far less fees, even with the automatic currency conversion). There is no risk in accepting bitcoin.
     
  44. LaneFox

    LaneFox

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    I'm looking forward to a time when I can pay for purchases with happy thoughts and feelings.
     
  45. Dustin-Horne

    Dustin-Horne

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    @Grix -

    Well, you could always start your own asset store that accepts Bitcoin I guess... If it turns out to be so wildly useful you'll be a millionaire in no time. :)
     
  46. Grix

    Grix

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    No need to be condescending. To be frank I would have thought that fellow developers would recognize the potential that is programmable money.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2015
  47. Dustin-Horne

    Dustin-Horne

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    It's not meant to be condescending at all, just meant to make my point. The effort is not worth the return.
     
  48. Kiwasi

    Kiwasi

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    I'm going to risk a thread lock by mentioning politics.

    I doubt bit coins will make much of a difference to those who can't buy assets other ways. The socio economic conditions that persist in the poorer countries are unlikely to be conducive to buying assets for video game development.

    As to the richer countries that could afford assets, those that are blocked by 'arbitrary reasons', these arbitrary reasons are related to US export controls and economic sanctions. Unity would be just as obligated to block these transactions as PayPal or Visa.
     
  49. angrypenguin

    angrypenguin

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    From Unity's point of view, what would the return even be? Even if it was transparent and risk free to them, the result is that they do some work so that things on their end remain exactly as they are.

    The question is, would this earn new customers and/or sales?
     
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  50. Murgilod

    Murgilod

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    Well you see, it's actually quite simple.

    *wheels out a gigantic Microsoft Surface playing nothing but Ron Paul gifs*
     
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