Search Unity

  1. Unity 6 Preview is now available. To find out what's new, have a look at our Unity 6 Preview blog post.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Unity is excited to announce that we will be collaborating with TheXPlace for a summer game jam from June 13 - June 19. Learn more.
    Dismiss Notice

Am I right to assume..

Discussion in 'Scripting' started by crockett, Sep 5, 2008.

  1. crockett

    crockett

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2008
    Posts:
    264
    Am I right to assume, that most people are using C# programing with Unity? I'm trying to decide which language to start learning, Javascript or C# and from my searches here on the board, it seems more people prefer C#.

    For my self I'm a web developer but never do any programing and javascript would come in handy.. However when I look around for training all I can find is website related stuff.

    Anyone have any good javascript links or is C# just the better option?
     
  2. Jessy

    Jessy

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Posts:
    7,325
    I looked around for training in both languages over the past year, and while you are right about JavaScript and "website related stuff", all you will find is Windows related stuff, as far as C# goes. Neither language has particularly good resources for learning game design with Unity, but at least all of the examples in the Unity documentation are written in JavaScript. I learned the fundamentals of each, but am sticking with JavaScript for now, because I think it is less ugly. Opinions differ on this, of course.
     
  3. Eric5h5

    Eric5h5

    Volunteer Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    Posts:
    32,401
    There was a poll a while back that had most people using Javascript. Not sure if that's still the case, but use whatever you feel most comfortable with, keeping in mind that Unity Javascript is only marginally useful for learning web Javascript, as there are some significant differences. Personally I find C# really irritating to deal with and don't recommend it, but I'm sure someone (like Jashan) will come along and disagree. :)

    --Eric
     
  4. crockett

    crockett

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2008
    Posts:
    264
    You guys think it's better to just go learn the web side of Javascript and then figure out how to put it to use with Unity?

    3dbuzz.com has a little bit of C# for game development but it's mostly focusing around XNA environment. I was thinking of trying out their XNA training videos because they have a lot of C# programing in them.

    My biggest thing with programing is that I find learning it so boring that I just can't seem to stick with it. I actually went to school for 3D animation where the owner of 3DBuzz used to teach.

    He was a good teacher so I'm thinking maybe I'd be-able to learn from his training video's. I'm just wondering if it would be transferable back into unity or is XNA a totally different set up?
     
  5. Jessy

    Jessy

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Posts:
    7,325
    Actually, the closest I have found to working with Unity+JavaScript is using Flash+ActionScript. You can make games with either platform, so that's my recommendation; might as well learn as much as you can in terms of gaming. Todd Perkins has some nice ones at Lynda.com:

    http://movielibrary.lynda.com/html/modListing.asp?sid=81

    That said, I actually find working with Unity easier than Flash, despite the added complexity inherent in 3D graphics. If it gets too boring (due to it not being focused on what you want to do), give it a break, and come ask questions on these boards. You will find help.
     
  6. housewarmer

    housewarmer

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    Posts:
    74
    So what about boo? I'm still getting used to scripting in general, and since more resources are available in JS I've stuck with it. But from what I've read about boo it seems much cleaner and more streamlined. So other than a lack of tutorials and code is there any particular disadvantage to using it?
     
  7. Jessy

    Jessy

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Posts:
    7,325
    Not that I can see, other than a potentially much shorter lifespan than the other languages (it belongs to one guy). But the lack of instructional material is a pretty big minus, and I doubt that is going to change soon, if ever.